PDA

View Full Version : It's Official: Factory-Glocks are not suitable for ammo-reloaders...


Rock_Islander
07-21-2010, 8:15 AM
So I was reloading a bunch of my .45 brass/ammo this past weekend... To shoot out of my two 1911's. And what I found when I inspected all of my brass was startling.

I looked at the backs of each of the brass casings/spent primers, and what type of dent was left on them. Glock-shot brass left a distinct "square" shaped dent from the striker it used, so I put all of the Glock-shot brass in a cup for further evaluation before I used any of them for reloading. All brass that had a circular "standard" firing pin dent were separated into another cup, in which those were most likely fired out of 1911's or guns other than Glocks.

When I put the Glock-shot brass up to a good light at my workbench, I saw bulges in one side on almost of ALL of those brass casings. I'm under the assumption that they were once fired brass, from factory new ammo. I say so because I picked them up from a local indoor range where a lot of people rent glocks, buy new ammo, shoot and just go home (thus leaving the brass there).

The brass that was shot out of non-Glock .45's were structurally the same to the naked eye. Meaning no bulges or anything out of the ordinary that would alarm me as to my personal safety when I decided to reload and use them for shooting.

I still have the cupfull of the Glock-shot brass, which I will inspect further to see if I can resize and use at a later time for "normal" or slightly under normal power loads.

Regardless, I think Glocks are great weapons. They have tremendous accuracy, reliability, low-bore axis, and of course the advantages of the double-stack capacity. BUT I still believe 1911s are better for my purposes and just better in general, especially in regards to serious reloaders/serious shooters that want to produce their own ultra-accurate recipes at their reloading press, at a price much cheaper than any factory ammo out there.

All of my brass shot from my pistols (1911s) do not produce bulges. The chamber is supported FULLY, and the barrel has been throated just right from the factory that they will eat ANY (round nose, WC, Hollows) ammo I feed them. They are just as reliable as any Glocks that I have run next to (my friends, etc.)... I would hate to see the day where someone with a Glock reloads a few times from one piece of brass, and that bulging effect causes a real catastrophic failure when he shoots his weapon. KABOOM is what I mean. The polymer frame offers no protection against such failure. At least an all steel frame and slide might crack slightly, or hairline fracture, but not explode in your hands.

Just an observation for those out there, if you guys would like I can post up close-up shots (pictures) of what the brass looks like. It's definitely not a confidence-building sight to see. I was seriously considering a Glock as my next pistol, as my FIRST polymer pistol, but not anymore. I reload all of my .45 because it's cheaper and more accurate, and fun to create special recipes/loads of varying power and/or accuracy. I guess I'll just save my cash and put the extra money down on a Smith and Wesson M&P .45 for my first "Tupperware" handgun.

Thanks for reading the long post,

R.I.

TakeFive
07-21-2010, 8:33 AM
Thanks for the info. I would like to see pictures if it's not too much trouble.

longhairchris
07-21-2010, 8:39 AM
I have no such problems with my Glock 19. No bulging, the brass seems to reload just fine too. I paid special attention to my brass, because of all the "Glocks are hard on brass" statements. Of course, this is for 9mm and is an observation of my experience only.

It could be that the specific gun that your brass came out of was a worn out rental gun. It may be a good idea to pass this info on to the range so they can address the issue before something bad happens.

J-cat
07-21-2010, 8:44 AM
When I put the Glock-shot brass up to a good light at my workbench, I saw bulges in one side on almost of ALL of those brass casings. I'm under the assumption that they were once fired brass, from factory new ammo. I say so because I picked them up from a local indoor range where a lot of people rent glocks, buy new ammo, shoot and just go home (thus leaving the brass there).



You drew an incorrect conclusion from your observations. The Glock chamber is larger than a 1911 chamber. The case shows more expansion, but the case is perfectly reloadable just as 308 brass fired in 7.62 chambers is just as reloadable as 308 brass fired in 308 chambers.

nn3453
07-21-2010, 8:50 AM
You drew an incorrect conclusion from your observations. The Glock chamber is larger than a 1911 chamber. The case shows more expansion, but the case is perfectly reloadable just as 308 brass fired in 7.62 chambers is just as reloadable as 308 brass fired in 308 chambers.

