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View Full Version : Places to hunt coyotes near Reno,NV


F4E Phantom
05-16-2006, 1:16 PM
Can any fellow members recommend a place to hunt coyotes say 2hrs from Reno, on the Neveda side. Is it currently too hot for good hunting? Thanks

Nahuatl
05-29-2006, 11:29 AM
Most sport hunters take a break from March 1 to Aug 1 to allow the coyotes to den and whelp. The nice thing about coyote is the long season and no bag limit, but it's always nice to have a big group of young dumb ones in the fall. ADC hunters, on the other hand, can find shooting a PG ***** a judicious use of ammo, since a pair are even more likely to be after calves and lambs in the spring and summer to feed their brood. As for heat, it's always hot til it's not, and daylight hunting can be brutal anywhere in the state til fall. We hunt at night with a spotlight to beat the heat. Lots of great hunting around Reno and in all directions from there, but there's a lot of hunting competition too. Lots of hunters work that area. Very few active hunters post on the web, so you won't know it from what you read on the net, but some of the sporting goods or even feed 'n seed stores will be good sources of info on spots and conditions. Do some social engineering. You'd be surprised how few hunters actually get up the gumption to ask landowners for permission to hunt. If you'll print up some business cards and do a little ADC work in the spring, you'll get some favorable responses, invites back if you show off your kill (ranchers love it), and the opportunity to hunt private land in the fall when conditions are better, fur's prime, but the need isn't so great from the landowners' standpoints. Most of the regulars spend time on gear, marksmanship, and other activities during the summer months and leave the coyotes alone. I sure won't give you any grief for hunting in the "off season." To each his own.

I suspect you're new at coyotes, because I can drive down a road and see a hundred good stands while someone unfamiliar with the territory would still be wondering where to hunt. In that neck of the woods, there are coyotes everywhere.

Edit: Hunting can be good in the summer, early, late, and at night. The worst thing about hunting in summer is the bugs. The flies, gnats, ants, and ticks can make sitting still impossible. I'll give you a few ideas for hunting opportunities, but these are not secrets. No one is going to post their honey holes on the web. If I were going to hunt coyotes north of Reno, I'd head just to the northern edge of Pyramid Indian reservation and scout the Fox Range for the deer herd. This area holds decent deer populutions. I'd hunt at night and use a mix of bird and fawn distress. I'd also make sure I had a mountain lion tag. If I were hunting east of Reno, I'd go to either Fernley WMA or Stillwater WMA. Both of these are on the western flyway. Rabbit distress and waterfowl distress will both draw coyote action, even in daylight. The coyotes are wary here because the duck and goose hunters aren't shy about peppering the coyotes in the fall, and they hear a lot of call sounds, both predator and waterfowl. Additionally hunting at the edge of agriculture is always good and so are cattle feed yards. Coyotes mouse these areas at dawn and dusk and setting an ambush over a bone pit night or day can be extremely productive. I carry both a scoped rifle and a shotgun and use the scattergun in tight cover, or when I'm calling for rifleman. Several times last season coyotes got all the way in without my rifleman seeing them, and I got some up close and personal action using Hevi-shot Dead Coyote. Dead Coyote is amazing ammo and though I usually wait til they've got their noses in the speaker, kills at 50-60 are possible. It patterns and kills better than any ammo I've ever used.

Python2
05-29-2006, 5:48 PM
Most sport hunters take a break from March 1 to Aug 1 to allow the coyotes to den and whelp. The nice thing about coyote is the long season and no bag limit, but it's always nice to have a big group of young dumb ones in the fall. ADC hunters, on the other hand, can find shooting a PG ***** a judicious use of ammo, since a pair are even more likely to be after calves and lambs in the spring and summer to feed their brood. As for heat, it's always hot til it's not, and daylight hunting can be brutal anywhere in the state til fall. We hunt at night with a spotlight to beat the heat. Lots of great hunting around Reno and in all directions from there, but there's a lot of hunting competition too. Lots of hunters work that area. Very few active hunters post on the web, so you won't know it from what you read on the net, but some of the sporting goods or even feed 'n seed stores will be good sources of info on spots and conditions. Do some social engineering. You'd be surprised how few hunters actually get up the gumption to ask landowners for permission to hunt. If you'll print up some business cards and do a little ADC work in the spring, you'll get some favorable responses, invites back if you show off your kill (ranchers love it), and the opportunity to hunt private land in the fall when conditions are better, fur's prime, but the need isn't so great from the landowners' standpoints. Most of the regulars spend time on gear, marksmanship, and other activities during the summer months and leave the coyotes alone. I sure won't give you any grief for hunting in the "off season." To each his own.

I suspect you're new at coyotes, because I can drive down a road and see a hundred good stands while someone unfamiliar with the territory would still be wondering where to hunt. In that neck of the woods, there are coyotes everywhere.

Man oh man, with your long post, you just made me salivate. So...what in the world is an ADC and a PG *****? You sound like a heck of Coyote hunter.:D Wish I have friends like you I could go hunting with. :o

Nahuatl
05-30-2006, 8:18 AM
Thanks for the compliment. I shot my first coyote in '75 with a .357 revolver and I've been building e-callers for a long time, the first from a Craig 8-track. I enjoy the long season and liberal bag associated with predator calling.

ADC = Animal Damage Control... In the spring, calves and lambs fall prey to coyotes with regularity, so ranchers are always looking for a few coyote experts to put the hurt on them. So, in the spring, there are two schools of thought. If you hunt in competitions for points you want as many dogs as possible to survive until contest time. You don't shoot a pregnant female, because you want her litter to survive the spring and summer = more targets in hunting season. If you're a rancher, screw that. Shooting a pregnant female means you can kill the whole litter with a single shot.

