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chester2005
07-26-2010, 3:10 PM
Hi this is my first post and i would like some advice if possible please.

I am from the UK where all handguns are illegal!!!!!!!!

I will be over in Long Beach in September and i was wondering if it is possible and legal to get some small arms handling training and practice whilst over there.
is it legal
is it a complicated procedure
are there many ranges that would teach me and let me practice

all answers would be much appreciated

frankm
07-26-2010, 3:27 PM
Easy! A lot of ranges have classes, gun rentals, etc. If some of the local guys don't answer, when you get here, just call all the ranges in the phone book.

If ya got time, in Las Vegas there are ranges where you can shoot full-auto machineguns.

Rekrab
07-26-2010, 3:30 PM
It is very legal. I've taken a number of non-US citizens shooting for fun.

You would want to speak directly with gun ranges to ask about training programs. The individual ranges might have their own policies. One thing I can foresee is needing to bring another adult along with you for insurance reasons.

Have fun!

frankm
07-26-2010, 4:44 PM
Chainsaw, I think with an instructor, anyone can shoot.

POLICESTATE
07-26-2010, 4:49 PM
I thought rentals were okay so long as you met age requirements and you weren't a felon, mental case etc...?

Whenever I've gone to rent I don't have to prove citizenship, or even that I'm not a felon or a nut!

I don't know how it all works out, but in any case, if you go shooting with someone you should be fine, otherwise if you took your 8 year old kid out shooting you'd be in violation of the law right?

Sounds really stupid to me.

Oh and welcome to America, bring MONEY$$

Wrong. In order for a person to have possession of a gun, they need to either be a US citizen (let's skip over the various prohibited categories like felons), or be a permanent resident (colloquially known as "green card"), or they have to have a valid hunting license from a state in the US. And the moment you rent or borrow a gun, you have possession of it.

This is federal law. Look it up in some ATF rule book, or contact the ATF. Since it is federal law, it also applies in Las Vegas.

Now, some shooting ranges are ignorant of this rule, and are willing to rent guns to non-residents without hunting licenses. That's a serious crime in the making.

I don't know how difficult it is to obtain a hunting license for a non-resident (tourist). The class typically takes a weekend, but I don't know whether non-residents are even allowed to take it. The only person I know who is a non-resident with a US hunting license got his hunting license by bringing a hunting license from his country of origin to California, and since his country has much more stringent rules for hunting licenses, he was issued a license without having to take the class.

If you want to do gun training while traveling: Israel has some very good programs that cater to foreigners. I have no personal experience with that, but a German friend of mine did a few training classes there.

frankm
07-26-2010, 4:54 PM
Chester, I think if you google gun ranges near Long Beach, you can make some calls.

Rekrab
07-26-2010, 4:55 PM
Wrong. In order for a person to have possession of a gun, they need to either be a US citizen (let's skip over the various prohibited categories like felons), or be a permanent resident (colloquially known as "green card"), or they have to have a valid hunting license from a state in the US. And the moment you rent or borrow a gun, you have possession of it.

I'm not aware of any such law. Could you please show it to me? I'd like to know as I regularly take foreigners shooting to show them a good time in America.

Mssr. Eleganté
07-26-2010, 9:03 PM
And here is the plain English version on ATF's FAQ page...

http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/nonimmigrant-aliens.html#rental-qualifications

Q: I’m a nonimmigrant alien who is coming to the United States for two weeks to go hunting. Can I rent a firearm in the United States to use on this trip? What if I want to go to a shooting range one day — can I rent a firearm there as well?

As long as you possess a valid hunting license from a State within the United States, you may rent firearms to hunt and to use at a shooting range. If you do not have the hunting license, your possession of the firearms and ammunition will be unlawful. The hunting license does not have to be from the State where you will be possessing the guns and ammunition.

I believe there are some States that allow visitors to get temporary hunting licenses online without taking a hunting class. Maybe some of the hunters here on the forum can chime in on that. If you did that then you could rent firearms while visiting any State.

Mssr. Eleganté
07-26-2010, 9:43 PM
It looks like you can get an Alaska hunting license online without taking a class, but it costs $300 for non-resident aliens. :( You'd have to do a lot of shooting to make it worthwhile.

