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ocspeedracer
09-03-2010, 1:47 PM
What is the current lbs for the recoil spring? My TRS is about a year old, and yes I did google the answer but the only reliable result I found was from 2001, and a lot can change in that time.

Thanks.

IceMan711
09-03-2010, 1:52 PM
From what I understand, it is a Wolff 18.5# variable spring.

Of course, the best answer is to call them.

ocspeedracer
09-03-2010, 1:59 PM
thank you... I will probably call after work...kinda wanted to just order it online from work though.

viet4lifeOC
09-03-2010, 2:03 PM
What is the current lbs for the recoil spring? My TRS is about a year old, and yes I did google the answer but the only reliable result I found was from 2001, and a lot can change in that time.

Thanks.


I'm shopping around for a Les Baer. Proload has them for $1800 and change. How much did you pay for yours? How do you like the TRS? Did any upgrades? etc any advice?

ocspeedracer
09-03-2010, 2:17 PM
Buy it! I love mine, it's been the best 1911 I've ever shot! i paid more than that after DROS and the gun stores $75 dollar fee. Don't remember exactly but probably just under $2k.

Like everyone says they are super tight and require the tool to take down. I personally love how tight it is, like a virgin. Frankly, if i'm paying that much for a gun it better fit tight and feel like a gun smith poored hours of work into it. It's been 100% reliable.

viet4lifeOC
09-03-2010, 2:55 PM
Buy it! I love mine, it's been the best 1911 I've ever shot! i paid more than that after DROS and the gun stores $75 dollar fee. Don't remember exactly but probably just under $2k.

Like everyone says they are super tight and require the tool to take down. I personally love how tight it is, like a virgin. Frankly, if i'm paying that much for a gun it better fit tight and feel like a gun smith poored hours of work into it. It's been 100% reliable.

Didn't know this, but what tools do you need to disassemble it? a bushing wrench?

Did you change the stock grips on yours? The grips are the only thing that I might want to change...maybe VZ grips.

ocspeedracer
09-03-2010, 2:57 PM
ya, just a bushing wrench.
I thought i'd change the grips too, but alas, after shooting it i thought not.

Black Majik
09-03-2010, 2:59 PM
Wolff 18.5# variable spring.


Winner winner chicken dinner! Ding ding ding!

viet4lifeOC
09-03-2010, 3:01 PM
Thanks for the advice.

I had two guns on my want list:

the CZ 75 SP-01 and the Les Baer TRS...decided to buy the CZ first (ordered two days ago) because I read prices on the CZ was going up. Not sure, but it doesn't really matter. Buying the TRS next..hoping price on it falls a little more.

thanks for the advice...can't wait to get the TRS.

sirgiles
09-03-2010, 3:27 PM
never needed a bushing wrench for a 18.5 wolf spring on any of my les baers. just push down with a finger on the recoil spring plunger.

ocspeedracer
09-03-2010, 3:30 PM
lol, yes i can do that...but i can't move the bushing without it.:punk:

hitteam
09-03-2010, 4:53 PM
lol, yes i can do that...but i can't move the bushing without it.:punk:

+1 The bushing is so tight, hard to turn it without a bushing wrench.

sirgiles
09-03-2010, 5:07 PM
my bad. i now remember that when the pistols were new, i did use a bushing wrench.

Swoop
09-03-2010, 5:52 PM
Nice

redcliff
09-03-2010, 8:58 PM
It's best if you retract the slide a bit to loosen up the bushing on the barrel before removing the bushing. Yes it makes the spring a bit harder to push in but its not hard with a non-marring bushing wrench to help control the spring plug till your thumb can take over.

On my Springfield Pro I use a chamber flag to lock the slide out of battery far enough so that the bushing can be turned easily and not whipe any more clearance in the barrel to bushing fit then necesary. I reinstall it the same way.

It's not necesary on most production fit bushings but custom fit bushings will appreciate it imho.

