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Nodaedul
09-01-2010, 3:56 PM
My company installed a powerful computer monitoring software on our computers called Sureview. I don't like being monitored and I really want to screw with it. Any computer savvy people here have any good ideas on how to bypass/corrupt/screw with this software in any way? Im on XP professoinal and I do not have the permissions to disable the active process DLP.exe but I have most permissions and can install and remove other progams.

JDay
09-01-2010, 4:24 PM
Sounds like you want to get fired. What you want to do is also a felony.

http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=pen&group=00001-01000&file=484-502.9

502. (a) It is the intent of the Legislature in enacting this
section to expand the degree of protection afforded to individuals,
businesses, and governmental agencies from tampering, interference,
damage, and unauthorized access to lawfully created computer data and
computer systems. The Legislature finds and declares that the
proliferation of computer technology has resulted in a concomitant
proliferation of computer crime and other forms of unauthorized
access to computers, computer systems, and computer data.
The Legislature further finds and declares that protection of the
integrity of all types and forms of lawfully created computers,
computer systems, and computer data is vital to the protection of the
privacy of individuals as well as to the well-being of financial
institutions, business concerns, governmental agencies, and others
within this state that lawfully utilize those computers, computer
systems, and data.
(b) For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the
following meanings:
(1) "Access" means to gain entry to, instruct, or communicate with
the logical, arithmetical, or memory function resources of a
computer, computer system, or computer network.
(2) "Computer network" means any system that provides
communications between one or more computer systems and input/output
devices including, but not limited to, display terminals and printers
connected by telecommunication facilities.
(3) "Computer program or software" means a set of instructions or
statements, and related data, that when executed in actual or
modified form, cause a computer, computer system, or computer network
to perform specified functions.
(4) "Computer services" includes, but is not limited to, computer
time, data processing, or storage functions, or other uses of a
computer, computer system, or computer network.
(5) "Computer system" means a device or collection of devices,
including support devices and excluding calculators that are not
programmable and capable of being used in conjunction with external
files, one or more of which contain computer programs, electronic
instructions, input data, and output data, that performs functions
including, but not limited to, logic, arithmetic, data storage and
retrieval, communication, and control.
(6) "Data" means a representation of information, knowledge,
facts, concepts, computer software, computer programs or
instructions. Data may be in any form, in storage media, or as stored
in the memory of the computer or in transit or presented on a
display device.
(7) "Supporting documentation" includes, but is not limited to,
all information, in any form, pertaining to the design, construction,
classification, implementation, use, or modification of a computer,
computer system, computer network, computer program, or computer
software, which information is not generally available to the public
and is necessary for the operation of a computer, computer system,
computer network, computer program, or computer software.
(8) "Injury" means any alteration, deletion, damage, or
destruction of a computer system, computer network, computer program,
or data caused by the access, or the denial of access to legitimate
users of a computer system, network, or program.
(9) "Victim expenditure" means any expenditure reasonably and
necessarily incurred by the owner or lessee to verify that a computer
system, computer network, computer program, or data was or was not
altered, deleted, damaged, or destroyed by the access.
(10) "Computer contaminant" means any set of computer instructions
that are designed to modify, damage, destroy, record, or transmit
information within a computer, computer system, or computer network
without the intent or permission of the owner of the information.
They include, but are not limited to, a group of computer
instructions commonly called viruses or worms, that are
self-replicating or self-propagating and are designed to contaminate
other computer programs or computer data, consume computer resources,
modify, destroy, record, or transmit data, or in some other fashion
usurp the normal operation of the computer, computer system, or
computer network.
(11) "Internet domain name" means a globally unique, hierarchical
reference to an Internet host or service, assigned through
centralized Internet naming authorities, comprising a series of
character strings separated by periods, with the rightmost character
string specifying the top of the hierarchy.
(c) Except as provided in subdivision (h), any person who commits
any of the following acts is guilty of a public offense:
(1) Knowingly accesses and without permission alters, damages,
