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Falstaff
07-25-2010, 5:43 PM
I'm wondering if anyone might share their practice routine with the group. Specifically, what range (distance not location) you like to practice at, amount of ammo per session, exercise or other things you might do in preparation, stuff like that. I'd like to maximize my learning/skill with minimum ammo. I have a 1911 and several polymer pistols, and I can hit the targets OK but I want to get to the next level. I seem to have plateau'd out, I practice 2-3 days a month, but I don't feel like I'm getting better. I still catch myself flinching quite noticably now and again, I really need to stop that. I'd be especially interested in any trigger control routines that might help.

Hornetsnest
07-25-2010, 6:03 PM
1. Dry firing
- I hate doing it, but no reason to be wasting good ammo when the problem can be fixed with other methods. Video tape yourself and play it back, watching for a smooth trigger press and how much the barrel moves.

2. Schools/Classes
- Have you been to any formal shooting schools or classes lately? Even though someone may be a great shot or one of those "know it all" shooters, everyone can take some lessons away or have good habits reenforced at a good shooting school or class.

3. Rangetime
- Short and effective is what I prefer (50-100rds per gun). I watch some guys go to the range with 500+ rounds and proceed to just blow paper away with no rhyme or reason. While this might be a great stress reliever, it does little to maxmize the rounds from a training aspect.


Just one man's 2 cents....:)

Falstaff
07-25-2010, 6:14 PM
Videotaping some dryfire practice is a GREAT idea! Thanks; never woulda thought of doing that and it's cheap! My wife will think it's weird, but so what. I've done the frontsight 4 day defensive handgun, learned ALOT and will be going back in the fall. (My goal is get the DG (distinguished Graduate) and a perfect score on the qual. target (I got -6 on it my first time which was not a bad score, but perfect is better!)

l8apex
07-25-2010, 6:27 PM
I use this to get sured up. From M4Carbine.
Hey guys this is one of our favourite drills, sorry about the format, couldn't figure out how to insert a table.....have fun

Handgun Standard Exercise: Hackathorn Standards
Course Designer: Ken Hackathorn
Source: Larry Vickers (former CAG Lead Firearms Instructor)

300 Points 60 Rounds No Make Up Shots
IPSC Target:
A = 5 C = 3 D = 2 Entire Head = 5
All stages start holstered unless otherwise noted.
250+ Expert
200-249 Acceptable
Below 200 Needs Improvement

Notes:
Originally designed for IPSC targets; IDPA target are slightly more difficult (smaller 5 zone).
Highest Score Ever: Larry Vickers 298
Highest First Time Score: Rob Leatham 290
Jerry Barnhart's First Time Score: 277

Targets: 3 IPSC, 1m spacing, staggered medium-high-low height

#1--5 yards--1 rd on each head from draw freestyle--3 sec
#2--5 yards--1 rd on each head strong hand--4 sec
#3--5 yards--1 rd on each body strong hand--3 sec
#4--5 yards--1 rd on each body strong hand--3 sec
#5--8 yards--2 rds on left target freestyle--2 sec
#6--8 yards--2 rds on center target freestyle--2 sec
#7--8 yards--2 rds on right target freestyle--2 sec
#8--10 yards--El Presidente; start facing uprange w/6 rds in gun, turn and draw, 2 rds each target, slide lock reload, 2 rds on each target--10 seconds
#9--10 yards--weak hand pickup; gun on ground, butt to strong side, start standing, strong hand in small of back, retrieve handgun, 1 rd on each target--5 sec
#10--12 to 8 yards--2 rds each target while moving forward from 12 yds--5 sec
#11--15 yards--transition drill; start with hands at shoulder level as if holding rifle, 1 rd on each target--4 sec
#12--20 yards--start standing; drop to prone, 2 rds on each target--10 sec
#13--25 yards--start behind barricade; 2 rds on each target standing, perform tactical reload under cover(retain/stow partial mag), 2 rds on each target kneeling--24 sec

