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f33dback
09-02-2010, 3:41 PM
I've been looking for some optics to sight in my rifle as well as general use, which is why I settled on binoculars, I was wondering if anyone here uses them and has any advice, this is the one I am looking at currently (http://www.binoculars.com/binoculars/spectator-binoculars/bushnell20x50powerviewbinoculars.cfm?source=google aw&kwid=bushnell%20powerview%2020x50%20super%20high%2 0powered%20surveillance%20binoculars&tid=exact)

the 20 times seems high but since they will be dual use I'm thinking more is better here.

Any ideas?

killshot44
09-02-2010, 3:53 PM
20 Power isn't high, comparatively speaking...You'll find more magnification available in a spotting scope. I wouldn't go lower than 50X, but that's me.

With glass, you DO get what you pay for. To get high quality binoculars, you'll be spending much more for the same magnification than you would for a spotting scope.

What distance will your maximum use be? That should be your first consideration.

(If you max is not beyond, say 300yds, why not just get a scope that you can see your hits with?)

f33dback
09-02-2010, 3:55 PM
I think 300 yards is going to be my limit with an SU 16CA, I have been looking at spotting scopes but I want to backpack it to for general use, if you think a spotting scope is good to go for that use I will look into them.

But really 50X? is that for 1000 yards?

erratikmind
09-02-2010, 4:11 PM
I find that binoculars are difficult to hold steady to view shots, unless the said is set-up on a stand of sorts. Taking a leaner/rest with a pair of binoculars takes up too much time and is quite cumbersome.

When I shoot, I prefer to use a 20 to 60 x 60mm spotting scope, which is set up and directed at the target. Without much effort, I divert my eyes in to the spotting scope, which is placed at my right side, and I can instantly see and evaluate the shots fired.

I only walk down range to change and mark targets, as required.

f33dback
09-02-2010, 4:24 PM
I find that binoculars are difficult to hold steady to view shots, unless the said is set-up on a stand of sorts. Taking a leaner/rest with a pair of binoculars takes up too much time and is quite cumbersome.

When I shoot, I prefer to use a 20 to 60 x 60mm spotting scope, which is set up and directed at the target. Without much effort, I divert my eyes in to the spotting scope, which is placed at my right side, and I can instantly see and evaluate the shots fired.

I only walk down range to change and mark targets, as required.


I agree with what you're saying but I want something for general use (girls in bikinis, checking the neighbors, etc) and I'm looking for something you can hold in your hand and still have it be usable.

I checked some spotters and found a nice one (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0033833712427a&type=product&cmCat=cchart_spotting_scopes)(for the price)
but kinda long to carry around in the forest.

erratikmind
09-02-2010, 4:35 PM
I agree with what you're saying but I want something for general use (girls in bikinis, checking the neighbors, etc) and I'm looking for something you can hold in your hand and still have it be usable.

I checked some spotters and found a nice one (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0033833712427a&type=product&cmCat=cchart_spotting_scopes)(for the price)
but kinda long to carry around in the forest.

Yes, I understand your point of view. When I go backpacking, I use a simple and small pair of Bushnell 10x25 binoculars.

Ultimately, you have the final decision based on your needs and budget.

Ummm . . . I have no prior experience . . . But, I have heard that a spotting scope on a tripod is excellent for viewing the neighbors, which I am not an advocate of, if you know what I mean. :p

badlandsbutch
09-02-2010, 4:54 PM
Anything over 10X requires a stand because of shakiness.

f33dback
09-02-2010, 7:18 PM
Thanks guys (and gals?)

CoyoteHunter555
09-02-2010, 7:52 PM
You can use a spotting scope camping, hunting, at the game, at the range, off the Eiffel Tower, out of the house ;), etc they're extremely versatile.

Bigtwin
09-02-2010, 8:06 PM
I thought the same thing. I figured my good binoculars would be just fine......until I brought them to the range, what a pain in the arse! That is how I ended up owning a spotting scope.

killshot44
09-02-2010, 8:16 PM
But really 50X? is that for 1000 yards?

Yup......

For what your followup post says, stay with Binos, spend a hundred or so and you'll be fine.

CoyoteHunter555
09-02-2010, 8:21 PM
I am not much of a binocular person, especially since I hardly see out of my right eye. I would rather pay for one optic rather than splitting the same money into two

CoyoteHunter555
09-03-2010, 7:30 PM
What did you decide?

Fate
09-03-2010, 9:04 PM
I thought the same thing. I figured my good binoculars would be just fine......until I brought them to the range, what a pain in the arse! That is how I ended up owning a spotting scope.

Me too!

smittty
09-03-2010, 11:50 PM
I've been looking for some optics to sight in my rifle as well as general use, which is why I settled on binoculars, I was wondering if anyone here uses them and has any advice, this is the one I am looking at currently (http://www.binoculars.com/binoculars/spectator-binoculars/bushnell20x50powerviewbinoculars.cfm?source=google aw&kwid=bushnell%20powerview%2020x50%20super%20high%2 0powered%20surveillance%20binoculars&tid=exact)

the 20 times seems high but since they will be dual use I'm thinking more is better here.

Any ideas?

Those binocs will probably do just fine for sighting in but they are too high magnification for most other uses. Anything over 8x is difficult to hold steady and will strain your eyes giving you a headache in very short time. For this reason I suggest a wide angle 8x binocular.

A very very good spotting scope is the Bushnell Excursion FLP 15-45x60. Nothing comes close until you get up to the Leupold FLP spotter which it's copied after. I went thru a bunch of value priced spotters and this Bushnell is the best. Matter of fact, my friend has the expensive Leupold FLP and we both like the Bushnell better. The extra 5x magification on the Bushnell makes a difference and we can't see a difference in image quality.
http://www.opticsale.com/bushnell-excursion-flp-15-45x60-flp-zoom-spotting-2434-prd1.html

Smitty

vta
09-04-2010, 1:02 AM
i dont know if sighting in a SU-16CA at 300 yards is necessary. i would sight it in at no longer than 100 yards. those pencil barrels on the SU-16s are not going to group real tight and you will have a tough time sighting in a 300 yard zero.

CoyoteHunter555
09-04-2010, 1:04 AM
i dont know if sighting in a SU-16CA at 300 yards is necessary. i would sight it in at no longer than 100 yards. those pencil barrels on the SU-16s are not going to group real tight and you will have a tough time sighting in a 300 yard zero.

My understanding is he means he will shoot out to 300 yards, not zero

vta
09-04-2010, 1:10 AM
My understanding is he means he will shoot out to 300 yards, not zero

that makes more sense. i thought he was talking about using binoculars for sighting in from the thread title. i guess they are good for checking 300 yard targets too. i would get a spotting scope with a pretty high magnification. at least 30x. if you are shooting paper, you will want to get that scope right up on it so you know exactly what parts of the paper it is hitting.

CoyoteHunter555
09-04-2010, 1:17 AM
that makes more sense. i thought he was talking about using binoculars for sighting in from the thread title. i guess they are good for checking 300 yard targets too. i would get a spotting scope with a pretty high magnification. at least 30x. if you are shooting paper, you will want to get that scope right up on it so you know exactly what parts of the paper it is hitting.

Spotting Scope 100%