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View Full Version : M1 sitting for 20 years.


dakinejb
09-22-2010, 8:58 AM
What whould i need to do check before taking it to the range?

X-NewYawker
09-22-2010, 8:59 AM
Clean it. Oil it.
Clean the BORE.
Garand or Carbine?

M1A Rifleman
09-22-2010, 8:59 AM
Break down, inspect, clean, & grease.

X-NewYawker
09-22-2010, 8:59 AM
Look for any CRACKS in the receiver.

Barabas
09-22-2010, 9:13 AM
Buy some ammo.

xrMike
09-22-2010, 9:31 AM
Break down, inspect, clean, & grease.Yep, places to grease are pictured here:

http://www.nicolausassociates.com/PDF/M1GarandRifleGreasePoints.pdf

meinbruder
09-22-2010, 10:22 AM
Your M1 _____ is too old to shoot. You cannot find ammo for it anymore. The magazines/enbloc clips are ruined, and you can't find more anywhere. The sights will be need to be inspected by a professional, as they tend to rust from lack of maintenance (M1 Garand) or poorly designed (M1 Carbine), or worse, you may get the wrong kind of people gathering near it (M1 Thompson SMG). Moreover, the trigger group could be worn to the point where full-auto or burst comes easily, and you know how that goes (U.S. vs Olfsen). The bolt will drop prematurely on a worn Garand, which means you can't load without getting Garand Thumb (proud recipient of the award), or close without loading a round (Carbine), or slamfire (Thompson). The wood will soon crack and fall off by the 10th shot fired, since the evaporation of water from the wood means that it cracks easier.

You really should hand it off to a trained professional in dealing with illegal weapons. But I can offer you $50 to accelerate the process and clear your record.

All that makes perfect sense to me. I wonder why? :rolleyes:

dakinejb
09-22-2010, 1:12 PM
Thanks guys

SoCal Bob
09-22-2010, 1:52 PM
If your M1 is a Garand then you need to be aware that most modern .30-06 ammo can damage the Op Rod as well as other serious issues. American Eagle makes a round designed to the specs of the old M2 Ball ammo (AE3006M1). If you use modern ammo the general recommendation is that you stick with 150 gr rounds and should probably buy an adjustable gas plug like the one made by Schuster. Here is a link to a video on Youtube that shows how to adjust the gas plug. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFyUhSwIcMw

M1A Rifleman
09-22-2010, 1:55 PM
If your M1 is a Garand then you need to be aware that most modern .30-06 ammo can damage the Op Rod as well as other serious issues. American Eagle makes a round designed to the specs of the old M2 Ball ammo (AE3006M1). If you use modern ammo the general recommendation is that you stick with 150 gr rounds and should probably buy an adjustable gas plug like the one made by Schuster. Here is a link to a video on Youtube that shows how to adjust the gas plug. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFyUhSwIcMw

Some GI M2 Ball ammo will always be a best choice, however use of modern ammo within the 150 grn range has also not been proved to damage rifles either. Federal American Eagle 150 grn has a velocity similar to M2 Ball the last time I looked.

railroader
09-22-2010, 6:04 PM
Definitely clean and inspect. I got a 1903a3 a few years back. When I went clean and oil it before I shot it I found a bullet stuck in the barrel. Mark

supermario
09-22-2010, 6:26 PM
My dad gave me an M1 that he had stored for 20yrs and he just sprayed it down with WD40 and guess what, it was in perfect shape. Not a spot of rust, the wood looked perfect. I remember some people say not to use WD40, I disagree! I think it if was stored properly oils, it will be like it was 20yrs ago, mine was.

brianinca
09-22-2010, 9:43 PM
>>>
check before taking it to the range
>>>

You've gotten great advice about proper cleaning and lubrication, for both the M1 Rifle (Garand) and M1 Carbine. The Garand is a "grease" gun, pay heed. I find the USGI M1 Carbine to run best with a modicum of grease, as well. I can't address the commercial variants due to their distortion of the breed.

It is absolutely NOT correct to shoot "150 grain ammo" in the Garand, it was designed to shoot USGI Ball M1 and M2, which hasn't anything to do with SAMMI spec 30-06 Springfield ammo. Either buy CMP M2 (widely available from NON-CMP sources) or get some of the Hornady match ammo for Garands. Better yet, reload!

For both M1 Garands and M1 Carbines, a new set of springs is a good and inexpensive investment. Wolff makes a kit for both, I wouldn't recommend them. Various online sources for spring sets are available, you want USGI spec for them. Orion 7 is a good starting point.

>>>
Not a spot of rust, the wood looked perfect. I remember some people say not to use WD40, I disagree!
>>>

Well, you're mistaken, but I'm glad your Dad lived in a low-humidity environment and the Garand was cleaned of any remaining corrosive primer residue before storage. Using WD40 on your firearms is a poor maintenance practice. WD = Water Displacement, it was designed to purge water from the tube electronics in the Atlas missiles launched from Vandenberg. They didn't care about the crappy residue it left behind after drying, which had no lubricant properties, let alone rust preventative properties.

