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View Full Version : my first handgun purchase ever, need advice


9mill
08-24-2010, 10:10 AM
Hi! Im new and glad to be here, I went to a Glock event this weekend to check them out. When I placed one comfortably in my hand, I noticed two things 1, my trigger finger got snagged on the trigger gaurd when I move my finger from the safe position "on the frame" to the trigger. And 2, the joint of my finger was resting on the trigger not my distal pad. I pointed this out to the techinician and he said I was over gripping the gun and told me to rotate my hand a little. which solved both problems but left a unnatural feeling void between my hand and the grip. Is this a solvable problem in your opinion, or should I look elswhere. Also Im a lefty, and If anyone has any comments about Cylinder & Slides' left hand mag release lever I would appreciate that to. thanks Calgunners!

maddoggie13
08-24-2010, 10:14 AM
If you are a lefty, try a xd setup for left hand shooters. Try few guns before buying one.

cmichini
08-24-2010, 10:18 AM
First off, welcome to calguns!! I'm not an expert (they'll be here shortly I'm sure), but am a long time shooter so I've been around them.

In my (humble) opinion, I would want to have the pistol fit my hand vs. making my hand fit the pistol. It will give you a more natural feeling grip, which should equate to less strain on your hand muscles, which should make your shooting better (overall).

I think some of the newer models have a removable backstrap on their grips so you may be able to modify it to fit your hand more naturally.

The barrel should naturally point forward with the grip snugly centered into the web between your thumb and index finger. When you look at it from above it should look like the pistol is literally an extension of your hand/arm.

Possibly try a couple of other Glock models, but I suggest you also fondle some other brands. You never know what is going to just feel 'right'.

As to lefty gear, I wouldn't know. Again, you'll surely hear from others who have probably used lots of lefty gear.

Good luck and stay safe!!

Recession
08-24-2010, 10:23 AM
+1 on the XD.

Kyle1886
08-24-2010, 10:38 AM
9mill, I have a Glock and understand the "void" to speak of, though I have no problem with it. I recently shot a Beretta 92 (I think that's what it was) and the grip seems a be somewhat "wider" and fill that gap. Might give that a look-see.

Welcome, and good luck

Kyle

tacticalcity
08-24-2010, 10:38 AM
The thing is, there is a right way and a wrong way to do things. The way that feels natural, is usually the wrong way. Once you have taken a few defensive handgun courses, and put a few hundred hours of range time into doing it the right way...suddenly the right way feels natural. Until then your body is going to do everything it can to screw you up and make you shoot like a NOOB.

It is all about putting the bullet(s) where it/they need(s) to go as accurately and quickly as possible so that you survive the encounter and live to fight another day. It is not about being comfortable.

Think about it based on experience you already have. Somebody starts a fist fight with you. Are you going to just stand there with your shoulders slumped and wait for him to come at you, or are you going to square off, tighten your core unnaturally tight and tuck in and raise your arms to fend off his blows. That stance that now seems like a natural response was learned on the school yard playground over the years or by watching Bruce Lee movies. You were not born with it. You learned it. The more professional training you have, the better at it you are likely to be. The right way to do it, is anything but comfortable.

The same goes with shooting technique. It isn't lounging around and drinking a beer with your buddies. It is a fight. The right way to do it is going to feel very stiff and extremely awkward until you have practiced it long enough for it to become second nature.

You can either embrace the right way of doing it, and become the Bruce Lee of shooting or you can do what comes comfortably and be the chump who looses. In a gun fight, loosing can mean dying.

Regardless, how the gun looks and even how the gun feels in your hand is irrelevant compared to how the gun functions. The Glock has the same trigger pull every single time and it has a short reset so that means you will be able to master the trigger pull very easily and get very fast and accurate follow up shots. The only gun that can match the Glock in this area is the 1911, except the 1911 has a safety you have to contend with that the Glock doesn't have. This is what makes the Glock arguably the finest self-defense handgun in the world.

ALL THAT SAID. IF WHEN HOLDING THE GUN PROPERLY IT STILL JUST DOES NOT FEEL RIGHT, IT IS TIME TO FIND ONE THAT DOES. BUT ONLY IF YOU ARE HOLDING IT PROPERLY. TRYING TO FIND A GUN THAT FEELS RIGHT WHEN DOING THINGS BASS AKWARDS IS ONLY GOING TO ENCOURAGE YOU TO DO THINGS WRONG. IT IS A GOOD THING THAT WHEN DO THINGS WRONG IT FEELS WRONG. THAT IS A CLUE YOU NEED TO MAKE AN ADJUSTMENT AND DO IT RIGHT. THERE IS SO MUCH TO THINK ABOUT WHEN FIRST LEARNING TO MASTER A HANDGUN, THAT YOU CAN USE ALL THE HINTS YOU CAN GET.

- 1 on the XD. The trigger rest is much longer than on the Glock. Making the trigger much more difficult to master. This means slower less accurate follow up shots compared to what the same shooter would be able to accomplish on the Glock. Additionally, it has some height over bore issues because the sights are located very high up on the weapon. Basically this means the bullet does not go where you think it will go, especially at CQB distances. You have to practice compensating for it. However, without proper training you will never figure out why it happening or how to correct it.

Honestly, if you cannot get used to the Glock become a 1911 guy. While being something of opposites, they are the two absolute best self defense guns on the market because their actions are designed for maximum speed and accuracy under stress. A gun fight will be plenty stressful. The 1911 usually has a lighter trigger pull over all and a very short reset. You carry it cocked and locked (hammer back and safety on). So you will need to get used to working the safety, but once you have that mastered it will be an extremely smooth/fast gun for you. The advantage for you is that the fit and feel is radically different than the Glock. So if you cannot get the Glock to feel good, odds are the 1911 will. Downside is they tend to be more expensive.

Big Jake
08-24-2010, 12:18 PM
The most important thing to know about any handgun is the it needs to feel comfortable to you when you hold it. You were correct to notice this on th eGlock you held. XD is a good choice if you are comfortable with it. Welcome to the forum!

Vlad 11
08-25-2010, 10:44 AM
Welcome to CalGuns! My left-handed buddy bought a Smith & Wesson’s 9mm M&P Semi-Auto Pistol. It has slide release that can be switched to rightside or leftside and some interchangeable grip backstraps. Another option to be aware of.

om221
08-25-2010, 4:08 PM
I think you well be more happy with a Heckler and Koch or a Sig Sauer.

9mill
08-27-2010, 5:02 AM
interesting thanks guys

ZX-10R
08-27-2010, 5:34 AM
Welcome to CalGuns! My left-handed buddy bought a Smith & Wesson’s 9mm M&P Semi-Auto Pistol. It has slide release that can be switched to rightside or leftside and some interchangeable grip backstraps. Another option to be aware of.

This is the winner. Glock, XD felt alright in my hands. Ruger and S&W were the best. Need to go to range and try a few out before pulling the trigger quite literally.

turbogg
08-27-2010, 9:59 PM
Need to go to range and try a few out before pulling the trigger quite literally.

^^ good advice. Go to a local range that rents handguns, and try various sizes and types, until you find one that you are comfortable with. Oh yeah, Welcome to Calguns!