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quig
08-31-2010, 2:35 PM
In an attempt to learn a new firearm, I dusted off my dad's old 92f, which he used as a duty weapon before they went to larger calibers. He hasn't cared for his firearms as he should being close to the beach. We found rust on the barrel and slide.

I decided to refinish it, as I figured that this would be a great opportunity to learn the inner workings of the firearm as I disassembled and reassembled. Durabake to the frame and blue the barrel and slide.

The problem came when I took it to the range for a function test. I am a novice when it comes to Double action for I only have experience with revolvers, 1911's, and XD's. The 92 shot accurately, but there were a few rounds in every magazine in which the hammer wouldn't stay back and would return to double action.

No jams, no FTF, FTE's. Just this one problem. I wasn't able to pinpoint when it would happen. It seemed to be random. It was somewhere in the middle of the mag, the slide always locked back after the final round was fired. I made sure my grip was good and I was not limp wristing.

Have other 92 shooters encounter this problem. This gun will probably sit in my pop's safe, so this is not a huge problem, more for my curiosity. Maybe there is an easy fix or explanation.

Overall, it was a good experience. Now I have to choose another of his safe queens to "learn".

Thanks

Pred@tor
08-31-2010, 2:41 PM
Might need a new hammer spring I replaced mine on my 92FS with a wolf springs service pack. I had bought this pistol shortly after I turned 21. Mine is a 1990 Italian made 92FS and during a CCW class my locking block broke so I replaced the block and springs. Maybe a new hammer spring would help?

https://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=0/sid=881/schematicsdetail/92_96_Stock_Combat its part 38 on there

sevensix2x51
08-31-2010, 2:59 PM
slight derail- i seem to recall hearing that marines were taught specifically to limpwrist the beretta.. faster followups or something? is this internet lore or is it for reals?

OneSevenDeuce
08-31-2010, 3:15 PM
slight derail- i seem to recall hearing that marines were taught specifically to limpwrist the beretta.. faster followups or something? is this internet lore or is it for reals?

Never heard that one. I'm going to guess that it's not true. No military instructor from any branch that I have ever had has recommended limp wristing any weapon. Follow up shots in particular would be more difficult to do rapidly and accurately since the sights would be flopping all over the place.

Bullwinkle
08-31-2010, 3:42 PM
When you were "learning" the inner workings, did you align the sear spring correctly? Just grasping at straw here... seems sort-of logical that if the sear spring isn't tensioned properly then the sear might not set into the hammer notch quickly enough... and probably a random thing. Like I said, just a WAG.

quig
08-31-2010, 3:46 PM
I did it just like this:

http://www.beretta92fs.com/video/3/sear.wmv

Is this the area in which would cause the problem? Maybe a new sear or sear spring?

huckberry668
08-31-2010, 4:11 PM
Does the hammer fall all the way back hitting the firing pin or just rest in the half cocked position?

If the top of the sear doesn't spring back to the rear ward position the hammer won't get cocked. Your situation sounds like the hammer didn't get caught by the sear. Also, there is a little 'thumb' shaped piece called "hammer release lever" that releases the hammer when you turn the safety on. It drops the hammer by activating the sear w/o deactivating the firing pin block.

I see these possibilities:
1. Sear spring is weak or installed incorrectly.
2. Since you Durabake the frame I'm guessing the coats of Durabake probably reduced the tolerances inside the frame cut for the sear &/or hammer release lever that they get stuck once in a while leaving the hammer uncocked.

I'd suggest disasemble the gun put the pin thru sear & hammer release lever w/o the springs and make sure they both move freely thru out the entire range of motion. Reassemble correctly, lube generously and try again.

Here is the schematics for your reference.
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=0/sid=882/schematicsdetail/92_96_FS___D___M___22_Practice_Kit

Pay attention to:
#40 sear
#41 sear spring position
#31 hammer release lever

quig
08-31-2010, 7:12 PM
Does the hammer fall all the way back hitting the firing pin or just rest in the half cocked position?

If the top of the sear doesn't spring back to the rear ward position the hammer won't get cocked. Your situation sounds like the hammer didn't get caught by the sear. Also, there is a little 'thumb' shaped piece called "hammer release lever" that releases the hammer when you turn the safety on. It drops the hammer by activating the sear w/o deactivating the firing pin block.

I see these possibilities:
1. Sear spring is weak or installed incorrectly.
2. Since you Durabake the frame I'm guessing the coats of Durabake probably reduced the tolerances inside the frame cut for the sear &/or hammer release lever that they get stuck once in a while leaving the hammer uncocked.

I'd suggest disasemble the gun put the pin thru sear & hammer release lever w/o the springs and make sure they both move freely thru out the entire range of motion. Reassemble correctly, lube generously and try again.

Here is the schematics for your reference.
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=0/sid=882/schematicsdetail/92_96_FS___D___M___22_Practice_Kit

Pay attention to:
#40 sear
#41 sear spring position
#31 hammer release lever

Noted, I will check into this.

Thanks for all the help.

huckberry668
09-01-2010, 9:53 AM
Can you update us on what you find? I'm curious. :)

wu_dot_com
09-01-2010, 10:44 AM
depends on the age of the gun, perhaps you might need to replace the sear spring. if the sear spring seems fine, then all you need to do is bend it a little to adjust the tension. the flatter it is, the harder the trigger pull, the more angle it is, the lighter the trigger pull. to fine tune the minimum sear spring tension, you need to pull the slide back until its right before full cock position and let the slide ride home (i.e. release the slide right before the hammer is cock). if the hammer falls completely, you need to increase the tension until the hammer is caught at half cock when the slide is close. this is because the half cock notch is much shallower than the full cock notch, so if the sear will catch onto the half cock notch, it will catch onto the full cock notch during cycling.

if you are in LA area, PM me and i will show you what to do.

9mmepiphany
09-01-2010, 11:07 AM
slight derail- i seem to recall hearing that marines were taught specifically to limpwrist the beretta.. faster followups or something? is this internet lore or is it for reals?

you might have mis-understood, not trying to hold the gun down is recoil...allowing to to rise and return does allow faster followup shots (it has to do with seeing the aligned sights on target quicker)...but this isn't the same as limpwristing.

very fast shooters gave up the hard stance/grip back in the 80s when they found it more accurate and faster not to

Mr. Beretta
09-01-2010, 2:59 PM
Did you super clean it when it came back from the shop with the new finish?

Don't be shy about lubing the rails and other contact points.

Good Luck!

quig
09-01-2010, 3:06 PM
Did you super clean it when it came back from the shop with the new finish?

Don't be shy about lubing the rails and other contact points.

Good Luck!

The shop in question was my garage, I did the refinish my self. I did lube generously.

I will take a better look into the sear spring. As I recall, when I put it back, it was fairly easy. The video warned, and showed that there may be difficulty to get the spring in with tension. This didn't seem to be the case with me.

I will take a further look, but it may be a while. I will report back.