deletes, destroys, or otherwise uses any data, computer, computer
system, or computer network in order to either (A) devise or execute
any scheme or artifice to defraud, deceive, or extort, or (B)
wrongfully control or obtain money, property, or data.
(2) Knowingly accesses and without permission takes, copies, or
makes use of any data from a computer, computer system, or computer
network, or takes or copies any supporting documentation, whether
existing or residing internal or external to a computer, computer
system, or computer network.
(3) Knowingly and without permission uses or causes to be used
computer services.
(4) Knowingly accesses and without permission adds, alters,
damages, deletes, or destroys any data, computer software, or
computer programs which reside or exist internal or external to a
computer, computer system, or computer network.
(5) Knowingly and without permission disrupts or causes the
disruption of computer services or denies or causes the denial of
computer services to an authorized user of a computer, computer
system, or computer network.
(6) Knowingly and without permission provides or assists in
providing a means of accessing a computer, computer system, or
computer network in violation of this section.
(7) Knowingly and without permission accesses or causes to be
accessed any computer, computer system, or computer network.
(8) Knowingly introduces any computer contaminant into any
computer, computer system, or computer network.
(9) Knowingly and without permission uses the Internet domain name
of another individual, corporation, or entity in connection with the
sending of one or more electronic mail messages, and thereby damages
or causes damage to a computer, computer system, or computer
network.
(d) (1) Any person who violates any of the provisions of paragraph
(1), (2), (4), or (5) of subdivision (c) is punishable by a fine not
exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000), or by imprisonment in the
state prison for 16 months, or two or three years, or by both that
fine and imprisonment, or by a fine not exceeding five thousand
dollars ($5,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding
one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment.
(2) Any person who violates paragraph (3) of subdivision (c) is
punishable as follows:
(A) For the first violation that does not result in injury, and
where the value of the computer services used does not exceed nine
hundred fifty dollars ($950), by a fine not exceeding five thousand
dollars ($5,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding
one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment.
(B) For any violation that results in a victim expenditure in an
amount greater than five thousand dollars ($5,000) or in an injury,
or if the value of the computer services used exceeds nine hundred
fifty dollars ($950), or for any second or subsequent violation, by a
fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000), or by
imprisonment in the state prison for 16 months, or two or three
years, or by both that fine and imprisonment, or by a fine not
exceeding five thousand dollars ($5,000), or by imprisonment in a
county jail not exceeding one year, or by both that fine and
imprisonment.
(3) Any person who violates paragraph (6) or (7) of subdivision
(c) is punishable as follows:
(A) For a first violation that does not result in injury, an
infraction punishable by a fine not exceeding one thousand dollars
($1,000).
(B) For any violation that results in a victim expenditure in an
amount not greater than five thousand dollars ($5,000), or for a
second or subsequent violation, by a fine not exceeding five thousand
dollars ($5,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding
one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment.
(C) For any violation that results in a victim expenditure in an
amount greater than five thousand dollars ($5,000), by a fine not
exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000), or by imprisonment in the
state prison for 16 months, or two or three years, or by both that
fine and imprisonment, or by a fine not exceeding five thousand
dollars ($5,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding
one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment.
(4) Any person who violates paragraph (8) of subdivision (c) is
punishable as follows:
(A) For a first violation that does not result in injury, a
misdemeanor punishable by a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars
($5,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year,
or by both that fine and imprisonment.
(B) For any violation that results in injury, or for a second or
subsequent violation, by a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars
($10,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one
year, or in the state prison, or by both that fine and imprisonment.
(5) Any person who violates paragraph (9) of subdivision (c) is
punishable as follows:
(A) For a first violation that does not result in injury, an
infraction punishable by a fine not one thousand dollars.
(B) For any violation that results in injury, or for a second or
subsequent violation, by a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars
($5,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year,
or by both that fine and imprisonment.

