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View Full Version : An argument for not meticulously cleaning your HD Pistol


Tanner68
08-17-2010, 9:43 AM
The other thread on gun cleaning frequency made me want to post this.

I can make a strong argument for not cleaning a HD pistol religiously after every range session. Say you just cleaned it, went to the range and put a few dozen or couple hundred rounds through it and it worked flawlessly. Then you get home and detail clean, or even just field strip and clean.... well that could be a more likely to cause of a malfunction than the modest amount of fouling that just went into it. You knew it was running fine when you left the range. Now that you got home and tore the thing down, can you be just as sure?

I think it is another good argument for not being too obsessive about gun cleaning.

sideshowhr
08-17-2010, 9:50 AM
similar concept to cleaning a hunting rifle after zeroing/trying new loads at the range.

you don't want to clean the rifle because it'd be like taking one step forward, and two steps back. thus increasing the likelihood of your gun not performing as it did at the range.

bigmike82
08-17-2010, 9:56 AM
I think it's a better statement on making sure you know your HD gun inside and out.

Think of the military. Rifles are cleaned religiously, even while in a combat area. If you know every piece of you weapon, from the springs to the firing pin to the trigger, and practice disassembly/reassembly on a constant basis, you'll be fine.

Rhythm of Life
08-17-2010, 9:58 AM
I think it's a better statement on making sure you know your HD gun inside and out.

Think of the military. Rifles are cleaned religiously, even while in a combat area. If you know every piece of you weapon, from the springs to the firing pin to the trigger, and practice disassembly/reassembly on a constant basis, you'll be fine.

I agree

Barabas
08-17-2010, 10:28 AM
Fouling shots were standard practice for BP marksmen. I hope that tolerances have tightened up enough as manufacturing standards have increased since the days of hand-fitting every part that fouling shots aren't necessary anymore.

I'd love to see a test-bed experiment showing that there is more to it than psychology today. It would reinforce my decision to not be anal about cleaning my non-corrosive/smokeless guns.

M1A Rifleman
08-17-2010, 4:33 PM
Not cleaning is a good way to allow a path for corrosion. The oils from your hands will leave rust prints. The fouling from modern ammo can also attract moisture leading to rust. The fouling does not react the same as corrosive priming did, but in humid environments even modern priming acts as a pathway for rust.

bsg
08-17-2010, 7:08 PM
i guess for me... old habits die hard, or never die. i always clean after using.... :)

shooting4life
08-17-2010, 7:52 PM
Cleanig is done way too much. Clean when it is needed, not because you put 50 rounds down range.

tankerman
08-17-2010, 9:26 PM
Fouling shots are standard for marksmen period. I don't know any hunters or serious target shooters that don't put at least a couple down the barrel before taking a 'money shot'.
Fouling shots were standard practice for BP marksmen. I hope that tolerances have tightened up enough as manufacturing standards have increased since the days of hand-fitting every part that fouling shots aren't necessary anymore.

I'd love to see a test-bed experiment showing that there is more to it than psychology today. It would reinforce my decision to not be anal about cleaning my non-corrosive/smokeless guns.

misterjake
08-17-2010, 10:26 PM
I clean my guns to near brand new appearance. Why? So when I pass it on to my kids and they pass them on to theirs they won't look like mangled pieces of rust. When you buy an old rifle, don't you appreciate it more if it was taken better care of?