-- EDIT --

Texas has a "Non-Resident Five-Day Special Hunting" license for $48 that you can buy online. :) You would have to time it right because you would only be able to go shooting during that 5 day period.

Rekrab
07-26-2010, 10:04 PM
So, the only thing I'm seeing this applying to is rental. If a non-us citizen were to go to the range while accompanied by a legal owner of a firearm the owner would be able to lend the gun to the non-resident because legally the gun has not been rented or left the legal possession of the owner, similar to how I can lend someone a 10+ round magazine while I am at the same range. Am I wrong? I read through Chapter 44 922 but didn't see anything that applied to this specific situation.

Mssr. Eleganté
07-26-2010, 10:33 PM
As chainsaw pointed out, foreign tourists without a valid State hunting license are in the same category as convicted felons under Federal law. They are prohibited from "possessing" firearms or ammunition. This change came about within the past few years. My copy of the law from 2000 only mentions that illegal aliens are prohibited. But they changed it after 9/11 to prohibit non-immigrant aliens as well, unless they have a hunting license or other exemption.

Rekrab
07-26-2010, 10:47 PM
Very interesting, so what type of visa-holders could possess a firearm?

rimfire78
07-26-2010, 10:54 PM
Wrong. In order for a person to have possession of a gun, they need to either be a US citizen (let's skip over the various prohibited categories like felons), or be a permanent resident (colloquially known as "green card"), or they have to have a valid hunting license from a state in the US. And the moment you rent or borrow a gun, you have possession of it.

This is federal law. Look it up in some ATF rule book, or contact the ATF. Since it is federal law, it also applies in Las Vegas.

Now, some shooting ranges are ignorant of this rule, and are willing to rent guns to non-residents without hunting licenses. That's a serious crime in the making.

I don't know how difficult it is to obtain a hunting license for a non-resident (tourist). The class typically takes a weekend, but I don't know whether non-residents are even allowed to take it. The only person I know who is a non-resident with a US hunting license got his hunting license by bringing a hunting license from his country of origin to California, and since his country has much more stringent rules for hunting licenses, he was issued a license without having to take the class.

If you want to do gun training while traveling: Israel has some very good programs that cater to foreigners. I have no personal experience with that, but a German friend of mine did a few training classes there.

This past winter I was at one of the ranges frankm was talking about in Vegas where you can shoot full autos. A bunch of Austrailians were on their way out while we were heading in. They asked if I'd take a few pictures of them in front of the store, and went on and on about what a great time they'd had and which guns they'd been shooting. So apparently it was ok for these guys to rent/shoot - and they told us they were tourists on their way home that day.

HCz
07-26-2010, 11:17 PM
chainsaw is correct. However, at the same time, that law doesn't seem to be enforced. You see plenty of foreigners renting guns at the range.

dyst0pia
07-26-2010, 11:19 PM
IANAL, and I don't mean to spread FUD, but I was researching this exact question for one of my friends a while back. I came across these articles:

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/localnews/stories/052507dntexterrorcharges.271768e.html
http://www.wtsp.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=84784

Granted, there were extenuating circumstances (i.e., alleged, or maybe proven, links to terrorism. I didn't research long enough to figure that part out). But you'll notice that the charges they were convicted on weren't related to that; they were "possession of a firearm". I didn't find the original article for that second one, but if I remember, one of the pieces of evidence used was a photo of him with a rented gun at a shooting range.

Whether or not anybody it deems it appropriate to prosecute you for it, these convictions were enough to convince me that it's technically against the letter of the law, and probably not a particularly good idea. I was specifically interested in the student visa, since that's what my friend is on, but I imagine the rules would be the same for a tourist visa.

And again, not a lawyer, so take all this with a grain of salt. Personally, I wouldn't risk it, but I'm a pretty risk-averse kind of guy. How hard is it to get a hunting license in the UK? More importantly, could you then transfer that hunting license to California without taking the training course?

frankm
07-27-2010, 8:06 AM
This past winter I was at one of the ranges frankm was talking about in Vegas where you can shoot full autos. A bunch of Austrailians were on their way out while we were heading in. They asked if I'd take a few pictures of them in front of the store, and went on and on about what a great time they'd had and which guns they'd been shooting. So apparently it was ok for these guys to rent/shoot - and they told us they were tourists on their way home that day.