Yep. I have reloaded Glock brass thousands of times without issues.

Another, "hey I need to justify why I like 1911s better than all other guns, my religion is the best one" thread. If you like your 1911, more power to you. I like 1911s and Glocks. When shooting "seriously"/competitively, I prefer the latter. I also like potato chips AND fries, Camaros AND BMWs, etc.

sargenv
07-21-2010, 8:55 AM
There are push through sizers available for 40 S&W that was fired through Glocks, likely there are the same push through sizers available for 9mm and 45 acp. There are also Roll sizers out there in limited numbers for just this sort of "guppy'ed" brass that is fired in an unsupported chamber such as the Glock. I have heard that XD's in 45 acp have done the same thing.

l_Z_l
07-21-2010, 8:57 AM
Post up some pics of what u have. I know glocks can leave marks on the casings but not sure bout the bulge u are talking about. USPs are fine polymer guns as well.

J-cat
07-21-2010, 9:01 AM
No need for a push through sized for this caliber. Any standard 45 ACP die will iron out a Glock bulge.

Fishslayer
07-21-2010, 9:12 AM
I use range pickups almost exclusively so I'm sure I've loaded up many Glock fired cases.

I also load on a turret so I handle every piece of brass more than once & haven't noticed anything unusual.

The .45ACP is a low pressure round so I personally am not concerned. If Glock fired .45 brass was a problem I'm sure we would have heard of a rash of .45 kabooms by now.

mif_slim
07-21-2010, 9:15 AM
I think glocks are usually fine unless its .40sw. I had a trade for 500 glock fired brass in 40sw and they all had a small bulge...but reloaded perfectly fine.

CSACANNONEER
07-21-2010, 9:20 AM
It's "official"??? Sorry, I have used 10s of 1000s of Glock fired, range pick up .45acp brass without any problems. I used to work at an indoor range so, I had plenty of Glocked brass at my disposal. I would cast and load about 5K bullets at a time and run them through my Kimbers without any issues.

J-cat
07-21-2010, 9:23 AM
There's the Glock Bulge and there's the Glock bulge. The former is a normal expanded case. The latter is an indent made by the feed ramp and is a sign of imminent case failure. People sometimes don't know how to tell one from the other.

Connor P Price
07-21-2010, 9:28 AM
Size it, load it, and shoot it again.

IMC87
07-21-2010, 9:36 AM
no problems with my 'glocked brass'. In .40 cal too. Had a few sizing issues with my standard dillon resizing die (didn't re size the bulge far enough down, but bought a EGW resizing die which sizes lower and is meant for 'glocked brass') Since then, 99.9% reload success rate

Turo
07-21-2010, 9:37 AM
So, Rock_Islander, let me get this straight. Because you personally see a difference between a Glock fired case and a 1911 fired case, it "officially" means that Glock fired cases are not suitable to be reloaded? That, my friend, is not "official," it's merely one person's opinion based on absolutely nothing but stories and lore spread by people that dislike one brand of pistol. You don't even have offer any data in your claim.

Using the same justification, I could say that all the cases that I pick up with a scratch and dent caused by some gun's extractor (let's say that it was it was .223 cases fired by those AR-15s) are completely useless to any and all reloaders. Because of a visible variant (not one that's structurally compromising, mind you) ALL AR-15 brass is useless to reloaders, It's Official! I said it!

aermotor
07-21-2010, 10:18 AM
What type of brass is this?

BamBam-31
07-21-2010, 10:27 AM
IT'S OFFICIAL: Thread title needs to be changed. ;)

CSACANNONEER
07-21-2010, 10:37 AM
Oh yea, feel free to send me all your Glocked .45acp brass. I will make sure to dispose of it for you.

Ninja45
07-21-2010, 10:56 AM
+1 for reloading thousands of .45 ACPs (and 9mm, and 40 S&W) shot thru Glocks. Not a kaboom yet in any of my pistols (Glocks or otherwise). Like anything else, know what you're doing and watch for double charges or squibs.

I equally love the 1911's and Glocks, by the way.

halo6941
07-21-2010, 11:09 AM
I saw bulges in one side on almost of ALL of those brass casings

this happened to me when I was shooting a glock 9mm that my friend rented from the range. It was all fine then bam the slide gets stuck going forward about the width of a penney. When I went to get the range master he already knew the problem he got a screw driver and pride it open and sure enough the round had a big split and buldge.

