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View Full Version : Aftermarket slide stop levers for XD


Dreaded Claymore
07-21-2010, 8:39 PM
Does anyone know if there are any aftermarket, extended slide stop levers for the Springfield XD, that would make it easier to release the slide when it's locked back?

MA2
07-21-2010, 9:52 PM
I do not have either, but see good reviews on both...

http://xdguys.com/shoppingcart/products.php?product=XDguys-Extended-Slide-Stop

http://www.pistolgear.com/proddetail.php?prod=00PG037

pontiacpratt
07-21-2010, 9:55 PM
That's funny I just replaced my Storm's standard lever with a slim one. The large lever it came with dug into my thumb. I really never used it so I figured I'd make it smaller.

CGT80
07-24-2010, 11:52 PM
I love the pistolgear slide stop and maximum mag well.

Soldier415
07-25-2010, 12:13 AM
Does anyone know if there are any aftermarket, extended slide stop levers for the Springfield XD, that would make it easier to release the slide when it's locked back?
Not to sound like a Richard Cranium, but it is called a slide stop for a reason.

Proper method for release of slide is by pulling back and letting go.

sd_shooter
07-25-2010, 7:42 AM
Not to sound like a Richard Cranium, but it is called a slide stop for a reason.

Proper method for release of slide is by pulling back and letting go.

+1. If anything, the XD could use a smaller slide stop so it would be out of the way!

CGT80
07-25-2010, 2:13 PM
The pistol gear slide stop is smaller and bigger at the same time :43:

It is thinner than the original. It does not extend down the frame, from the slide, as far as the factory part. Some people find that they are less likely to accidentally hit it with their thumbs. I haven't had that problem though. It is longer, front to back, which makes it easier for people with smaller hands to release or lock the slide. Also, the stop is wider than the factory one. It extends out to the side further. It is as if there is a shelf for your thumb to push up or pull down on.

I use the slide stop as a slide release for competition. It is much faster than racking the slide. I can and will rack it if I have a failure, but so far I have not had any problems and others do the same, however, my gun is setup as a race gun, not a self defense gun. If it breaks, no big deal. It seems similar to the dry firing topic. Some people do it and some don't. On a carry or home defense gun I wouldn't blame a person for not dry firing or releasing with the slide stop, unless necessary.

Gryff
07-25-2010, 3:01 PM
Not to sound like a Richard Cranium, but it is called a slide stop for a reason.

Proper method for release of slide is by pulling back and letting go.

Incorrect. The proper method, for some people, is pulling back and letting go. For other people, it's using the release lever. What's most important is picking one, training like crazy with the technique, and then sticking to it.

+1. If anything, the XD could use a smaller slide stop so it would be out of the way!

Agreed. If you you are right-handed and use a thumbs-forward shooting grip, your support hand thumb tends to rest right on the release lever. This will often cause the gun to not lock back after firing the last round. You have to teach yourself to actually move that thumb out away from the side of the gun to solve the problem.

Sunday
07-25-2010, 6:40 PM
Pull the slide back.

HkFan416
07-25-2010, 10:51 PM
As Sunday said, I think you should learn to start applying your hand to the rear of the slide and pulling it back. The reason I advocate this is because its ambidextrous.

A good idea for the extended slide release, however, is that usually on the XD's (when shooting right handed) your thumb will sometimes engage the release once you've expended all of your ammunition. This can be a pain since you would have to rack the slide back again to chamber a new round from your new magazine.

Bob Hostetter
07-26-2010, 8:18 AM
When reloading any pistol under conditions where time is important, it is much faster to release the slide by using the slide release then by pulling back on the slide manually. It add's seconds to an act that should take barely over a second to begin with.

Training provides individuals with the skills necessary to manipulate the controls on their firearms under stress.

Gryff
07-26-2010, 9:32 AM
As Sunday said, I think you should learn to start applying your hand to the rear of the slide and pulling it back. The reason I advocate this is because its ambidextrous, in case your strong hand has failed for some reason.