6114DAVE
07-25-2010, 6:32 PM
I practice with a little bit of stuff i've learned from the Corps. Failure drills, controlled pairs, hammer pairs(fun!)...then i switch to one handed,then weak-handed. then i do things like put a spent casing in of each my 3 mags and differ the amount per MAG...then i shuffle them while not looking at them....that way i can practice speed reloads and immdeiate action drills....finish off with GRAB GUN SIGHT IN AND EMPTY MAG AT CENTER MASS ASAP... i use about 200 rounds per session at least once a month...less per session if i plan to do it more than once a month

JTROKS
07-25-2010, 6:32 PM
I do more dry firing than range time now a days. I'd like to have more range time, but gotta work for the rugrats.

6114DAVE
07-25-2010, 6:36 PM
oh yeah i do most of my drill at 7 and 15 yds and some at 25yds...but i practice for a pistol confrontation...more than likely it's gonna be pretty close distance....if it's more than 30 or so yards...time to take cover and go tacticool

asme
07-25-2010, 6:43 PM
A friend and I go to the range together and we load each others' magazines with a few snap caps interspersed between live rounds so we can see if we're jerking the trigger. Each person loads the other one's rounds so we don't know where the snap caps will be. It's the single best thing that's happened to our trigger control.

We shoot fantastically ;)

And if you're really http://i.somethingawful.com/forumsystem/emoticons/emot-bustem.png about it it's a way to *snort* practice tap rack bang hurr durr durr

BigDogatPlay
07-25-2010, 6:52 PM
The routine from l8apex above is, IMO, for more advanced shooters, and note that not even world class shooters can clean it. That, to me, is a nice place to get to, but is not an exercise I would recommend to anyone who feels (as the OP does) that they are not improving. Bear in mind also that the exercise involves draw and presentation and most ranges I am familiar with will not allow working from a holster.

That said, I dry fire.... a lot. Always have. I try to focus in any session on fundamentals; grip, sight alignment, trigger press. One out of every four or so sessions I shoot all bullseye. A PPC type of course, without the draw and such, is a good (for me) bullseye test and shooting at 7, 15 out to 25 or even 50 yards.

For defensive drills, when I can't use a holster because of the facility I like to work on a standard silhouette target. IPSC or IDPA targets will also work, they just aren't what I use to practice generally. I start at three yards, from low ready, deliver single shots to center mass for five shots, decocking and lowering after each shot. Then I deliver double taps for ten rounds. Repeat process for 5, 10 and 15 yards. If I have someone with me to call targets, and the range allows it, I'll do a Mozambique drill a couple of times through.

Not nearly as much as I used to, and only when I work with a revolver, I'll do some point shooting at varying distances. This is more for fun and instilling grip and trigger press than for anything else.

Bottom line, seek outside training. You can't correct your own flaws, only compensate for them.

jdg30
07-25-2010, 7:50 PM
I like to shoot minimal rounds every time I practice and I try to shoot one or two guns at the most each time. I usually shoot a few magazines to 50 rounds per gun, per time. I try to shoot at least 2 times per week like that. I usually set up an old barricade with a sillouette and some paper plates stapled to it and practice drills from 3,5,7 and 10 yards.

Each time I switch it up, but I like to shoot up close and personal, like if someone tried to strong arm you or attack you up close and you back up, draw and fire a couple rounds. If I haven't shot a gun in a while I will get associated with it by shooting from either 7 or 10 yards and then start closer drills.

I don't spend much time shooting from far distances because in reality I'm not going to use my CCW guns to shoot at someone who is far away. I like to practice drawing from a holster and making my shots count. I also practice drills side stepping, drawing and firing, and also drawing and firing while backing up to get away from a threat and out of a situation.

I don't shoot large amounts of ammo each time because I can't afford to and also I think I get more out of each session if I shoot a little bit each time and reflect on what I did right or wrong and then work on it more next time.

Greg-Dawg
07-25-2010, 7:55 PM
Take a class and apply what you learned at the range.