JDay
09-01-2010, 4:24 PM
The rest of CA PC 502.

(e) (1) In addition to any other civil remedy available, the owner
or lessee of the computer, computer system, computer network,
computer program, or data who suffers damage or loss by reason of a
violation of any of the provisions of subdivision (c) may bring a
civil action against the violator for compensatory damages and
injunctive relief or other equitable relief. Compensatory damages
shall include any expenditure reasonably and necessarily incurred by
the owner or lessee to verify that a computer system, computer
network, computer program, or data was or was not altered, damaged,
or deleted by the access. For the purposes of actions authorized by
this subdivision, the conduct of an unemancipated minor shall be
imputed to the parent or legal guardian having control or custody of
the minor, pursuant to the provisions of Section 1714.1 of the Civil
Code.
(2) In any action brought pursuant to this subdivision the court
may award reasonable attorney's fees.
(3) A community college, state university, or academic institution
accredited in this state is required to include computer-related
crimes as a specific violation of college or university student
conduct policies and regulations that may subject a student to
disciplinary sanctions up to and including dismissal from the
academic institution. This paragraph shall not apply to the
University of California unless the Board of Regents adopts a
resolution to that effect.
(4) In any action brought pursuant to this subdivision for a
willful violation of the provisions of subdivision (c), where it is
proved by clear and convincing evidence that a defendant has been
guilty of oppression, fraud, or malice as defined in subdivision (c)
of Section 3294 of the Civil Code, the court may additionally award
punitive or exemplary damages.
(5) No action may be brought pursuant to this subdivision unless
it is initiated within three years of the date of the act complained
of, or the date of the discovery of the damage, whichever is later.
(f) This section shall not be construed to preclude the
applicability of any other provision of the criminal law of this
state which applies or may apply to any transaction, nor shall it
make illegal any employee labor relations activities that are within
the scope and protection of state or federal labor laws.
(g) Any computer, computer system, computer network, or any
software or data, owned by the defendant, that is used during the
commission of any public offense described in subdivision (c) or any
computer, owned by the defendant, which is used as a repository for
the storage of software or data illegally obtained in violation of
subdivision (c) shall be subject to forfeiture, as specified in
Section 502.01.
(h) (1) Subdivision (c) does not apply to punish any acts which
are committed by a person within the scope of his or her lawful
employment. For purposes of this section, a person acts within the
scope of his or her employment when he or she performs acts which are
reasonably necessary to the performance of his or her work
assignment.
(2) Paragraph (3) of subdivision (c) does not apply to penalize
any acts committed by a person acting outside of his or her lawful
employment, provided that the employee's activities do not cause an
injury, as defined in paragraph (8) of subdivision (b), to the
employer or another, or provided that the value of supplies or
computer services, as defined in paragraph (4) of subdivision (b),
which are used does not exceed an accumulated total of two hundred
fifty dollars ($250).
(i) No activity exempted from prosecution under paragraph (2) of
subdivision (h) which incidentally violates paragraph (2), (4), or
(7) of subdivision (c) shall be prosecuted under those paragraphs.
(j) For purposes of bringing a civil or a criminal action under
this section, a person who causes, by any means, the access of a
computer, computer system, or computer network in one jurisdiction
from another jurisdiction is deemed to have personally accessed the
computer, computer system, or computer network in each jurisdiction.
(k) In determining the terms and conditions applicable to a person
convicted of a violation of this section the court shall consider
the following:
(1) The court shall consider prohibitions on access to and use of
computers.
(2) Except as otherwise required by law, the court shall consider
alternate sentencing, including community service, if the defendant
shows remorse and recognition of the wrongdoing, and an inclination
not to repeat the offense.

Rekrab
09-01-2010, 4:24 PM
Try killing it in your registry or in the Boot.ini.

winnre
09-01-2010, 4:28 PM
Install a keyscrambler so they cannot see what you type.
Install a tempest video driver to hork up video making capture difficult.
Hope they work.

Nodaedul
09-01-2010, 4:38 PM
Thanks for the help guys. DJay, wow, lets not blow this out of proportion. I have full authorized access to this computer and I have not been made to read or sign any particular use policy. I will have plausabe deniability. Actually, they even sent me the install file and had me install this monitoring software myself.

bigmike82
09-01-2010, 5:18 PM
Why make things difficult on yourself? Stop watching porn and you'll be alright.

Remember that you live in an employment at-will state. If you start pissing them off, they need no grounds to fire you.

ocabj
09-01-2010, 5:38 PM
Thanks for the help guys. DJay, wow, lets not blow this out of proportion. I have full authorized access to this computer and I have not been made to read or sign any particular use policy. I will have plausabe deniability. Actually, they even sent me the install file and had me install this monitoring software myself.

You don't have to sign a particular use policy. It's the company's computer and company's network. You have to abide by their policies as an employee.