Gryff
07-21-2010, 11:43 AM
BUT I still believe 1911s are...just better in general

I'd definitely argue that one. I would never trust my life to a gun that I have to hold "just right" to be able to pull the trigger. I violently dislike the 1911 grip safety and the complete ergonomic fail of having to ride the safety.

They are just as reliable as any Glocks that I have run

Yours may be. The majority of modern 1911s are not.

I would hate to see the day where someone with a Glock reloads a few times from one piece of brass, and that bulging effect causes a real catastrophic failure when he shoots his weapon. KABOOM is what I mean. The polymer frame offers no protection against such failure. At least an all steel frame and slide might crack slightly, or hairline fracture, but not explode in your hands.

Not going to happen. You'll lose the brass long before it fails due to Glock bulge. Additionally, there are reloading dies that will specifically address the bulge issue and re-size accordingly.

Also, Glocks are tough guns, even when they kaboom. I had a G17 KB in my daughter's hands two years ago. No barrel/slide damage, but it did split the frame. All it did was sting her hands a fair amount. No fingers lost, no half a hand, no facial disfigurement. You don't have to be afraid.

Notblake
07-21-2010, 11:53 AM
I don't like reloading for glocks because of the polygonal rifling not the brass. You can re-size the buldge away no problem, but the rifling gets fouled up to quickly for my liking......

YMMV (with cost of supplies these days reloading 9mm with anything other than cast lead almost seems like a waste of money/time)

bn91205
07-21-2010, 11:53 AM
I had a G17 KB in my daughter's hands two years ago. No barrel/slide damage, but it did split the frame. All it did was sting her hands a fair amount. No fingers lost, no half a hand, no facial disfigurement. You don't have to be afraid.

:eek:

Oldnoob
07-21-2010, 12:11 PM
Must be great for you to release "Official" statement regarding the quality of Glock.

:King:


:rolleyes:

Rock_Islander
07-21-2010, 1:01 PM
HAHA OKAY, my apologies gentlemen. I just created a title without trying to persecute all Glocks and all Glock owners. I didn't think it'd stir up such a hornets nest so my badness everyone.

I'm just saying, the bulge at the "excessively throated" (as Glock refers to it) area produces a bulge because of less than adequate support there. The round goes *bang* pressure is released, the bullet leaves the weapon's bore, and that unsupported area of brass bulges because there is no solid metal there to ensure all of the blast releases out of the case mouth. Some of that "blast effect" bends, warps, "BULGES" the brass! Plain and simple. Yes it can be resized, and reloaded, but all I'm saying is that bulge is a stressed point for the metal involved. It's like blowing air into a balloon and watching which part stretches the most causing the most sensitive area for it to pop at.

I know there are after market barrels that fix this problem, hence why I've stated that "Factory-Glocks" aren't suitable for serious reloading. Okay I should have not put "It's Official" or whatever, I should have put "Its My Opinion" or something maybe more suitable now that I think about it... But all I'm saying is that it's NOT A GOOD SIGN, it may re-size and reload fine, but it's DEFINITELY NOT IDEAL to see bulging in one small particular area, from something that contains explosive charge and is used multiple times to detonate explosive charge.

Flouncer
07-21-2010, 4:38 PM
:useless:

Sorry, had to say it.

Voo
07-21-2010, 6:07 PM
HAHA OKAY, my apologies gentlemen. I just created a title without trying to persecute all Glocks and all Glock owners. I didn't think it'd stir up such a hornets nest so my badness everyone.

I'm just saying, the bulge at the "excessively throated" (as Glock refers to it) area produces a bulge because of less than adequate support there. The round goes *bang* pressure is released, the bullet leaves the weapon's bore, and that unsupported area of brass bulges because there is no solid metal there to ensure all of the blast releases out of the case mouth. Some of that "blast effect" bends, warps, "BULGES" the brass! Plain and simple. Yes it can be resized, and reloaded, but all I'm saying is that bulge is a stressed point for the metal involved. It's like blowing air into a balloon and watching which part stretches the most causing the most sensitive area for it to pop at.