BamBam-31
07-25-2010, 8:01 PM
I've been playing hockey for over a dozen years now. Everyone--and I mean EVERYONE--that plays at our level has done mind-numbing skating drills to some extent or other. No getting around it, you just have to put your hours in to develop the necessary balance, skill set, muscle memory, etc.

Dry fire is the same. You'll be hard-pressed to find a top pistol shooter that hasn't put in hours of dry fire to smooth out and perfect his trigger pull. Sure, you'll get the occasional prodigy here and there that can simply blow out the X like he was born to do it. For us Regular Joes, however, dry fire and .22lr's are where it's at. ;)

9mmepiphany
07-25-2010, 8:46 PM
if you really want to improve you shooting, taking a good shooting class will be the most productive route. they'll straighten out your bad habits and give you drills you can practice on your own to keep getting better

take a look at this thread. Bruce Gray is coming to Merced. he is an excellent instructor
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=322253

vNaK
07-25-2010, 8:58 PM
Like everyone else said, dry fire.

I like to put dummy rounds in my mag when I go shoot. Helps me notice what I'm doing wrong.

Using less ammo per session. Used to shoot 200 rounds per session, but I use 50-100 rounds now. I make sure every round counts.

I used to use a mag loader to load my mags, but I have opt to load by hand now (especially when I'm shooting so little). It helps me slow things down and gives me a break in between shootings.

OneSevenDeuce
07-25-2010, 8:59 PM
If you feel like you are hitting your peak at your current skill level you might try attending an IDPA or other type competition. I don't know if you have or not before, but shooting at a competitive level makes you better. It really does. I don't know what your goals are, but if you are like me and just want to get tactically better (in my case for professional reasons) then competing can't be beat. I've done a few and I am a better marksman for it. That, and most of the people there are more than willing to help a guy out with tips and tricks.

viet4lifeOC
07-25-2010, 9:21 PM
HELP:

I can dry fire my Sig P6 cause it has a hammer, but how do you dry fire a SA XD? Once you fire the XD if you rack the slide--the snap caps ejects. There's no hammer to pull back to practice even the SA mode.

thanks

OneSevenDeuce
07-25-2010, 9:23 PM
HELP:

I can dry fire my Sig P6 cause it has a hammer, but how do you dry fire a SA XD? Once you fire the XD if you rack the slide--the snap caps ejects. There's no hammer to pull back to practice even the SA mode.

thanks

Put a new snap cap in.

They come in packs of four or five.

I don't own an XD, but if it is like a Glock the trigger will reset if you pull the slide partly to the rear, but not enough to eject the snap cap.

bballwizard05
07-25-2010, 9:35 PM
can i dry fire without snap caps? or is this a big no no even in my tank ruger p95?

HkFan416
07-25-2010, 9:41 PM
HELP:

I can dry fire my Sig P6 cause it has a hammer, but how do you dry fire a SA XD? Once you fire the XD if you rack the slide--the snap caps ejects. There's no hammer to pull back to practice even the SA mode.

thanks


On XD's you don't have to rack the slide all the way back to reset the striker. All you have to do is pull it back about a quarter inch and it will reset itself.

HkFan416
07-25-2010, 9:44 PM
can i dry fire without snap caps? or is this a big no no even in my tank ruger p95?

Yes you can. Most modern firearms can take dry firing no problem, especially striker fired pistols. One of the modern firearms that I know of that's bad to dry fire, is the Beretta 92fs. They are supposedly prone to firing pin breakage, once dry firing is often applied.

bballwizard05
07-25-2010, 9:46 PM
Yes you can. Most modern firearms can take dry fire damage no problem, especially striker fired pistols. One of the modern firearms that I know of that's bad to dry fire, is the Beretta 92fs. They are supposedly prone to firing pin breakage, once dry firing is often applied.


can you elaborate a little on this part? so it will damage it some but with no ill effect?

HkFan416
07-25-2010, 10:20 PM
can you elaborate a little on this part? so it will damage it some but with no ill effect?