As far as actually being the one who installed the software, that sounds pretty stupid. Your IT department needs to reevaluate how they delegate rights.

pat038536
09-01-2010, 7:12 PM
Won't the company see that your messing with the monitoring software ..by viewing the software's logs?..

sfwdiy
09-01-2010, 8:10 PM
This thread is just funny.

--B

Exile Machine
09-01-2010, 8:17 PM
Install an ubuntu live CD, reformat the entire machine and install ubuntu. When questioned about it later, feign ignorance. Should keep them off your back for a few days till they figure it out anyway. Welcome to 2010 by the way. It's 1984 all over again.

-Mark

JDay
09-01-2010, 10:02 PM
Thanks for the help guys. DJay, wow, lets not blow this out of proportion. I have full authorized access to this computer and I have not been made to read or sign any particular use policy. I will have plausabe deniability. Actually, they even sent me the install file and had me install this monitoring software myself.

Their computer system, their rules. If you actually had full access to the system you would be able to simply uninstall the software, since you cannot it is obvious that you do not have full authorized access to the system. To quote you.

I have most permissions and can install and remove other progams.

That sure doesn't sound like admin rights, which you would have if you had full access.

only10x
09-03-2010, 11:19 PM
keep your job. if you hate it or dont care if they fire you, then by all means monkey with the software because they will catch on. im sure there are tons of things you can see and do online that wont get you into trouble, why not save the other stuff till you go home?

freonr22
09-03-2010, 11:20 PM
op, any update? did you uninstall? or scramble?

POLICESTATE
09-03-2010, 11:23 PM
You're stuck with it, learn to live with it. That or find a new job.

bbguns44
09-04-2010, 2:54 PM
A director at a large company I used to work for actually got up & said
if he was going to surf the web, he would use a laptop with a modem &
plug into the telephone jack for a dial up connection. That avoids the
company network monitoring. That was many years ago. Today you can
get one of those portable wi fi hot spots, $40/month, and surf all you
want using your own connection. No company interference, except for your
boss catching you goofing off.

Tacom
09-04-2010, 4:15 PM
A director at a large company I used to work for actually got up & said
if he was going to surf the web, he would use a laptop with a modem &
plug into the telephone jack for a dial up connection. That avoids the
company network monitoring. That was many years ago. Today you can
get one of those portable wi fi hot spots, $40/month, and surf all you
want using your own connection. No company interference, except for your
boss catching you goofing off.

Or just tether your smart phone

Meety Peety
09-04-2010, 4:16 PM
Not that I condone, agree with or support these actions - here's what one might do if they wanted to disable or remove a program from a computer. Restart the computer and boot into safe mode. Create a new Administrator account via the control panel and restart. Obviously, log into this new account and make any changes that you feel need to be made, making sure not to break any laws or company regulations. Restart and boot into safe mode. Remove the new Administrator account if you would like. Restart and log into your desired user account.

sevensix2x51
09-04-2010, 4:26 PM
either that, or you could

GET BACK TO WORK!!!








:D

if i were you, i wouldnt have installed it. "oh, yeah... that.. i was going to do that, but ive just been so busy with [important work project] that i havent had a minute to rest. but as soon as im done, ill get right on that!"

frankm
09-04-2010, 11:16 PM
Well if you're surfin'. Encrypt webpages on a proxy, send them to your PC using such as PPTP, unencrypt them. But if you get caught, buh-bye.

bombadillo
09-06-2010, 8:27 AM
If you're really gonna screw off, just get a net book and use a wireless connection from your phone or somewhere near you. Don't get fired for something stupid. Although, if you do I know some people who may be interested in your job... :D

Nodaedul
09-07-2010, 12:17 PM
Thanks for the replies guys. I Had no nefarious intentions, just don't like being watched. I elected not to mess with it. The software is too robust and messing with it could make it look like I am up to some serious shenanigans. I think I'll stick to my smart phone for personal Internet access at work.

TWoods450
09-07-2010, 11:55 PM
I work IT, we have software liket hat on our systems, but its for inventory purposes and remote management. We dont' actively spy on our employees. We had some folks run third party firewalls to try and disable it. some went as far as wiping their systems and reinstalling the OS, our answer reimage it with our image.Bottom line, its the companies computer NOT YOURS, if they want to install software they can because IT IS THEIR COMPUTER. If you don't like it, find a new job where they won't use remote management software, but good luck with that. If you don't like it because you want to do your personal banking on the system, remember its NOT YOUR COMPUTER.
Sorry just annoys the **** out of me when people can't understand that they are at work, you are there to work, its simple do your work and you have nothing to hide or worry about.

bigmike82
09-08-2010, 7:54 AM
"Sorry just annoys the **** out of me when people can't understand that they are at work, you are there to work, its simple do your work and you have nothing to hide or worry about."