I know there are after market barrels that fix this problem, hence why I've stated that "Factory-Glocks" aren't suitable for serious reloading. Okay I should have not put "It's Official" or whatever, I should have put "Its My Opinion" or something maybe more suitable now that I think about it... But all I'm saying is that it's NOT A GOOD SIGN, it may re-size and reload fine, but it's DEFINITELY NOT IDEAL to see bulging in one small particular area, from something that contains explosive charge and is used multiple times to detonate explosive charge.

It's Official, this thread is a FAIL. :rolleyes:

You dont' need to apologize for anything. You came across exactly how you wanted to, "sensational". But the thing you overlooked was that what you wrote lacked merit and/or substance. You act like you're the first to disocver the New World or something. Ehh.. People who reload seriously/carefully have know about this for A LONG TIME now.. Hmm, a plethora of people coming on telling you it's not an issue, could it be they've also known about it all this time- YOU THINK?? I wouldnt be surprised if your next post was about how they just discovered that cigarettes were bad for you..

You spread FUD about any particular design, you're not just throwing rocks at a hornet's nest, you're more like the guy that's errorneously throwing rocks off a bridge at passing cars. Do your research a bit more and maybe you'll get closer to the truth next time..

CSACANNONEER
07-21-2010, 6:12 PM
BTW, the brass expands BEFORE the bullet leaves the barrel. Once the bullet leaves the barrel, there is no reason for the brass to expand. Other than that, you have a very basic idea of why the brass gets this bulge. While it may not be ideal for you, personally, I've NEVER seen or had a problem with it. It's more "ideal" to me than picking up crushed or dented brass and straightening it out.

EWILKE
07-21-2010, 9:01 PM
Yeah I hear this all the time I have been reloading ONLY brass fired from a glock 21 for over 10 years. I don't know how many are the originals but they always reload just fine. If they are not than your sizing die is not doing the job or it is adjusted wrong. some of my brass must have 20 reloads on them.you don't need your target loads to shoot at 1000 fps. mild loads make everything last longer. if you need to shoot hot stuff stick with new ammo.

Gio
07-21-2010, 9:06 PM
http://pix.motivatedphotos.com/2009/7/22/633838673083134865-FACEPALM.jpg

J-cat
07-21-2010, 9:19 PM
Is this the kind of bulge you're seeing?

http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a35/918v/Glock_Bulge.jpg?t=1279772302

Connor P Price
07-21-2010, 10:48 PM
^Thats a pretty good one, more pronounced than I see in my loads. I'd still reload it though.

limitdown
07-21-2010, 11:17 PM
I've never seen any bulge like that from my Glock 21, 17, Sig 229, HK P30 or Springfield 1911 operator.
Something is wrong with that one specific specimen, perhaps a damaged chamber

Btw...my religion is better than yours....!

TKM
07-21-2010, 11:41 PM
I'd probably edit heavily and pretend that I knew exactly what I was talking about all along.








Not really. Good luck.




Purely idle curiosity at this point. Were Glocks invented before you came along?

SLYoteBoy
07-21-2010, 11:47 PM
My dad's XD leaves rectangle shaped primer strikes. Brass still looks the same though.

Code7inOaktown
07-21-2010, 11:52 PM
There's the Glock Bulge and there's the Glock bulge. The former is a normal expanded case. The latter is an indent made by the feed ramp and is a sign of imminent case failure. People sometimes don't know how to tell one from the other.

Yes, I would actually like to know the difference. I have two brother-in-laws who are LE and retired LE. I go shooting with them and on one, the Glock 40 brass looks OK, but has the prime swipe. On the other there is a significant bulge that made me think, man something is wrong this Glock. My own Glock 40 which I don't often shoot (not a particular fan of it, sorry) seems OK on brass.

So how can you tell?

Rock_Islander
07-22-2010, 7:57 AM
Is this the kind of bulge you're seeing?

http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a35/918v/Glock_Bulge.jpg?t=1279772302

J-Cat I've got a couple like that. Most are not AS pronounced.

Just to repeat to everyone, let me change "ITS OFFICIAL" to "ITS MY OPINION" that it can lead to unsafe events. Bulging is a stress point, and brass is not infinitely elastic.

I know I'm gonna get a lot of flack from all of you Glock owners and Glock fanatics, but hey, I said they're great guns, I really do believe they are. I just said that for serious reloaders, I don't think they're suitable.