Lot's of Japanese do this too. Where's Gene! Maybe if an instructor is present it's not "possession" or "lending" or "rental"?

gose
07-27-2010, 8:36 AM
So, the only thing I'm seeing this applying to is rental. If a non-us citizen were to go to the range while accompanied by a legal owner of a firearm the owner would be able to lend the gun to the non-resident because legally the gun has not been rented or left the legal possession of the owner, similar to how I can lend someone a 10+ round magazine while I am at the same range. Am I wrong? I read through Chapter 44 922 but didn't see anything that applied to this specific situation.

Magazines are slightly different, since possession is explicitly legal.

Possession is (like Chainsaw states above) "A person who knowingly has direct physical control over a thing at a given time". For firearms, if someone rents a firearms and walks onto a lane all by himself, he definitely has possession of the gun, which in the case of a non-exempt foreigner, would be a felony.

Though, I would probably argue that if the owner/instructor is close (ie within arms reach), he/she can still be considered to be in control of it, meaning that the possession hasn't really transferred.


So apparently it was ok for these guys to rent/shoot

Just because they did it doesnt mean it's legal ;)

Maestro Pistolero
07-27-2010, 9:47 AM
How is it that scores of European and Asian tourists come to Las Vegas and rent weapons and full auto machine guns at ranges here everyday?

winnre
07-27-2010, 9:48 AM
So how hard is it to go to Big 5 and get a hunting license before going to the range?

Glock22Fan
07-27-2010, 9:59 AM
Well,

I certainly purchased a firearm successfully before I got my Green Card approved. At that time I had applied for a Green Card and I did have a Work Permit. They accepted the Work Permit for the purchase. This was more than a dozen years ago - pre 9/11 in other words.

CSACANNONEER
07-27-2010, 10:05 AM
WOW! I have shot with foreigners who have temporarily imported their guns into the states. I have even shot a Nemesis50 which was temporarliy imported from the UK by The Gun Room! Not "The Gun Room" in California but one in the UK. Now, why would customs allow this if they don't have a valid hunting license? Also, unless I missed something, many manufactures and attendies at SHOT would be breaking Federal law just by bringing samples to the show or handling samples while they are there.

Chester2005,

As long as we can figure out how to do it, I'd be more than happy to go shooting with you. I'm only about an hour from Long Beach so, shoot me a PM and we can talk. BTW, Do you know anyone from "The Gun Room"?

CSACANNONEER
07-27-2010, 10:07 AM
So how hard is it to go to Big 5 and get a hunting license before going to the range?

How about IMPOSSIBLE! You need to either take a hunter's safety course first or be exempt from it. The courses are not given often enough anymore.

IrishPirate
07-27-2010, 10:12 AM
I think it's one of those laws like "you can't drive without shoes", "you can't push a Moose out of an airplane", "if a woman is driving a car there has to be a man walking in front of her waiving two red flags", etc. I would guess that the vast majority of LEO's aren't even aware of this law and it is as close to a "non-issue" as possible. However, it's obviously a law that could get you in trouble, so TREAD LIGHTLY!!! Best to call the local authority where you're going and make sure that if you're shooting with friends or renting at a gun range you'll be ok. If they say it's good, you have plausible deniability in court should the worst ensue. Good luck, and have fun!

GaryV
07-27-2010, 12:45 PM
And here is the plain English version on ATF's FAQ page...

http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/nonimmigrant-aliens.html#rental-qualifications



I believe there are some States that allow visitors to get temporary hunting licenses online without taking a hunting class. Maybe some of the hunters here on the forum can chime in on that. If you did that then you could rent firearms while visiting any State.

Okay, so I looked up the sections of 18 U.S.C. 922 which are cited at this link. Here they are:

18 U.S.C. 922

(a) It shall be unlawful –
(5) for any person (other than a licensed importer, licensed
manufacturer, licensed dealer, or licensed collector) to
transfer, sell, trade, give, transport, or deliver any firearm to
any person (other than a licensed importer, licensed
manufacturer, licensed dealer, or licensed collector) who the
transferor knows or has reasonable cause to believe does not
reside in (or if the person is a corporation or other business
entity, does not maintain a place of business in) the State in
which the transferor resides; except that this paragraph shall
not apply to (A) the transfer, transportation, or delivery of a
firearm made to carry out a bequest of a firearm to, or an
acquisition by intestate succession of a firearm by, a person who
is permitted to acquire or possess a firearm under the laws of
the State of his residence, and (B) the loan or rental of a
firearm to any person for temporary use for lawful sporting
purposes;

(9) for any person, other than a licensed importer, licensed
manufacturer, licensed dealer, or licensed collector, who does
not reside in any State to receive any firearms unless such
receipt is for lawful sporting purposes.