So when the club hunts end in February, I usually shift gears. There's a lot of maintenance and mowing I do in spring and summer. But occasionally, if the groundwork was done right the year before, one of the big cattle ranchers in NV will call when his cows are dropping calves and ***** about his coyote problem. That's when you load the pickup and go for a few days.

Spotlighting is a hoot. It's not uncommon to see a dozen set of eyes on a single stand. Coyotes really drop their guard at night. Shooting at night takes practice and teamwork.

There are clubs in OC, Victorville, Riverside, Bakersfield, and Sacramento (and maybe one in San Gabriel) that are open to and welcome new members. I have more fun calling for novices and watching them get pumped up than anything else. I posted a little more info on my club in another thread called "Coyote hunting in SoCal."

While no rifle is too big for SoCal coyotes, .223 and .22-250 are ideal. And if you're not saving fur, .243/6mm has a bit more range, handles the wind, and knocks em down a bit better. Bolt guns are the norm, but I'm going to hunt with a 6.5 Grendel a bit this season. Most shooting is done in the dark, and it's done from a California rig, which would take some more explanation. Better seen than typed on. Imagine sitting in a closet and loading/unloading your weapon a few times without making any noise and you'll get the idea. There are about 100 dedicated coyote hunters in SoCal, all ages, all levels of experience, and they share information. We're always looking for a few new members.

Python2
05-30-2006, 2:41 PM
Thanks for the compliment. I shot my first coyote in '75 with a .357 revolver and I've been building e-callers for a long time, the first from a Craig 8-track. I enjoy the long season and liberal bag associated with predator calling.

ADC = Animal Damage Control... In the spring, calves and lambs fall prey to coyotes with regularity, so ranchers are always looking for a few coyote experts to put the hurt on them. So, in the spring, there are two schools of thought. If you hunt in competitions for points you want as many dogs as possible to survive until contest time. You don't shoot a pregnant female, because you want her litter to survive the spring and summer = more targets in hunting season. If you're a rancher, screw that. Shooting a pregnant female means you can kill the whole litter with a single shot.

So when the club hunts end in February, I usually shift gears. There's a lot of maintenance and mowing I do in spring and summer. But occasionally, if the groundwork was done right the year before, one of the big cattle ranchers in NV will call when his cows are dropping calves and ***** about his coyote problem. That's when you load the pickup and go for a few days.

Spotlighting is a hoot. It's not uncommon to see a dozen set of eyes on a single stand. Coyotes really drop their guard at night. Shooting at night takes practice and teamwork.

There are clubs in OC, Victorville, Riverside, Bakersfield, and Sacramento (and maybe one in San Gabriel) that are open to and welcome new members. I have more fun calling for novices and watching them get pumped up than anything else. I posted a little more info on my club in another thread called "Coyote hunting in SoCal."

While no rifle is too big for SoCal coyotes, .223 and .22-250 are ideal. And if you're not saving fur, .243/6mm has a bit more range, handles the wind, and knocks em down a bit better. Bolt guns are the norm, but I'm going to hunt with a 6.5 Grendel a bit this season. Most shooting is done in the dark, and it's done from a California rig, which would take some more explanation. Better seen than typed on. Imagine sitting in a closet and loading/unloading your weapon a few times without making any noise and you'll get the idea. There are about 100 dedicated coyote hunters in SoCal, all ages, all levels of experience, and they share information. We're always looking for a few new members.

Dang! too bad you are in So. Cal. Anyone out here in the North? You mentioned Sacramento. That is close enough for me on the way to Reno. I have a 22-250 Browning raring to go.

Rob454
05-30-2006, 4:13 PM
I usually go out and hunt coyotes up in bakersfield area. I usually get one everytime I go oout. The last couple I got in broad daylight. One my buddy got with a 30-06. we were coming over the ridge of a hill and there he was. he saw us and took off running my buddy yells Coyote. and i yell back well smoke 'im. He dropped it with his second shot. it was abotu 350 yards and he was running. the other one was on a dirt road. We were driving. One of my buddies yells coyote and I slammed on the brakes ran to the back and got my 9mm and started popping. My buddies pile out and they all start blasting. When we walked up to it we basically tore him to shreds. not pretty but he was a dead. the last one was this past weekend. Again on a dirt road I was loading up the shotgun and i saw the coyote try to run up the hill. I pulled out my 44 mag and popped him with my 2nd round.

I dont hunt coyotes for sport or anything. I was asked by the local ranchers If I see one to destroy it. I was also asked by the local rangers to destroy them also. i guess theire having some major problems with the coyotes up there
Rob

Unknownassailant
05-30-2006, 4:37 PM
You guys are talking about the 4 legged coyotes right??? :p

Nahuatl
06-01-2006, 5:17 AM
I'm going to back off this thread, since it was started on a separate topic. I'll put some information up on the Sacramento Club in the other thread I started on Coyote hunting.

coolvarmint
06-02-2006, 7:33 PM
Plus one on north of Pyramid. Like Nahuatl said pretty well hunted areas. Lotsa hunters in the Reno area. If you dont mind driving a little bit more the Gerlach area is great and insanely open. There is so much public land it gives non Nevadan BLM'envy. You cant go wrong with any of the areas Nahuatl said. He is a wealth of info. Try Predatormastersforums.com for great info on predator hunting. And the Sacramento club like he said is another great place to start. Good luck. Scott

Python2
06-03-2006, 1:57 PM
I'm going to back off this thread, since it was started on a separate topic. I'll put some information up on the Sacramento Club in the other thread I started on Coyote hunting.

Nahuatl, I cant find the thread on Sacramento Club.

Nahuatl
06-03-2006, 7:06 PM
The Sacramento club has their very own website at CaliforniaPredatorsClub.com

One of their members, Scott, posted also on this thread http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=34850

Good Hunting!