Actually, I need to edit that. What I meant to say was that, most modern firearms can take dry firing no problem. No damage will occur from dry firing modern pistols.

bballwizard05
07-25-2010, 10:31 PM
oh got it. thanks

AlliedArmory
07-25-2010, 10:50 PM
Dry firing at home. Then when I hit the indoor range it's usually at 7-10 yrds and 25 yrds outdoors.

bjl333
07-25-2010, 10:50 PM
When I was younger (25+ yrs ago !!) I use to dry fire a lot with a double action revolver. Those exercise taught me about trigger control. If you could keep the gun pointed at the same target after you dry fired then you know you didn't flinched. I carry this exercise to the range. I would ask my dad or whoever I was shooting with to load up my revolver with random live rounds. I would shoot the gun in double action just like I practiced at home. This exercise have taught me to really control the trigger without flinching, and I would rapid fire with the random live chamber. You could tell how badly you are flinching once you hit a empty chamber.

To this day I still favor revolvers and I still shoot them double action. I own some DA pistols and the exercise transitioned well to those guns as well. I hope this made sense to you ... Good Luck !!!

MAC USMC
07-25-2010, 10:53 PM
Most shooters will experience changes in their physical skills and deterioration in eyesight over time. It will change your practice habits, at least it should, and it helps to truly know what your limitations are. In the USMC I had 20-15 vision and could see bullet holes at a considerable distance. Now, at age 76, l limit my shooting practice mostly to 5 - 15 yards with some 25 yards shots just to maintain my confidence level. I have found that TRIGGER SQUEEZE is the most daunting skill to maintain and I must consciously work on it.

Maintaining proper "sight picture" is difficult for us old dudes so I tend to concentrate more on the FRONT SIGHT

windrunner
07-26-2010, 7:37 AM
1. Dry firing
- I hate doing it, but no reason to be wasting good ammo when the problem can be fixed with other methods. Video tape yourself and play it back, watching for a smooth trigger press and how much the barrel moves.

2. Schools/Classes
- Have you been to any formal shooting schools or classes lately? Even though someone may be a great shot or one of those "know it all" shooters, everyone can take some lessons away or have good habits reenforced at a good shooting school or class.

3. Rangetime
- Short and effective is what I prefer (50-100rds per gun). I watch some guys go to the range with 500+ rounds and proceed to just blow paper away with no rhyme or reason. While this might be a great stress reliever, it does little to maxmize the rounds from a training aspect.


Just one man's 2 cents....:)

this.......in a nutshell

I'll see your 2 cents and raise you 2 more cents

mif_slim
07-26-2010, 9:23 AM
I go to the range, put my pistol target 100 yards and close my eyes and fire away... if I can hit one out of 250...Im happy. ;)

jk..

I usually shoot 15 yards, then move out to 25. Each session is about 250-300 rounds, thats 2-3 times per week. If time permits 5 times per week, but thats rear now since I've gotten really busy.

Usually amount of time is spent on trigger control and front sight picture.

wsmc27
07-26-2010, 10:00 AM
When I was younger (25+ yrs ago !!) I use to dry fire a lot with a double action revolver. Those exercise taught me about trigger control. If you could keep the gun pointed at the same target after you dry fired then you know you didn't flinched. I carry this exercise to the range. I would ask my dad or whoever I was shooting with to load up my revolver with random live rounds. I would shoot the gun in double action just like I practiced at home. This exercise have taught me to really control the trigger without flinching, and I would rapid fire with the random live chamber. You could tell how badly you are flinching once you hit a empty chamber.

To this day I still favor revolvers and I still shoot them double action. I own some DA pistols and the exercise transitioned well to those guns as well. I hope this made sense to you ... Good Luck !!!

^^^ awesome ideas.

We do that with the Super Blackhawk sometimes. Wheeeeeee! :D

j1133s
07-26-2010, 10:08 AM
I'm wondering if anyone might share their practice routine with the group. Specifically, what range (distance not location) you like to practice at, amount of ammo per session, exercise or other things you might do in preparation, stuff like that. I'd like to maximize my learning/skill with minimum ammo. I have a 1911 and several polymer pistols, and I can hit the targets OK but I want to get to the next level. I seem to have plateau'd out, I practice 2-3 days a month, but I don't feel like I'm getting better. I still catch myself flinching quite noticably now and again, I really need to stop that. I'd be especially interested in any trigger control routines that might help.