So, this section does not apply unless it is a transfer (which is not the case if you take a friend/family member shooting or rent at a range, for which there is a specific exception), and does not apply if the purpose is for "lawful sporting purposes".

18 U.S.C. 922

(d) It shall be unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise
dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or
having reasonable cause to believe that such person –
(5) who, being an alien -
(B) except as provided in subsection (y)(2), has been
admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa (as
that term is defined in section 101(a)(26) of the Immigration
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(26)));


Again, this is talking about a transfer, not mere physical possession.

18 U.S.C. 922

(g) It shall be unlawful for any person –
(5) who, being an alien -
(B) except as provided in subsection (y)(2), has been
admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa (as
that term is defined in section 101(a)(26) of the Immigration
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(26)));
to ship or transport in interstate or foreign commerce, or possess
in or affecting commerce, any firearm or ammunition; or to receive
any firearm or ammunition which has been shipped or transported in
interstate or foreign commerce.


This has to do with engaging in commerce, not mere possession. However, the last phrase "or to receive any firearm or ammunition which has been shipped or transported in interstate or foreign commerce" could be construed to include mere possession as long as the gun can be shown to have been transported in commerce across state or national borders. However "receive" generally legally implies a transfer, not mere possession. And that only makes sense since this section is just the "receiving" counterpart to the "selling" language in (d)(5)(B), which is clearly about transfer, not mere possession, just as section (a)(9) is the counterpart to section (a)(5). But for even more indication that no hunting license is needed, see the exception, which is also cited:

18 U.S.C. 922

(y) Provisions Relating to Aliens Admitted Under Nonimmigrant
Visas. –
2) Exceptions. - Subsections (d)(5)(B), (g)(5)(B), and
(s)(3)(B)(v)(II) do not apply to any alien who has been lawfully
admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa, if that
alien is -
(A) admitted to the United States for lawful hunting or
sporting purposes or is in possession of a hunting license or
permit lawfully issued in the United States;


If you simply say that you came to the US for the purposes of going shooting, it would seem that the possession of a hunting license is not required, especially since "sporting purposes" other than hunting are themselves sufficient.

Edit: Having read Chainsaw's post (#9) I see that the ATF has chosen to interpret sections (d) and (g) to mean mere possession, even though the language is pretty clearly otherwise. However, section (y)(A) includes 3 exceptions, not just having a hunting license.

CHS
07-27-2010, 1:03 PM
If you simply say that you came to the US for the purposes of going shooting, it would seem that the possession of a hunting license is not required, especially since "sporting purposes" other than hunting are themselves sufficient.

I'm glad I just read this because I was about to post something about how this prohibition could never withstand a post Heller/McDonald challenge.

Fundamental rights apply to ANY lawful US visitor. Period.

Josh3239
07-27-2010, 1:15 PM
When I was in Hawaii there was a Japanese couple on their honeymoon who didn't know how to say one word in English and the rented several guns (under close supervision of the rangemaster). I am sure Vegas makes some serious money from non-citizan tourists. I think it is safe to say that this law is not enforced an with regard to renting, would impossible to enforce.

gose
07-27-2010, 2:32 PM
<snip>

Edit: Having read Chainsaw's post (#9) I see that the ATF has chosen to interpret sections (d) and (g) to mean mere possession, even though the language is pretty clearly otherwise. However, section (y)(A) includes 3 exceptions, not just having a hunting license.

Though ATF's interpretation on the first two exceptions is "attending an organized shooting event/competition or hunting trip and in possession of an approved Form 6 NIA"

Just saying you're here for hunting or sporting purposes is not enough.