I too work in IT, but I'm not a fan of this attitude. IT guys need to understand a few things.

1. Employees *will* do outside stuff on their computers. The only time this doesn't happen, to the best of my knowledge, is in secure gov't systems. This isn't a bad thing.

2. Point 1 isn't a bad thing. It adds to employee morale, allows them to run errands from work and free up some time to spend with their family or doing other leisurely stuff. As long as it doesn't interfere with work, it's not a problem.

3. IT is there to *SERVE* the users. I know it's a tough nut to swallow, but in very, very few industries is IT the revenue generating mechanism. I can't even think of a case where internal IT generates revenue for the company. It assists in the process and makes the company run more efficiently, but the bottom line is that IT is there to help the users.

Point is, there's a happy middle ground. What the OP wanted was stupid, from both a technology and business perspective, but the attitude that "It's my computer and you will do what I say" is very much counter-productive.

BluNorthern
09-08-2010, 8:30 AM
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=338718
This crap pisses me off. There are plenty of people looking for work in this economy that I'm sure would be willing to take your places AND not try to do a run around their employers. So much for the American worker being tops in productivity...I guess.

hoozaru
09-08-2010, 10:20 AM
dude, get an iphone, driod, blackberry or any smartphone with data plan
then watch porn or read calguns on that

locosway
09-08-2010, 8:33 PM
If you want to get fired, put Linux on a flash drive, reboot, and bask in the glory of OSS.

willm952
09-08-2010, 9:05 PM
I work at an enigneering firm as an IT worker with 40,000+ employees operating on 6 continents.
Whenever the user first signs on for the first time onto the network, they get a prompt and have to click it to continue. It basically acknowledges that it is a company pc and the company has full authority to monitor and/or remove software etc. that it deems to be in non-compliance with access standards. Completely agree with that. If you look at all the virus break outs, a common factor is that the user had admin rights on the machine. Admin rights that could be used to try to circumvent tools and such.
They don't need admin rights unless it is technically impossible to run work applications.
Hell some users had a bright idea to upgrade to ie 8 then the install got botched and they tried to roll back to ie 6 automatically then manually. Wow, all I could think of was we need to remove admin rights on all non-cad users pronto!

I agree that IT exists to facillitate business processes, we do not generate any revenue for the company. However, keeping in mind that it does boost employee morale to do non-work activity while at work, that is a limited factor. Internal security and employee productivity for work come first. Security gets compromised, then there's a severe loss of productivity and revenue. Example, internet access get hosed for a group of users, were not even talking about a site, due to a virus outbreak. Those users need to access such and such sites to download data for a propsal deadline. Well, we can have someone else get that data and submit for them but that's still a huge productivity loss and the proposal won't be in its top form.

We're not in the habit of strictly monitoring our employees browsing habits and such. No one in corporate it has the time or desire to do that. We use web filtering software that's having glitches right now. Without mentioning specific names its a web something or other, you know. Hell as expensive too. We're actually very loose in our corporate culture but everyone does understand that when we need to make configuration changes it is in the best interest of the company they work for.

locosway
09-08-2010, 9:11 PM
Last company I worked for used a web filtering appliance, and it really was a joke. I tried talking them into going open source and using a proxy to reduce cost and improve uptime, but they were a "no OSS allowed" company.

tankerman
09-08-2010, 9:22 PM
3. IT is there to *SERVE* the users. I know it's a tough nut to swallow, but in very, very few industries is IT the revenue generating mechanism. I can't even think of a case where internal IT generates revenue for the company. It assists in the process and makes the company run more efficiently, but the bottom line is that IT is there to help the users.

Thank you for bringing up this point. I'm not sure what it is about most IT guys, but this 'King of the Realm' mentality seems widespread. Several times I've had to remind egotistical IT dudes that their job is support and that they're not the reason the company exists. The IT department is not a revenue generator.