If you give more details of your skill level, I may be able to provide you better answer. A good way to check your skill is to shoot a local competition that you like. For example, shoot an action pistol and see where you stand; shoot bullseye and what's your score?

Practicing 2-3 times /month is pretty good. If you send 100-200rnds down range each trip, inside a year, you can probably score in the top 25-50% of any match. That should give you some idea of the amount of practice many people do.

Flinch is normal but see if you can remove it before firing or definitely remove it on the next round. The way to work it out is to shoot many rnds and pay attention to each rnd fired.

If ammo cost is becoming an issue, you can do a lot of practice at home (depending on what your goals are). You can also buy a .22LR pistol/rifle and practice with that instead of your 1911. (I'm selling a .22LR kit for your 1911 so you get the same trigger and ergos but shoot .22LR... you'll get your money back in a few range trips... check my classified ad)

PatriotnMore
07-26-2010, 10:13 AM
Dry fire, quick reload, drawing and point shooting at home, developing muscle memory.

l_Z_l
07-26-2010, 10:29 AM
I dry fire more nowadays, lack of funds. I also take my snap caps to the range, so when I feel like I'm off I'll just practice a bit w/ the snap cap before getting back on it.

I like angeles pistol range, hitting all the smaller steels all out to 100 consistantly is where I want to be.

Vacaville
07-26-2010, 10:50 AM
I dry fire and handle my guns almost daily - usually just pick one and sit with it watching TV. Gets you used to your guns. I carried this over from playing guitar. When I started 30+ years ago, I had an experienced musician tell me to carry the guitar with me everywhere, and play it whenever I felt like it. You become one with the tool of your trade, whether guitar or gun.

At the range (indoor):

I shoot a mag or cylinder (for revolvers) at 7, 10, and 15 yards using a two handed grip taking my time for accuracy. I then shoot again at 7 with the right hand only, then load again and do the left. Then I back the target out to 10 and, using the targets that have one circle in the middle and four smaller circles around the outside, I shoot various patterns around the sheet emphasizing getting my sights on target quickly - top/bottom, diagonals, right-left. That's about all I can do at the range. There's no holster draw or rapid fire allowed, so I'm kind of limited on what I can do.

Rinse and repeat for each gun I brought to the range that day.

I usually go through about 100 centerfire and 200 .22 rounds each outing.

DaveFJ80
07-26-2010, 11:14 AM
IMO, if you're practicing at the range (indoor for example), I would place the silhouette target at a distance that would be a real-world possiblity with a HD scenario... if that's what you're training for. No point putting the target 15-25 yards out, unless you live on a huge ranch and live inside a huge mansion where you need to shoot a great distance. I see no point shooting a handgun 50-100 yards and hitting the paper or steel targets. No point other than to look cool doing it or what not. I'll usually put my targets at approx 7-10 yards out if I do these types of drills at indoor ranges.

When I say drills at an indoor range, I'll usually hold the firearm downward at a 45 degree angle & pointed towards the ground (pointed down range & finger off the trigger), and then bring it up quickly and aim & shoot once or twice right away to see where I'm putting the shots. I'll move my stance around in the booth, as there's only so much you can do in a small booth. I'll also keep my eyes off the target until I have the gun pointed at it and ready to shoot. Basically, you're trying to give yourself a scenario where somebody is out ahead of you and you need to draw your weapon and fire. IMO, it works well with shot placements, and decision making. Shooting at stationary paper targets is nice to improve on your gun control and aim, but in a real-world situation you probably won't have the luxury of sitting there and waiting to aim your gun at somebody who's about to endanger your life.