Gress
09-04-2010, 8:01 PM
Useful read from Wolff's site:
1. What is the difference between conventional and variable recoil springs?

The difference is both physical and operational. On a conventional spring, all the coils are spaced equally apart, except for the closed ends. In a variable recoil spring the space varies between coils with less space between coils at one end and more space between coils at the other end. The way the springs store energy is also different. For example if a conventional recoil spring is compressed 1/2", it might store 1 pound of energy. For every additional 1/2" this spring is compressed it would then store 1 additional pound of energy. When a variable recoil spring is compressed 1/2", it might store 1/4 pound of energy. The next half inch of compression might store 1/2 pound, the next half inch might store 3/4 pound and so on. In other words, a conventional spring stores energy on a straight line and a variable spring stores energy on a curve. If both springs are rated at 16 pounds, they will both store 16 pounds when compressed to the same working length, but the way they get to 16 pounds is different.




2. Should I use a conventional or variable spring when both are available?

The choice is often very subjective. Variable recoil springs reduce the battery load values with increasingly greater recoil load values. This results in easier unlocking, improved recoil energy storage, dampening, feeding, breaching and lockup. Variable recoil springs are particularly beneficial with compensated pistols and when using light target loads where less recoil energy is available. Conventional recoil springs are particularly beneficial when shooting heavier loads where keeping the slide closed as long as possible is desired. The "correct type" of recoil spring is best determined through experimentation and your own personal preference.




3. How heavy should my recoil spring be? What weight recoil spring should I use with a particular load?

These are two very hard questions to answer in exact terms and in most cases an exact answer is not possible. There are many factors which influence the correct weight recoil spring to use. These factors include the particular ammunition brand and load, individual pistol characteristics, individual shooting styles and your individual, subjective feeling of how the gun shoots and should feel. In general terms, the heaviest recoil spring that will allow the pistol to function reliably is the best choice - tempered by the above factors. If your casings are hitting the ground in the 3 to 6 foot range, then the recoil spring is approximately correct. If you are ejecting beyond the 6-8 foot range, then a heavier recoil spring is generally required. If your casings are ejecting less than 3 feet a lighter recoil spring may be needed to assure proper functioning. Taking these factors into consideration, it then comes down to how the gun feels and performs when shooting - in your judgment. Using too light a recoil spring can result in damage to the pistol and possible injury to you.




4. How often should I change my springs?

Wolff Gunsprings are made with the highest grade materials and workmanship. Most Wolff [recoil] springs will remain stable for many thousands of rounds. The performance of your gun is the best indicator of when a spring needs to be replaced. Factors such as increasing ejection distance, improper ejection and/or breaching, lighter hammer indents on primers, misfires, poor cartridge feeding from magazines, frequent jams, stove pipes and other malfunctions are all possible indications of fatigued springs or improper springs. Springs that are subject to higher stress applications such as magazine springs, striker springs and recoil springs will require more frequent replacement than other less stressed springs. Most Wolff recoil springs should be capable of 3000-5000 rounds minimum before changing is required. Some recoil springs in compact pistols, especially where dual springs are replaced by a single spring may require changing after 750 - 1500 rounds. Changes in your firearm's performance are one of the best indicators that a change is needed.

Psypher
09-04-2010, 8:22 PM
Thanks for the advice.

I had two guns on my want list:

the CZ 75 SP-01 and the Les Baer TRS...decided to buy the CZ first (ordered two days ago) because I read prices on the CZ was going up. Not sure, but it doesn't really matter. Buying the TRS next..hoping price on it falls a little more.

thanks for the advice...can't wait to get the TRS.

Baers prices went up this year and there are talks it will go up again either next year or the year after. Just FYI. :)

immaculate
09-05-2010, 3:54 AM
Baers prices went up this year and there are talks it will go up again either next year or the year after. Just FYI. :)

i'll second that. FYI the prices seem to go up almost every year or every other year. When I bought my TRS it was under $1600. that was in...2006 I think?

aaron