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View Full Version : Goldenrods a must?


Nismo
05-06-2006, 6:25 PM
I live in the central valley and plan on buying a 14 gun safe like the sentry from home depot or similar. Do you all think it is a must to use a goldenrod or you think I can do without one?

glen avon
05-06-2006, 6:32 PM
NO they just heat the safe up a bit. I had one and quit using it. get one of those water trap things.

Nismo
05-06-2006, 6:33 PM
So I will be ok with a few units of dessicant or however its spelled.

jdberger
05-06-2006, 9:33 PM
Dessicant works pretty well.

Get one of the giant cans from Midway or Brownells. They work pretty well. You can also recharge them in the oven.

halifax
05-07-2006, 6:17 PM
NO they just heat the safe up a bit. I had one and quit using it. get one of those water trap things.

If I'm already using one, is there some reason to stop?

glen avon
05-07-2006, 7:06 PM
only if you also keep papers and photos in the safe. warmth is death to paper and the like.

maxicon
05-07-2006, 9:04 PM
Here's my take on it:

Goldenrods are plug-and-forget. They keep on ticking.

Dessicant, water traps, whatever - all take maintenance. If you're good at maintenance, no problem, but I want my stuff to be protected, even when I haven't paid attention to it.

My safe's pretty big, and it really doesn't get hot or anything. The goldenrod itself is very warm, but the stuff in the safe doesn't feel appreciably warmer than the outside world, and is cooler in the summer when the room it's in is hot.

YMMV, as always.

max

James R.
05-09-2006, 4:05 AM
Well one thing that you can say with confidence, a dessicant ain't ever gonna start a fire. Those goldenrods on the other hand, I dunno...it's a resistor, if the contact resistance were to go up, say where the wires meet the body of the resistive element you'll get a very hot spot there which can be sufficient to cause ignition depending on the combustion temp of the material in question and the severity of the spot heating.

I use the DryOut stuff, you basically leave it in the corner and as needed pour the water off, it works great.

Regards,

James R.

TonyM
05-09-2006, 9:45 AM
My safe, like all safes has shrunk in size. I noticed this after I owned it about 2 months. It doesn't hold nearly as much as it used to, or my collection has grown..... nah, the safe got smaller (at least that's what I'd tell my wife, I certainly haven't collect any more guns... ;) ).

I like the goldenrods. They raise the temp in the safe 3-4 degrees above room temp, not nearly enough to damage paper, just don't lay any papers on the rod itself. mine is at the back and rear of my safe, and I don't ever have to worry about knocking over a can of water that was EZ-Dri, Dry-Out, or other Dessicants.

maxicon
05-09-2006, 1:02 PM
I don't ever have to worry about knocking over a can of water that was EZ-Dri, Dry-Out, or other Dessicants.

I can't find any info on the ones that collect water - are they electric, like room dehumidifiers? If so, I'd also worry about having water inside the safe if the power went out for any extended period. That would result in the internal humidity going up, particularly in hot weather.

I can only find Goldenrods, silica, and chemical vapor protection at Midway and Brownells. Maybe I'm not searching on the right terms.

max

TonyM
05-09-2006, 1:28 PM
I use Dri-Eze (Pretty sure that's it) in a 20 cubic foot chest freezer I converted to a Keg cooler. When using the temp controller and if you open the lid, you get condensation. The ones I use are a pellet like form, you put them in a tray that has slots, and a bowl under the tray. As it attracts and pulls the moisture out of the air, the bowl fills with that moisture. I wouldn't want to accidentally knock that over in my safe, if not noticed mildew/mold could grown in there... not to mention any possible damage to the "fire insulation" (Drywall) behind/below the carpet.

maxicon
05-10-2006, 3:09 PM
OK, I found some info on Dri-Eze - it appears to be some sort of hygroscopic chemical. Looks like it attracts the water, which condenses out and into the collector basin.

Do the chemicals get used up and need to be replaced? If so, the collected water would have some amount of the chemical mixed in.

I'm curious about what it is that they use. I've never seen this type of system before.

wuhungsix
05-16-2006, 2:43 AM
I use the Dri-Eze stuff... I just remember the package said it was corrosive and to avoid spilling the liquid on blued firearms...I'm nervous everytime I take it out to dump.

vonsmith
05-16-2006, 7:54 AM
Where do you buy Dri-Eze? I couldn't find a source on the web (very odd). :confused:


=vonsmith=

30LPI
05-16-2006, 8:11 AM
I live in SoCal and typically, its hot and dry most of the year. I don't think hummidity is an issue in this kind of climate. Am I wrong? I planned on using nothing more than Dessicant.

I can see using Goldenrods or other devices if you live near the coast but isn't it a bit of over kill for most people?

TonyM
05-16-2006, 8:42 AM
Where do you buy Dri-Eze? I couldn't find a source on the web (very odd). :confused:
=vonsmith=

For my keg fridge I got it at OSH.


I can see using Goldenrods or other devices if you live near the coast but isn't it a bit of over kill for most people?


Well, it's $20-30 for the rod, and between $1 and $2 a year in electricity to run it. To me, that's better than having to remember to recycle the dessicant, or drain the bowl, or accidentally spilling the collection bowl.

Overkill? maybe, but no real upkeep, and cheap to boot.

Black_Talon
05-16-2006, 5:46 PM
I live in SoCal and typically, its hot and dry most of the year. I don't think hummidity is an issue in this kind of climate. Am I wrong?

I'd say you are. :)

I live in the SGV and it generally doesn't get too humid here either. I keep a RatShack remote humidity meter in my (AmSec Fire/Burg) safe to keep on top of when my desiccant needs to be dried out. Without any desiccant in the safe, the humidity will run around 60-80%, depending on the ambient.

I planned on using nothing more than Desiccant.

Desiccant alone works great for me. With the desiccant in the safe the humidity stays around 30-40%. Most sources I can find say to keep it under 50%. Once the humidity inside the safe gets up around 45-50% I (following the directions on the desiccant pack) throw the desiccant in the oven to recharge it.

wuhungsix
05-16-2006, 10:47 PM
Where do you buy Dri-Eze? I couldn't find a source on the web (very odd). :confused:


=vonsmith=

Wild Sports in Rancho Cordova

don't know where it can be purchased online

50ae
05-17-2006, 4:45 AM
How about those big cans of Damp Rid that you use in boats. I picked up two of them recently because they were almost free on the off chance I could use them inthe safe.

Liberty Rules
06-06-2006, 4:18 PM
I am about to drill a hole in my safe to start using a Moisture King dehumidifier "rod" (there's actually no rod, it's like the innards of a Goldenrod in a flat, flexible sheath).

Thus far I have only used silica dessicants. My safe is approx. 72x29x26 and the dessicants' warning strips start go mid-pink within about a month. I increased the number of dessicants and it helped a little but I have to refresh them in the oven about every 1.5 months, assuming that I don't open the safe that much. I've got 4 large dessicants in there right now. The problem is that dessicants will eventually draw moisture to themselves from the outside air (safes are not completely air tight) and you will have to refresh them in the oven (or replace them if they are the chemical variety).

Now, I don't live in the desert like some of you. I live in the middle of a marina so I get some moisture and salty air around here. Early on, I had rust start to form on a couple items in my safe when I only had one dessicant and did not recharge it every month. Even the hardware on my stereo rack in the living room is rusting.

Once I install the "rod", I will be curious to see if the dessicants last longer.