Of course there's probably a lot of you out there that think different, some of you factory-ammo shooters, some of you actual reloaders. I've read through the "ABC's of Reloading" of course just a crash course starter's manual on reloading... But bulging is not a good sign. I know that published literature on "safe" guidelines and what happens in real life may be two different things. All I'm saying is that if all roads lead to Rome, and you're on those roads, you're gonna' get there. If you keep reloading bulged/stressed brass, one day, if that bulge keeps pushing at that same area as it has in the past... NOT GOOD. That statement is not facepalm, the possible event that happens next WILL be. lol.

Corbin Dallas
07-22-2010, 8:05 AM
So I was reloading a bunch of my .45 brass/ammo this past weekend... To shoot out of my two 1911's. And what I found when I inspected all of my brass was startling.

I looked at the backs of each of the brass casings/spent primers, and what type of dent was left on them. Glock-shot brass left a distinct "square" shaped dent from the striker it used, so I put all of the Glock-shot brass in a cup for further evaluation before I used any of them for reloading. All brass that had a circular "standard" firing pin dent were separated into another cup, in which those were most likely fired out of 1911's or guns other than Glocks.

When I put the Glock-shot brass up to a good light at my workbench, I saw bulges in one side on almost of ALL of those brass casings. I'm under the assumption that they were once fired brass, from factory new ammo. I say so because I picked them up from a local indoor range where a lot of people rent glocks, buy new ammo, shoot and just go home (thus leaving the brass there).

The brass that was shot out of non-Glock .45's were structurally the same to the naked eye. Meaning no bulges or anything out of the ordinary that would alarm me as to my personal safety when I decided to reload and use them for shooting.

I still have the cupfull of the Glock-shot brass, which I will inspect further to see if I can resize and use at a later time for "normal" or slightly under normal power loads.

Regardless, I think Glocks are great weapons. They have tremendous accuracy, reliability, low-bore axis, and of course the advantages of the double-stack capacity. BUT I still believe 1911s are better for my purposes and just better in general, especially in regards to serious reloaders/serious shooters that want to produce their own ultra-accurate recipes at their reloading press, at a price much cheaper than any factory ammo out there.

All of my brass shot from my pistols (1911s) do not produce bulges. The chamber is supported FULLY, and the barrel has been throated just right from the factory that they will eat ANY (round nose, WC, Hollows) ammo I feed them. They are just as reliable as any Glocks that I have run next to (my friends, etc.)... I would hate to see the day where someone with a Glock reloads a few times from one piece of brass, and that bulging effect causes a real catastrophic failure when he shoots his weapon. KABOOM is what I mean. The polymer frame offers no protection against such failure. At least an all steel frame and slide might crack slightly, or hairline fracture, but not explode in your hands.

Just an observation for those out there, if you guys would like I can post up close-up shots (pictures) of what the brass looks like. It's definitely not a confidence-building sight to see. I was seriously considering a Glock as my next pistol, as my FIRST polymer pistol, but not anymore. I reload all of my .45 because it's cheaper and more accurate, and fun to create special recipes/loads of varying power and/or accuracy. I guess I'll just save my cash and put the extra money down on a Smith and Wesson M&P .45 for my first "Tupperware" handgun.

Thanks for reading the long post,

R.I.


I'll pay you the shipping charges and you can send me all your glock brass for proper disposal.

:D

I saw your picture and that looks very odd to me. My G21 does not buldge that much at all. Could you take a picture from the top down looking from the headstamp?


To show you how much I trust my tactical tupperware, I shoot these out of my factory G21SF:

230g Bear Creek RN with 5.5g of W231, COL of 1.125, WolfSP. Chrono @ 750fps on average.

I've only seen a couple of cracked mouths after firing. (BTW, mouths crack all the time and is not dangerous)

http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/qq324/AdamJGreenberg/Weapons/IMG_1523.jpg

J-cat
07-22-2010, 8:24 AM
J-Cat I've got a couple like that. Most are not AS pronounced.


When looking at range brass, you have to understand 1. Not all Glocks are perfect 2. Most people don't know what the hell they are doing are not in a position to observe and diagnose potential safety issues 3. What appears as factory, once fired brass, may be an unsafe handload using new brass.