BOFH
09-08-2010, 9:42 PM
dude, get an iphone, driod, blackberry or any smartphone with data plan
then watch porn or read calguns on that

That is a far better option than going against company policy.

At our company we have a pretty open policy when it comes to surfing the internet, but we do limit access to some online content. Some people don't like it but they are free to find another job. None of our restrictions were put in place just for the hell of it...we have our reasons. Security is a top priority for us and we simply can't allow unrestricted internet access. Any attempt to circumvent our restrictions will result in job loss...and we have systems in place that will catch anyone that is stupid enough to have a go at it.

kazman
09-09-2010, 12:27 AM
Yeah don't mess with the Sureview stuff. The feds use it to monitor their employees (eg cia)so it's pretty serious stuff. There was even an article in the WSJ about 3 years ago about how Walmart was using it to monitor their employees.

freonr22
09-09-2010, 12:34 AM
so, you want to steal from your employer? ie get paid when you should be working, but surfing instead? "off with your head you thief"

E Pluribus Unum
09-09-2010, 1:07 AM
This is so easy....


boot to an Ubuntu live CD. Everything is done in RAM, so when you turn off the computer, there is literally no record of it. You can mount the hard drive to save any files you need to save. The live CD has a fully functional OS including web browsers, MS OFFice and outlook equivalents, et cetera. Unless they are packet sniffing/capturing, it's completely untraceable.

Ultimately, the only way to be completely untraceable is buy a personal laptop for $300, and data tether your cell phone to the laptop. Then you can surf the net to your hearts desire.

BOFH
09-09-2010, 9:12 AM
. Unless they are packet sniffing/capturing, it's completely untraceable.


You can pretty much count on that. Any shop that is worth its salt is watching traffic at the gateway.

locosway
09-09-2010, 9:27 AM
You can pretty much count on that. Any shop that is worth its salt is watching traffic at the gateway.

Assuming they care. This nanny stuff bothers me. If the employee is not performing, fire them. If they're meeting your expectations, or more, stop worrying about what they're doing online.

I've worked at a lot of casual places, and a few uptight ones. It seems the places that were more casual had people who were willing to get the job done, no matter what. The ones that were uptight had the opposite effect. Yeah, the people wanted to work, but often only to collect their check.

CSACANNONEER
09-09-2010, 9:30 AM
A personal $200 laptop in your cubical should allow you to continue veiwing porn without "them" knowing.

BOFH
09-09-2010, 9:58 AM
Assuming they care. This nanny stuff bothers me. If the employee is not performing, fire them. If they're meeting your expectations, or more, stop worrying about what they're doing online.

I've worked at a lot of casual places, and a few uptight ones. It seems the places that were more casual had people who were willing to get the job done, no matter what. The ones that were uptight had the opposite effect. Yeah, the people wanted to work, but often only to collect their check.

Its not a question of being a 'nanny', its a question of catching and preventing intrusions into your network and maintaining a secure environment. If you dont look for it you cant find it. We have the ability to inspect every packet that crosses our LAN but 99.999% of the time nobody cares enough to watch what an individual user is doing, but if they do something to trigger an alert from the IDS they might be monitored closely during the investigation. The only other way we would really care about their habits would be if productivity has gone below an acceptable level, at that point we might see if its due to spending 90% of the day browsing the internet.

And trust me...we almost certainly work with your sensitive data...data you would not want leaking out onto the internet. You might not want to have your browsing habits put under a microscope at your job but I am pretty damn sure you want us to make sure your personal information is kept secure. The only way we can do that is to know as much as possible about the traffic on our LAN and across our gateways.

Bottom line: Its our network, its our rules, they are in place for a reason. We pay our people well and trust them but its our responsibility to our clients to keep their data secure and we need to be able to prove none of the data has left our network. Security trumps 'but I want to play games on Facebook' :D

E Pluribus Unum
09-09-2010, 10:57 AM
You can pretty much count on that. Any shop that is worth its salt is watching traffic at the gateway.

That's when you Ultra VNC to your home computer using encryption.

BOFH
09-09-2010, 11:16 AM
That's when you Ultra VNC to your home computer using encryption.