Regards,
Brian in CA

reidnez
09-23-2010, 8:48 AM
All good advice. To add a bit to the ammo discussion, he is right: bullet weight is not really the primary concern. It's actually the powder that is the culprit. M2 ball has relatively fast-burning powder compared to modern commercial ammo--this means that once the gas makes it to the port at the business end of the barrel, it has already lost some energy and is at a relatively lower pressure. Conversely, commercial powders are slower-burning, which causes higher port pressure.

The M1's operating rod is hollow, completely free-floating and designed with a subtle bend in it. With higher port pressures, you *can* tweak an op-rod. You will hear all kinds of stories of people who have done it for years, or swear by a particular kind of ammo, or dismiss the idea altogether. All I'll say is, it's your rifle and op-rods aren't so cheap. I shoot only M2 ball, or loads specifically designed for the Garand.

In my experience, *all* weapons prefer grease. People seem to have gotten into the habit of using only CLP (or other oil) because that's all the military issues. Must be good enough, right? Not really...oil doesn't like to stay where you put it and it's just not viscous enough for major bearing surfaces. High-temperature auto bearing grease has always served me well. It's about $7 for a tub which will last even the most avid shooter years. No need to shell out for exotic "firearms-specific" stuff...friction is friction.

>>>
check before taking it to the range
>>>

You've gotten great advice about proper cleaning and lubrication, for both the M1 Rifle (Garand) and M1 Carbine. The Garand is a "grease" gun, pay heed. I find the USGI M1 Carbine to run best with a modicum of grease, as well. I can't address the commercial variants due to their distortion of the breed.

It is absolutely NOT correct to shoot "150 grain ammo" in the Garand, it was designed to shoot USGI Ball M1 and M2, which hasn't anything to do with SAMMI spec 30-06 Springfield ammo. Either buy CMP M2 (widely available from NON-CMP sources) or get some of the Hornady match ammo for Garands. Better yet, reload!

For both M1 Garands and M1 Carbines, a new set of springs is a good and inexpensive investment. Wolff makes a kit for both, I wouldn't recommend them. Various online sources for spring sets are available, you want USGI spec for them. Orion 7 is a good starting point.

>>>
Not a spot of rust, the wood looked perfect. I remember some people say not to use WD40, I disagree!
>>>

Well, you're mistaken, but I'm glad your Dad lived in a low-humidity environment and the Garand was cleaned of any remaining corrosive primer residue before storage. Using WD40 on your firearms is a poor maintenance practice. WD = Water Displacement, it was designed to purge water from the tube electronics in the Atlas missiles launched from Vandenberg. They didn't care about the crappy residue it left behind after drying, which had no lubricant properties, let alone rust preventative properties.

Regards,
Brian in CA

M1A Rifleman
09-23-2010, 9:00 AM
For all the nay sayers about using modern commercial ammo - what do you think was successfully used in surplus M1's for years before bulk surplus was available? I have not seen any busted M1's from commercial ammo use, but I've seen many from poor reloads and use of turd-world surplus.

Commercial ammo within the 150 range will be fine, and this opinion has been in print for many years, infact I found a 20 year old article on this subject last night.

Here is a recent NRA opinion - see attached.

CSDGuy
09-23-2010, 9:15 AM
For the OP: Clean it and lube it properly. Make CERTAIN the bore is clear. If all you have is commercial ammo, as long as it's in the 150gr range, it should be OK. The best stuff to use is the ammo that is specifically loaded to be Garand-Safe. American Eagle, Federal GMM, Hornady, and Black Hills Gold all make Garand-Safe ammunition commercially.

I reload... so I have to be pretty careful to load properly. Of course, I can also load for the best accuracy for MY rifle. ;)

brianinca
09-23-2010, 10:01 AM
>>>
what do you think was successfully used in surplus M1's for years before bulk surplus was available?
>>>

???? Are you serious?

I bought my first Garand in '92, and I shot 400 rds of surplus M2 AP through it before I started reloading again. 3006 surplus was widely available back in the 60's, my Dad used to pay $1/100 (penny a round). What, did you think the Greek HXP surplus was all there was?

That's a factually incorrect letter from the NRA telling you to shoot commercial ammo. Since they can't get their facts straight (look up M1 Ball specs for yourself), you can shoot whatever you want in your rifles.

Regards,
Brian in CA

Bhobbs
09-23-2010, 12:15 PM
I bought Mil Spec lubriplate to use on my M1 and immediately I could tell there was a major improvement. It operated smoother, ejects properly instead of all over the place and feels nicer when you shoot it. I would recommend getting some. I found it on the Brownell's website.