When I was in Hawaii there was a Japanese couple on their honeymoon who didn't know how to say one word in English and the rented several guns (under close supervision of the rangemaster). I am sure Vegas makes some serious money from non-citizan tourists. I think it is safe to say that this law is not enforced an with regard to renting, would impossible to enforce.

Would be pretty easy to ensure compliance... Send in some ATF agents, document that the range is renting firearms to prohibited persons, charge the range and it's owners with a few felonies and shut it down and I'm sure that the renting of firearms to foreigners would disappear pretty darn quick...

chester2005
07-27-2010, 2:38 PM
hey guys what can i say???
thanks to all the comments and for the time and effort you have put into this question.
the way i read it now.....
if i am in the US for tourism and i go to a range then i am not breaking any laws???
i have no criminal record and do not know any reason why i would be unsuitable according to US law
i have used shotguns , i have handled ( a little years ago) but not fired handguns (ridiculously strict laws in UK even before they were banned) and that is what i would like to do now.

i must add... i have always found people helpful and friendly in CA (spent 4 months there over 2 years) and this forum is no exception to that...thanks again

gose
07-27-2010, 2:40 PM
the way i read it now.....
if i am in the US for tourism and i go to a range then i am not breaking any laws???


Then you read it wrong... ;)

The thread so far, compressed into two lines:
Most likely, you would be committing a felony if you go to a shooting range.
Most likely, you would not get caught.

frankm
07-27-2010, 2:46 PM
Tons of foreigner's shoot on American ranges. I seriously doubt all those ranges would do this if it was against the law. Course, some here disagree. I refer to my previous post. Chester should call the ranges directly and ask them about it.

frankm
07-27-2010, 2:54 PM
Links for Chester,
http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2006/apr/01/foreign-tourists-take-their-shot-at-gun-ranges/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8FZGJbvkL7A

gose
07-27-2010, 3:15 PM
Tons of foreigner's shoot on American ranges. I seriously doubt all those ranges would do this if it was against the law. Course, some here disagree. I refer to my previous post. Chester should call the ranges directly and ask them about it.

What's the point with that, other than potentially plausible deniability.? It's like asking a drug dealer if it's legal to do drugs...

If he thinks that 18 U.S.C. 922 doesnt apply, that it's an outdated law, a joke, and that the ATF interpretation of said paragraphs is completely wrong, my suggestion would be to contact the ATF.

frankm
07-27-2010, 3:25 PM
Gun ranges wouldn't know? Or worse yet, are like drug dealers?

gose
07-27-2010, 3:32 PM
Gun ranges wouldn't know? Or worse yet, are like drug dealers?

Sorry... my apologies.

You should always trust gun shops and gun ranges with legal advice.

I'll go away now.

chester2005
07-27-2010, 3:42 PM
is lawful sporting purposes not target practice at a range??
this is a specific exemption to being an unlawful act so surely in my case i would be ok?

CHS
07-27-2010, 3:47 PM
is lawful sporting purposes not target practice at a range??
this is a specific exemption to being an unlawful act so surely in my case i would be ok?

Chester, I think you're totally fine coming over here and shooting some guns at a rental range. Check out the analysis done in post #28:

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showpost.php?p=4684820&postcount=28

Target shooting is a lawful sporting purpose. And you're not renting the gun you're renting the use of a gun for a short period under the owners control while at an official range. This is very different from actually RENTING a gun. Here in the US it would be legal for me to rent a gun to my friend, meaning he would be able to take it home, sleep with it, put it in his safe, take it shooting/hunting, etc. When you go to a range to "rent" a gun to shoot, that's not a true rental which involves possession change.

gose
07-27-2010, 4:03 PM
Chester, I think you're totally fine coming over here and shooting some guns at a rental range. Check out the analysis done in post #28:

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showpost.php?p=4684820&postcount=28

Target shooting is a lawful sporting purpose. And you're not renting the gun you're renting the use of a gun for a short period under the owners control while at an official range. This is very different from actually RENTING a gun. Here in the US it would be legal for me to rent a gun to my friend, meaning he would be able to take it home, sleep with it, put it in his safe, take it shooting/hunting, etc. When you go to a range to "rent" a gun to shoot, that's not a true rental which involves possession change.

But that seems to contradict this (from ATF):
"What if I want to go to a shooting range one day — can I rent a firearm there as well?
As long as you possess a valid hunting license from a State within the United States, you may rent firearms to hunt and to use at a shooting range.