Running alternate ports and encryption is good for flying under the radar but I would not assume you are avoiding detection by doing so. You probably are in most cases though.

tacticalcity
09-09-2010, 11:51 AM
Sounds like you want to get fired. What you want to do is also a felony.

http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=pen&group=00001-01000&file=484-502.9

Felony? No, it is not. There are plenty of ways you can not participate in being monitored without violating the law. It all depends on how they have their monitoring system setup.

Lots of companies install a monitoring program that sits on the firewall computer that is connected to the network just after the modem. It allows them to keep a record of all the websites you visit, without having to install software on each individual computer. SonicWall for example also blocks out 50% of the Internet, including all "weapons" related sites like Calguns.net. This is a default setting.

The way around this type of monitoring system is obvious. Instead of connecting to the Internet through the Internet connection provided by the company, connect through another Internet access point like the free wireless connection provided by the coffee shop around the corner or your cell phone.

You are not tampering with their computer, and you do have their permission to use that computer. There is no written policy about using an access point other than the one that is provided by the company. So no law is being broken.

Could they fire you over it? It depends. Are the websites you are visiting or anything you are doing on-line a violation of their written policy? If so then yes, if not then probably not but they might ask you to stop doing it and they might change their written policy to forbid it in the future.

It is worth noting that some of us have job descriptions where we are required to install and remove software, setup network connections, and manipulate the company computers beyond basic data entry. I am lucky enough to be one of those people. The guidelines set out for us at my day job about what we are and are not allowed to do are practically non-existent.

Where you could get into trouble is if your activities lead to damage to of the computers or company data. For example if you are circumventing their internet connection to get around the monitoring aspects of their firewall and as a result give up some of protection offered by that firewall and you get a virus, or trojan horse or some data gets stolen by a hacker - you are on the hook for that.

tacticalcity
09-09-2010, 12:16 PM
either that, or you could

GET BACK TO WORK!!!


Oh crap! My boss is on Calguns! ;)

freonr22
09-09-2010, 12:18 PM
The beatings will continue until morale improves

doubetrucker
09-23-2013, 10:58 PM
My company installed a powerful computer monitoring (http://www.myjad.com/monitor-computer-activity.html) software on our computers called Sureview. I don't like being monitored and I really want to screw with it. Any computer savvy people here have any good ideas on how to bypass/corrupt/screw with this software in any way? Im on XP professoinal and I do not have the permissions to disable the active process DLP.exe but I have most permissions and can install and remove other progams.

Yeah don't mess with the Sureview stuff. The feds use it to monitor their employees (eg cia)so it's pretty serious stuff. There was even an article in the WSJ about 3 years ago about how Walmart was using it to monitor their employees.

As far as I am concerned, computer monitoring software is invisible from the task manager, so it is possible to make some not show up. A lot of the time the knowledge that they're being monitored is enough to make them be more careful about what they do online, I suppose it would be the same with employees.

Darryl Licht
09-23-2013, 11:14 PM
My company installed a powerful computer monitoring software on our computers called Sureview. I don't like being monitored and I really want to screw with it. Any computer savvy people here have any good ideas on how to bypass/corrupt/screw with this software in any way? Im on XP professoinal and I do not have the permissions to disable the active process DLP.exe but I have most permissions and can install and remove other progams.

DO YOU LIKE YOUR JOB AND ENJOY A PAYCHECK???

DONT RISK IT!

JUST SURF PRON @ HOME!

Did you sign anything or do you have to click agree to any logon banner stating you will not install/uninstall sw? If so you could be fired!

Darryl Licht
09-23-2013, 11:15 PM
The beatings will continue until morale improves

I thought it went:

THE DRINKING WILL CONTINUE UNTIL MORALE IMPROVES!

Brianguy
09-23-2013, 11:19 PM
Did you find a solution, Snowd...err Noda?

POLICESTATE
09-23-2013, 11:24 PM
WTF is up with this necroposting on this dead horse???

http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100102165810/asdf/images/a/af/Necropost.jpg

the86d
09-24-2013, 6:47 AM
Knoppix, Knoppix, a hundred-times Knoppix, or Backtrack (Linux). ;) I used to say install Slackware if a reinstall is an option, as that runs on Everything. I am using Pear Linux on my desktop this very moment and have been for months.

If you are running Citrix, then I don't know about Live distros that have a Citrix client, but I haven't checked. SSH tunnel to an RDP session at home? ;)