If your strong hand has failed, how are you got to use it to grip the slide and pull it back? It would be faster to hook the rear sight on your belt/pocket and pull it back that way.

As an aside, everyone should give thought to what the will do if they lose the use of their strong hand in a fight. How are you going to reload? Clear a malfunction? These are not difficult things to do with only your support hand, but you really want to know how to do them before your life depends upon it.

HkFan416
07-26-2010, 3:34 PM
When reloading any pistol under conditions where time is important, it is much faster to release the slide by using the slide release then by pulling back on the slide manually. It add's seconds to an act that should take barely over a second to begin with.

Training provides individuals with the skills necessary to manipulate the controls on their firearms under stress.


When shooting IDPA, I don't notice a difference. To me it's just a lot faster and simpler to use and in case I have to transition to weak hand shooting, my muscle memory would still apply.

HkFan416
07-26-2010, 3:37 PM
If your strong hand has failed, how are you got to use it to grip the slide and pull it back? It would be faster to hook the rear sight on your belt/pocket and pull it back that way.

As an aside, everyone should give thought to what the will do if they lose the use of their strong hand in a fight. How are you going to reload? Clear a malfunction? These are not difficult things to do with only your support hand, but you really want to know how to do them before your life depends upon it.

Yeah Gryff, you're pretty much right. I guess what I meant to say was that its ambidextrous in the sense that if you have to transition to shooting with your weak hand, your muscle memory would still apply.

Bob Hostetter
07-26-2010, 5:41 PM
I have actually practiced and timed doing it both ways, and it is measurably faster to use the slide release (averaging about a full second faster). I can measure the difference in both IDPA and USPSA competition and that can mean the difference between winning and not....

Dreaded Claymore
07-27-2010, 3:17 PM
So, is there anything wrong with using the slide stop lever to release the slide? Am I doing it wrong?

Gryff
07-27-2010, 3:25 PM
So, is there anything wrong with using the slide stop lever to release the slide?

Your head will blow up. Same thing will happen if you call a magazine a "clip."

Or it might not. Try it and find out. If your head doesn't blow up (it will happen immediately if it is going to happen at all), then it will be safe to use that technique.

HkFan416
07-27-2010, 4:22 PM
Your head will blow up. Same thing will happen if you call a magazine a "clip."

Or it might not. Try it and find out. If your head doesn't blow up (it will happen immediately if it is going to happen at all), then it will be safe to use that technique.

I thought it was the gun blowing up?

Soldier415
07-27-2010, 4:30 PM
Incorrect. The proper method, for some people, is pulling back and letting go. For other people, it's using the release lever. What's most important is picking one, training like crazy with the technique, and then sticking to it.



So, is there anything wrong with using the slide stop lever to release the slide? Am I doing it wrong?

The reasons behind using the slingshot (pull side back and release) method I have are pretty simple.

I don't shoot IDPA or IPSC, and I always think in terms of defensive/combat shooting.

If you for whatever reason throw an empty mag in your gun during the heat of the moment, and you hit the slide stop to close the slide...it will close, and you will not know it is empty until you pull the trigger. Then, you think FTF and go to immediate action, then have to transition into a speed reload.

If you throw an empy mag in the gun and try to pull the slide back to release, it will not close and you know immediately it is an empty mag and can load a fresh one.

Second main reason is economy of movement. Reload, malfunction clearance are the same movement. The less you have to train your body to do, the better.

This is just my opinion, developed over the course of roughly 10 years of defensive shooting and training, and serving in combat.

It is A way, not THE way.

Gryff
07-27-2010, 4:41 PM
If you throw an empy mag in the gun and try to pull the slide back to release, it will not close and you know immediately it is an empty mag and can load a fresh one.

That is the best argument for slingshot that I've ever heard. Very interesting point.