The statement seems to indicate a situation where you go to a range and rent a firearm at the location for use at the same location, not the different "friend rental" situation you describe.

Oh well, I promised to go away...

OleCuss
07-27-2010, 4:22 PM
I just want to second the apologies to Chester.

The law sucks and he should be able to legally use a firearm for self-defense or sporting purposes while he is visiting here. Unfortunately, the law clearly puts him at risk for felony prosecution (although the risk may be small) and I recommend he not engage in such activity.

Recheck next year and the answer may be different (but I'd not bet on it).

And my thanks to gose and chainsaw for making this all very clear. The expertise is greatly appreciated.

POLICESTATE
07-27-2010, 4:31 PM
So the take-away from all of this is that here in America, if you want to do anything fun, you're probably breaking some law, whether federal, state or local. :shrug:

HellnBack
07-27-2010, 4:47 PM
The OP is asking about range shooting & not hunting, lets talk of shooting in the range.As a visitor,legally here in cali(I-94 card) can buy a gun then how much more if he only shoots in the range. taking a class is different though,he needed a student visa but for a class of a day or two(?) Its your call Buddy.JMTC

Rekrab
07-27-2010, 4:50 PM
It seems like "Possession" is a very tricky term in the legal world. While our friend from across the pond may have actual possession, it seems as though the actual owner would still maintain constructive possession.

I had no idea there was so much to it: http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/possession

kel-tec-innovations
07-27-2010, 11:02 PM
Wrong. In order for a person to have possession of a gun, they need to either be a US citizen (let's skip over the various prohibited categories like felons), or be a permanent resident (colloquially known as "green card"), or they have to have a valid hunting license from a state in the US. And the moment you rent or borrow a gun, you have possession of it.

This is federal law. Look it up in some ATF rule book, or contact the ATF. Since it is federal law, it also applies in Las Vegas.

Now, some shooting ranges are ignorant of this rule, and are willing to rent guns to non-residents without hunting licenses. That's a serious crime in the making.

I don't know how difficult it is to obtain a hunting license for a non-resident (tourist). The class typically takes a weekend, but I don't know whether non-residents are even allowed to take it. The only person I know who is a non-resident with a US hunting license got his hunting license by bringing a hunting license from his country of origin to California, and since his country has much more stringent rules for hunting licenses, he was issued a license without having to take the class.

If you want to do gun training while traveling: Israel has some very good programs that cater to foreigners. I have no personal experience with that, but a German friend of mine did a few training classes there.

Its renting not owning or possessing, besides there is a fire arms instructor by the renter majority of the time if not all the time

Mssr. Eleganté
07-28-2010, 6:04 AM
Its renting not owning or possessing, besides there is a fire arms instructor by the renter majority of the time if not all the time

So, you're saying that convicted felons also can rent a gun to shoot as long as the instructor stands right next to them? What about ammo? Are they renting the ammo or owning/possessing it?

chester2005
08-01-2010, 5:29 AM
many thanks for all the comments i will give it some more thought, and weigh up the possibilities.
i still want to go to a range and shoot things that are stupidly illegal to own in the UK
if it is common practice at ranges for non resident aliens then it would seem as long as there are no issues when i am there it seems highly unlikely for it to be a problem.

Chester

norcal.xd
08-01-2010, 6:37 AM
or make some friends with someone who owns an ar or ak

Mssr. Eleganté
08-01-2010, 10:37 AM
...if it is common practice at ranges for non resident aliens then it would seem as long as there are no issues when i am there it seems highly unlikely for it to be a problem.

I you want to CYA then just get the Texas non-resident special 5 day hunting license for $48 and you will be good to go.

cortayack
08-01-2010, 11:23 AM
many thanks for all the comments i will give it some more thought, and weigh up the possibilities.
i still want to go to a range and shoot things that are stupidly illegal to own in the UK
if it is common practice at ranges for non resident aliens then it would seem as long as there are no issues when i am there it seems highly unlikely for it to be a problem.

Chester


If you want to shoot things that are stupidly illegal to own in the UK then go to Las Vegas, NV...........:43:



Enjoy your stay, have fun, be safe.............................;)