This will only do so much for you. If you really want to be versed and better trained with more practice, take some handgun classes. I've taken a couple of different ones so far. Both taught different methods, but I took the things from each that worked the best for me and incorporate those into my own practice & use now. Plus, a class will give you better HD scenarios where you can actually move on your feet and make live decisions while moving and shooting at stationary and/or moving targets.

illuminate10
07-26-2010, 11:57 AM
1. Dry firing
- I hate doing it, but no reason to be wasting good ammo when the problem can be fixed with other methods. Video tape yourself and play it back, watching for a smooth trigger press and how much the barrel moves.

2. Schools/Classes
- Have you been to any formal shooting schools or classes lately? Even though someone may be a great shot or one of those "know it all" shooters, everyone can take some lessons away or have good habits reenforced at a good shooting school or class.

3. Rangetime
- Short and effective is what I prefer (50-100rds per gun). I watch some guys go to the range with 500+ rounds and proceed to just blow paper away with no rhyme or reason. While this might be a great stress reliever, it does little to maxmize the rounds from a training aspect.


Just one man's 2 cents....:)

Wow, excellent advice on the video of dry firing. If there was A THANK YOU OPTION I would apply it for your post there sir/ms.

Dry fire, quick reload, drawing and point shooting at home, developing muscle memory.

Short and to the point.....I was going to emphasize not only the sights when shooting but POINT SHOOTING out to 7 yds or so. I found that I was just as accurate point shooting up close as using my sights on rapid fire.


Also if you can, practice some hip shooting up to 3 yds or so and drawing from a holster......just in case it comes the time when you might have to fire fast from that position.
Might not be neccessary but it's fun :43:

HighLander51
07-26-2010, 12:17 PM
This is how I practice

http://nrg.jvdynamics.com/nrg/

MarioS
07-26-2010, 1:20 PM
For trigger control, I like to mix in some rounds with no powder or primers in them with my other loaded ammunition. I make it so I don't know where in the magazines they are. When that firing pin strikes a round with no primer, you will see just how much you are flinching and how much your front sight is moving off of your intended impact location. I handload so I can do this easily. If you don't, mixing in some Snap Caps would accomplish the same purpose. Just hide a few in different magazines and mix the magazines around without looking at them so you don't know where you've loaded the Snap Caps. Focus on zero movement in that front sight when you pull the trigger all the way through.

Do this enough and it will start to become a part of how you naturally fire your gun. I find that I can practice a lot of this dry fire stuff, but if I don't do it enough to make it second nature, the second I start doing a scenario training day and I'm firing my weapon under stress, all that dry-fire goes out the window.

BamBam-31
07-26-2010, 1:45 PM
Has anyone mentioned the dime balancing thing for practicing trigger pull? Balance a dime on top of your slide, and squeeeeeeze the trigger smoothly til it breaks W/O dropping the dime. Helps you concentrate on a smooth, flinch-free pull.

Also, just aim at a small point on the wall when dry firing. The front sight should stay on the small aim point during the entire pull, smooth and steady, from beginning to break, or you're doing it wrong.

And invest in a Mk. III or Buckmark for tons of excellent and inexpensive live practice at the range. :thumbsup:

NorCalMama
07-26-2010, 2:02 PM
I'm wondering if anyone might share their practice routine with the group. Specifically, what range (distance not location) you like to practice at, amount of ammo per session, exercise or other things you might do in preparation, stuff like that. I'd like to maximize my learning/skill with minimum ammo. I have a 1911 and several polymer pistols, and I can hit the targets OK but I want to get to the next level. I seem to have plateau'd out, I practice 2-3 days a month, but I don't feel like I'm getting better. I still catch myself flinching quite noticably now and again, I really need to stop that. I'd be especially interested in any trigger control routines that might help.

