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View Full Version : Making CA-compliant threaded barrels 10+ round mags


gose
05-18-2006, 2:50 PM
I've been trying to locate any info on what is needed to be done to a threaded barrel and standard capacity mags to conform to CA laws, ie no threads and 10 round capacity.

Is it 'once a threaded barrel always a threaded barrel', or can I simply file off the threads?

What are the requirements for turning a mag permanently into a 10 round capacity?

To make it clear... Im not in possession of any illegal mags or barrels and want to know what I have to do to my barrels and mags (currently stored abroad) to be able to get them into the state/country.

Are there any additional federal laws I need to watch out for? (except the whole form 6 stuff to import them)

GTKrockeTT
05-18-2006, 2:56 PM
having a threaded barrel on a rifle is fine, just don't have a flash hider.

gose
05-18-2006, 3:00 PM
Guess I should have stated that the barrel is for a handgun (and so are the mags).

xenophobe
05-18-2006, 3:02 PM
Yes, if you mill the threads off you should be fine.

bwiese
05-18-2006, 3:03 PM
For rifles CA has NO issues w/threaded barrels. The AW issues w/threaded bbls were ONLY for the now-sunset Federal AW ban.

(For semiauto centerfire pistols, a threaded bbl triggers AW status.)

All you need to do is have your barrel be at least 16" long. If it's _shorter_ than 16" only then do you need permanently attached muzzle device.

So threads are a nonissue.

If you legally have hicap mags (i.e., had them before 2000) I'd recommend not destroying them. (If you got them after 1/1/2000 you shouldn't have 'em at all). They could come in handy if everything falls right ;)

Get the 10rd magazines out there. The Bushmasters seem OK and hang down like 20 rounders...

gose
05-18-2006, 3:34 PM
Like I thought then... Just need to figure out how to convert the mags.

Form 6 time again! :)

Stanze
05-18-2006, 4:10 PM
I black gaffer taped(used by the film/audio/visual industry; like duct tape, but easier to remove without sticky gunk) two 10 Round Bushmaster mags together, the entire "assembly" sticks out of the mag well as much as a 30 rounder and can reload 10 rounds as fast you can read this.:D

sierratangofoxtrotunion
05-19-2006, 4:46 PM
Yes, if you lathe the threads off you should be fine.
Fixed it for ya

onley11
05-19-2006, 8:48 PM
Concrete answer.

Mag can't come into your possesion in california whole.

It could come into nevada whole, go into pieces (repair parts) and ship into california in two boxes, neither box having enough parts to complete a mag.

Before assembly, you would have to PERMANENTLY render the 23 rounder into a 10 rounder. As in converting back would destroy the magazine.

As I see it, you never imported a high capacity mag into california(only parts), and never assembled a high cap magazine. Since you can have the pieces, and you can make a regular cap mag, with no state construtive possession, you're cool.

Bad people do a process similar to this, but skip a key step, and end up with a legal device, since possession isn't regulated, but they are bad and you shouldn't do this.:eek:

I'm not a lawer and don't pretend to be, so I could be wrong. Don't sue me.:rolleyes:

ke6guj
05-20-2006, 12:05 AM
"Originally Posted by xenophobe
Yes, if you lathe the threads off you should be fine."

Fixed it for ya

Did it really need to be fixed? :confused: I could use a mill or a lathe to do that job decently enough.

NeoWeird
05-20-2006, 12:18 AM
Yeah, if you dropped the chamber end on parallels, put something soft around the barrel, clamped down, square it up and then dropped the end mill the dropped depth you could mill off the threads.

And if you are going to correct someone, correction them properly. It would be "turn" not "lathe". :D

ETA: If it's a bull barrle, or the same width the whole length, it would probably be better to rest the barrel along the parallels so the muzzle is outside the vice on one side. You can then mill using the sides of the end mill and you could have as much barrel vibration, or the pulling which could unseat the barrel and cause a disaster.

ke6guj
05-20-2006, 12:29 AM
I was thinking about using my rotary table with a 3-jaw chuck on it. I could mount the rotary table so that the barrel would be sticking out vertically or horizontally. Then, use an end-mill to mill the threads off while rotating the barrel around 360* to get a full cut.

gose
06-01-2006, 6:07 PM
Is there anything written about how the modification to the mag should be done, or is 'permanent' the only thing that exists in writing?

Glock22Fan
06-01-2006, 8:50 PM
Bad people do a process similar to this, but skip a key step, and end up with a legal device, since possession isn't regulated, but they are bad and you shouldn't do this.:eek:



I've heard two versions of this. Version 1 said that the law had a loophole, so that while a hi-cap mag cannot be imported into, sold, purchased or whatever in California, it wasn't illegal to manufacture one from parts. The second version said that such manufacturing was illegal, and I think I've seen the regulations that support this view somewhere around.

However, in practise, what's to stop someone going to Nevada, or wherever, and bying a hi-cap mag and then bringing it back with him/her (in parts or whole)? Maybe technically illegal, but the chances of getting caught crossing the border are zilch, and then one can say "Well, I've had it since before the ban!" Or, do they date-stamp some magazines?

OTOH, it could be a problem in court, as the prosecutor could talk about "Cop Killer bullets in a banned Assault-Weapon magazine." Load of bull puckey, but the jury could be swayed.

gose
06-02-2006, 8:23 AM
I've heard two versions of this. Version 1 said that the law had a loophole, so that while a hi-cap mag cannot be imported into, sold, purchased or whatever in California, it wasn't illegal to manufacture one from parts. The second version said that such manufacturing was illegal, and I think I've seen the regulations that support this view somewhere around.

However, in practise, what's to stop someone going to Nevada, or wherever, and bying a hi-cap mag and then bringing it back with him/her (in parts or whole)? Maybe technically illegal, but the chances of getting caught crossing the border are zilch, and then one can say "Well, I've had it since before the ban!" Or, do they date-stamp some magazines?

OTOH, it could be a problem in court, as the prosecutor could talk about "Cop Killer bullets in a banned Assault-Weapon magazine." Load of bull puckey, but the jury could be swayed.

Date stamps doesn't matter, since its perfectly ok to replace a broken mag body you had in your possession before the ban with a new date stamped one.

artherd
06-02-2006, 11:06 AM
I've heard two versions of this. Version 1 said that the law had a loophole, so that while a hi-cap mag cannot be imported into, sold, purchased or whatever in California, it wasn't illegal to manufacture one from parts.
WRONG, the manufacture of a high cap mag is illegal. It IS however legal to import parts, and REPAIR an existing mag you legally posessed since 1/1/2000. You may not make a NEW MAG.

Glock22Fan
06-02-2006, 12:07 PM
Thanks for a definitive answer. Much appreciated.

Reminds me though of the old tale:

"We've had this axe in the family for a hundred years. Of course, we've had to replace either the blade or the handle a number of times over the years, that's why it looks so new."