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Satex
04-29-2006, 9:37 AM
Together with my Stag upper I received a 5.56 rifle manual (DoD version). I am not sure if the manual came from Stag or TPF. One thing that caught me by surprise is that the manual claims that the front sight post contains a small vial of radioactive Tritium H 3.
This is the first I have heard about this. Does anyone know why it is so? Do the civilian uppers we purchase have it too, or only the military versions?

PIRATE14
04-29-2006, 10:26 AM
Together with my Stag upper I received a 5.56 rifle manual (DoD version). I am not sure if the manual came from Stag or TPF. One thing that caught me by surprise is that the manual claims that the front sight post contains a small vial of radioactive Tritium H 3.
This is the first I have heard about this. Does anyone know why it is so? Do the civilian uppers we purchase have it too, or only the military versions?

STAG rifles and uppers come with the DoD manual version, they don't come from the factory w/ Trit night sights but you can always get them if you like.

:D

ohsmily
04-29-2006, 10:36 AM
Together with my Stag upper I received a 5.56 rifle manual (DoD version). I am not sure if the manual came from Stag or TPF. One thing that caught me by surprise is that the manual claims that the front sight post contains a small vial of radioactive Tritium H 3.
This is the first I have heard about this. Does anyone know why it is so? Do the civilian uppers we purchase have it too, or only the military versions?

All true night sights have tritium gas inside them. How do you think they glow non-stop? These are most commonly found in handgun sights, but can be found in many rifle sights as well, including many aftermarket AR sights and on the M1A SOCOM.

kenc9
04-29-2006, 8:15 PM
Interestingly enough Tritium gun sights contain tiny glass vials of a radioactive gas from recycled hydrogen bombs (or the nonexistent Israeli atomic bomb factory).

The inside of the vial is lined with a phosphor, and it glows when excited by particles from the radioactive gas.

The radioactive gas, called Tritium, has a "half life" of 14 years, meaning each 14 years half of it turns into Helium. This happens slowly, so the sights get dimmer each and every day after they were made, on a gun or not. After 14 years they will only put out half the light ... and you'll find them hard to use a lot sooner than that as they dim.

Different makers give different warranted lives -- but they all use Tritium and it decays at the same rate. They guarantee they will be "usable", but that may be in the eye of the beholder. I doubt you'll be happy with any of them after 5-7 years.

-ken

xenophobe
04-29-2006, 9:42 PM
Tritium sights generally have a 10-15 year service life. It depends on how much tritium gas is encapsulated, I imagine. Meprolights are generally known to dim faster than Trijicon, at least in rumor. I haven't tested them, and don't plan to. lol

EBWhite
04-29-2006, 11:39 PM
So stag is a supplier for the military?

Gregas
04-30-2006, 8:38 AM
Tritium sights generally have a 10-15 year service life. It depends on how much tritium gas is encapsulated, I imagine.

Actually, if the tube does not leak, it depends largely on the half-life of tritium, which is about 12 years. After 12 years, half the tritium in the tube (regardless of size) has turned into Helium-3.

paradox
04-30-2006, 8:47 AM
Yes Virginia, there are radioactive items everywhere.

Here is a good read on the Radioactive Boy Scout, which has recently been made into a book: http://www.wesjones.com/silverstein1.htm. A true story on how a high school boy scout built a breeder reactor in his grandparents shed. One of his sources of radioactive materials was illuminated rifle scopes.

NoTime2Shoot
04-30-2006, 1:55 PM
Yes Virginia, there are radioactive items everywhere.

Here is a good read on the Radioactive Boy Scout, which has recently been made into a book: http://www.wesjones.com/silverstein1.htm. A true story on how a high school boy scout built a breeder reactor in his grandparents shed. One of his sources of radioactive materials was illuminated rifle scopes.


Thanks for the read!