Have you taken lessons? Seriously, that is the biggest help. Having someone who knows what they're doing not only instructing you but also watching what you're doing so you can get knowledgable input. Then, once you are given basics, I'd say dry fire at home, go to the range 2-4 times each month, get involved in IDPA, and just keep on... over time you'll improve, it's just a matter of sticking with it and being willing to get help. :)

gorenut
07-26-2010, 2:28 PM
I found dry firing to be of greatest help. You focus on just one thing and that's it, your trigger pull. I had a .22lr conversion kit, but it didn't work for me as a practice tool. It was definitely fun, but I think the sights on my .22lr differed too much from my original sites. Also, you NEED specific ammo or a third of your time is spent fiddling with FTF ammo.

viet4lifeOC
07-26-2010, 2:41 PM
Call of Duty: Modern Warfare. eNuff said

Donk310
07-26-2010, 3:45 PM
I don't really practice. I just put a magazine in and go for the real deal. I guess you can say I practice by doing it for real.

Flouncer
07-26-2010, 5:46 PM
http://www.ruger.com/service/FAQs.html

Can I dry fire my Ruger P-Series and .22 pistols?
Yes. All Ruger pistols can be dry fired without damage, and dry firing can be useful to familiarize the owner with the firearm. However, be sure any firearm is completely unloaded before dry firing!

I put snap caps in anyways. 4 for less than a twelver of good beer :cowboy:

SuperSet
07-26-2010, 5:54 PM
Check out Ben Stoeger's dry fire program here:
http://benstoeger.com/

15 minutes a day will measurably improve your gun handling and shooting abilities.

eccvets
07-26-2010, 6:06 PM
i like to pratice with live ammo and aim at my wall. :D
snap caps are for wimps

Mr_Monkeywrench
07-26-2010, 6:20 PM
what I do to help with trigger control is I sit on my couch at home and point the pistol (empty of course) at something, like your wife's expensive decoration pieces :). Get your sight alignment on and focus so hard on that front sight that if there was something written on it you could read it. Then press the trigger smoothly almost like your trying to press farther than it should go. once you've accomplished that you will notice any movement in the front sight. If it jerks at all, keep on practicing until it doesn't. then once that is achieved, do it about 10,000 more times and you should be good to go ;)

Also when Im at the range, I tend to dry fire until My sight doesn't move and then I go live. I usually practice anywhere from 3-25 yards. I practice mag changes, failure drills, shooting with a flashlight (which my range is cool with), shooting from the chest at 3 yards, controlled pairs, and mag dumps. But the best thing I ever did was take a class. usually go through 50-100 rounds. I try to make it to the range once a month

sniper4usmc
07-26-2010, 6:46 PM
I play NERF with my son,,He has Aimpoint mounted on his Nerf

Falstaff
07-26-2010, 7:45 PM
I do have a a MkIII - question is; does practice with .22LR relate well when jumping up to larger calbers? truth be told, my favorite gun to shoot for the pure fun factor is my MkIII hunter with a red dot sight. I love the dime balancing act suggestion, I will try that tonight. Thanks for all the ideas. Mixing snap caps into magazines is a great idea too, I've done something similar with my first wheelgun (a ruger GP 100 .357) which when shooting magnums, I really started flinching, leaving an empty chamber or two and spinning the cylinder really helps to cure or at least point out the flinch.

jptsr1
07-26-2010, 8:07 PM
.....Specifically, what range (distance not location) you like to practice at, amount of ammo per session...

I generally throw 100 to 150 rounds per gun down range. Rarely do I bring more than 3 guns at a time with me. I normally shoot distances inside of 25 yards as that is just a tad longer than the longest hallway in my house. I also spend some time at the end of the session shooting without my glasses (corrective lenses I mean) and without the range light on. I figure those will be closer to the actual conditions if I'm awaken my a bump in the night. I also spend a longer time with whatever gun i currently keep in the night stand (currently a 229 in .40) than with the other guns i bring with me.

j1133s
07-27-2010, 11:04 AM
I do have a a MkIII - question is; does practice with .22LR relate well when jumping up to larger calbers?


Yes, it does. Shoot 500rnds of .22LR and I'd bet you'll observe improvements in your centerfire. In fact, most bullseye shooter's scores are pretty much the same for .22/CF/.45 !

