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TripleT
08-05-2010, 1:12 PM
Curious if any of you are storing firearms for temporarily (or otherwise) prohibited people ? I have a customer who's son just got slapped with a restraining order and the court has told him he needs to relinquish his firearms to either the S.O. or a licensed firearms dealer. Our S.O. charges for this service and I would assume that if any of you provide this service, you would also.

What are your fee's and what are the procedures (other than logging into the A&D) ? I would assume I need to provide a letter of some sort for the court.

If and when he becomes un-prohibited (is that a word ?) what would be the procedure for him to get his firearms back ? DROS ? Letter from court ? Personal Firearms Eligibility check ?

halifax
08-05-2010, 1:23 PM
I believe they can ONLY be surrendered to a LE agency or sold to a dealer. A dealer cannot just store them.

Read this. (http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/infobuls/2007-BOF-05.pdf)

rromeo
08-05-2010, 1:34 PM
Your customer could just take the firearms from his son, no?

TripleT
08-05-2010, 1:50 PM
I believe they can ONLY be surrendered to a LE agency or sold to a dealer. A dealer cannot just store them.

Read this. (http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/infobuls/2007-BOF-05.pdf)

Jim,

It looks like you are correct. Thanks for the info. I had talked to our Sheriff at one time about this and they charge about 150.00 for the first gun and 50.00 a year, if I remember correctly. The sheriff thought any dealer could provide the same service but according to the info you linked, the only thing a dealer could do is buy the firearms.

I think a simple intra-familial transfer is the way to go. I will give them the form, tell the father to pay the 19.00 to the DOJ and give his son a copy of the completed form for the court. (The transfer would involve handguns)

halifax
08-05-2010, 3:49 PM
Our Sheriff asked the local FFLs to a meeting where he was under the same impression that we could store them. When the actual wording was brought to his attention, he was not pleased. His department has neither the time or storage to deal with this. Funny how that simple solution was left out of the law. :rolleyes:

ETA: I suppose you could buy them, provide a sales receipt for the court, then wait until the dust clears and sell them back or after a specified time sell them to someone else.

ke6guj
08-05-2010, 4:31 PM
ETA: I suppose you could buy them, provide a sales receipt for the court, then wait until the dust clears and sell them back or after a specified time sell them to someone else.which is fine and dandy, unless the firearms in question are unrostered handguns or RAWs.

halifax
08-05-2010, 8:03 PM
which is fine and dandy, unless the firearms in question are unrostered handguns or RAWs.

So, the accused is left only one alternative and the one that starts with no compensation and ends in destruction if the property can not be reclaimed. Sucks.

TripleT
08-06-2010, 5:18 AM
So, the accused is left only one alternative and the one that starts with no compensation and ends in destruction if the property can not be reclaimed. Sucks.

Update: One of our deputy sheriffs has informed me that they are currently storing over 200 firearms and just a small percentage are ever returned. They are obligated to destroy the weapons. They hate it as much as we do but they don't have a viable option to return the firearms to the market. They do use some of them in drills etc.

halifax
08-06-2010, 5:32 AM
Update: One of our deputy sheriffs has informed me that they are currently storing over 200 firearms and just a small percentage are ever returned. They are obligated to destroy the weapons. They hate is as much as we do but they don't have a viable option to return the firearms to the market. They do use some of them in drills etc.

I wouldn't doubt that was the legislative intent of the law by limiting the options for the accused.

Our sheriff has a big problem with this also.

I wonder how that "Power of Attorney (http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/infobuls/2007-BOF-05.pdf)" option would work with RAWs and Large Capacity magazines.

TripleT
08-08-2010, 5:10 AM
Saw our Sheriff downtown and asked him about the DOJ memo, Power of Attorney, etc. There is definitely a mis-conception here. He would really like to see gun shops storing the firearms, just so they don't end up destroyed. The whole program is a big waist of time and resources in his view.

kemasa
08-08-2010, 1:05 PM
I don't do consignments, but could you take a firearm in on consignment and not have enough room to display it for a couple of years? I know there are some forms to fill out. I am not sure if that would be an issue. If you have the required permits, you could buy the firearm and store it and then transfer it back later.

Cokebottle
08-08-2010, 1:35 PM
So, the accused is left only one alternative and the one that starts with no compensation and ends in destruction if the property can not be reclaimed. Sucks.
Or a third option.

Being smart enough to see the writing on the wall and execute PPTs to a trusted friend BEFORE he becomes legally prohibited.

It's $35/gun, but there's no roster issues... the only guns that would be lost forever would be RAW, and even those could be sold to someone outside of California (just not repurchased by the original owner).