BamBam-31
07-27-2010, 11:41 AM
You need a .22lr w/ iron sights for practice and one for red dot blasting. ;)

Shooting a .22lr and shooting a .50 DE uses EXACTLY the same technique. The only difference is felt recoil AFTER you've already executed your perfect sight alignment, trigger squeeze, and slowed breathing. You just have to hold on a little firmer to get the front sight back on target. Other than that, if you can shoot a .22lr at uber-jedi bullseye levels, 100% of that technique should translate to centerfires. IOW, .22lr's are GREAT training tools. :thumbsup:

shooting4life
07-27-2010, 12:10 PM
I do my practicing on the Internet.

eric2063
07-27-2010, 12:23 PM
I think Hornetsnest nailed it along with balancing a dime or quarter on the weapon while dry firing. The only thing I might suggest is when you go to the range go with a trusted (preferably experienced) partner and have them watch you shoot, do a critique of your performance on the course of fire, then you should switch positions.

This does two things, first it gives you an idea of where you need improvement or corrections (much like videotaping the course of fire but with a 3-D view and feed back) the second is it helps whomever is in the observer role become a better shooter as well. I really enjoyed being a range master because it improved my skills while I was able to help the other shooters at the same time, oh and it increased my range time exponentially as well :D

These threads always are some of the best to read all the way through, I’m glad they come up every so often just for the shear volume of information they generate

ArcLight
07-27-2010, 12:42 PM
Hope everyone who is dry firing is using snap caps.

j1133s
07-27-2010, 12:50 PM
I do my practicing on the Internet.

I don't even need internet. I just practice by thnking about it and then post the results on the net.

BamBam-31
07-27-2010, 1:19 PM
I found dry firing to be of greatest help. You focus on just one thing and that's it, your trigger pull. I had a .22lr conversion kit, but it didn't work for me as a practice tool. It was definitely fun, but I think the sights on my .22lr differed too much from my original sites. Also, you NEED specific ammo or a third of your time is spent fiddling with FTF ammo.

AKA Malfunction Drills. ;)

Hornetsnest
07-27-2010, 6:29 PM
what I do to help with trigger control is I sit on my couch at home and point the pistol (empty of course) at something, like your wife's expensive decoration pieces :).

It should go without saying, but...BE CAREFUL!!!

http://hamptonroads.com/2010/06/chesapeake-marine-guilty-accidentally-killing-infant-child

modls7
07-27-2010, 7:37 PM
At Home:
1) Dry Fire
2) Presentations
3) Holster Draws
4) Various Reloads

At range 2-3 times a month:
1) Start out at 10-12 yards. I like to not use a target and use cardboard backing and try and shoot the same hole/through the same hole.
2) Back it out to 15 yards
3) Back it out 20-25 yards and try and hold in the 7 ring.
4) Bring back to 12-15 yards, put up the target with 5 mini targets on it and practice from a draw, low ready, reloads, double taps, mag dumps.

All in all about 250 rounds.

Oh and at least a match every month. I try and make 3, and video tape those as well. Gotta love the young single life :)

Sajedene
07-27-2010, 7:44 PM
I usually go to the range close to me with people who know what they are doing and have them tell me what I need to do right and go with that. So far, so good!

j1133s
07-28-2010, 8:56 AM
I usually go to the range close to me with people who know what they are doing and have them tell me what I need to do right and go with that. So far, so good!

What if they don't know what they're doing but just pretending to know :)

ZX-10R
07-28-2010, 9:19 AM
Start at 25yrds with my PSL, WASR, and PSL...Then I move it out to 50 yrds, then I move it to 100yrds...After that the PSL goes past at intervals of 25-50 and up to 400yrds. The AR will go up to 200yrds but after that I do not see it as my "go to" gun...My PSL is money after that and will walk some precision rifles easily.

BamBam-31
07-28-2010, 9:31 AM
What if they don't know what they're doing but just pretending to know :)

If it's my friends from the recent Burbank meets, then they know what they're doing. ;)

ZX-10R
07-28-2010, 9:33 AM
Oh yeah I shoot ~400+ rounds per sitting/ standing/ kneeling. I shoot every other week or every two weeks, so I get my fill.