Glocked brass that does not show the feedramp indent is perfectly safe to reload. If you have a Glock, your brass may not last as long as that fired in a tight 1911, but you'll prolly lose the case in the dirt before it fails.

BamBam-31
07-22-2010, 9:57 AM
J-Cat I've got a couple like that. Most are not AS pronounced.

Just to repeat to everyone, let me change "ITS OFFICIAL" to "ITS MY OPINION" that it can lead to unsafe events. Bulging is a stress point, and brass is not infinitely elastic.

I know I'm gonna get a lot of flack from all of you Glock owners and Glock fanatics, but hey, I said they're great guns, I really do believe they are. I just said that for serious reloaders, I don't think they're suitable.

Of course there's probably a lot of you out there that think different, some of you factory-ammo shooters, some of you actual reloaders. I've read through the "ABC's of Reloading" of course just a crash course starter's manual on reloading... But bulging is not a good sign. I know that published literature on "safe" guidelines and what happens in real life may be two different things. All I'm saying is that if all roads lead to Rome, and you're on those roads, you're gonna' get there. If you keep reloading bulged/stressed brass, one day, if that bulge keeps pushing at that same area as it has in the past... NOT GOOD. That statement is not facepalm, the possible event that happens next WILL be. lol.

FYI, it is possible to edit the title of your thread yourself. That way, the "Glock fanatics" and "non-serious" reloaders will stop questioning your conclusions and declarations. Heaven forbid they actually have experience to the contrary (which, taken collectively, translates to quite a body of work from which more accurate conclusions can be drawn). Keep in mind, some of us have been reloading for our Glocks for quite some time, and with great results, too. Hence the raised eyebrows to the Chicken Little stuff. ;)

Code7inOaktown
07-22-2010, 7:16 PM
J-Cat I've got a couple like that. Most are not AS pronounced.

Just to repeat to everyone, let me change "ITS OFFICIAL" to "ITS MY OPINION" that it can lead to unsafe events. Bulging is a stress point, and brass is not infinitely elastic.

I know I'm gonna get a lot of flack from all of you Glock owners and Glock fanatics, but hey, I said they're great guns, I really do believe they are. I just said that for serious reloaders, I don't think they're suitable.

Of course there's probably a lot of you out there that think different, some of you factory-ammo shooters, some of you actual reloaders. I've read through the "ABC's of Reloading" of course just a crash course starter's manual on reloading... But bulging is not a good sign. I know that published literature on "safe" guidelines and what happens in real life may be two different things. All I'm saying is that if all roads lead to Rome, and you're on those roads, you're gonna' get there. If you keep reloading bulged/stressed brass, one day, if that bulge keeps pushing at that same area as it has in the past... NOT GOOD. That statement is not facepalm, the possible event that happens next WILL be. lol.

Hmmm. That's the kind of bulge I'm seeing from my brother-in-law's issue G23. My G22 does not do that nor my other brother-in-law's G23 or G26. Do the Glock experts know if that's a sign that the it's going to go Ka Boom?

Rock_Islander
07-23-2010, 1:00 PM
^ what he said...

Anyone have any idea?

hill billy
07-23-2010, 1:53 PM
There are push through sizers available for 40 S&W that was fired through Glocks, likely there are the same push through sizers available for 9mm and 45 acp.
FYI, there is not currently a push through sizer except the Lee, mostly due to the fact that the 9mm is a tapered case.

J-Cat I've got a couple like that. Most are not AS pronounced.
I'd really like to see pics of a .45 case shot out of a Glock that was that bad. I think that's a .40 case in the picture.


I really do believe they are. I just said that for serious reloaders, I don't think they're suitable.
Of course there's probably a lot of you out there that think different, some of you factory-ammo shooters, some of you actual reloaders. I've read through the "ABC's of Reloading" of course just a crash course starter's manual on reloading...
If I understand this, you are saying you recently started reloading. You realize there are some people in this thread who have loaded more .45 THIS WEEK, than you will likely load THIS YEAR? You have formed an opinion on a faulty analysis. Sometimes choosing the right road means listening to those who might know more than you. Just a friendly bit of advice.;)

nitrofc
07-23-2010, 7:28 PM
FYI, there is not currently a push through sizer except the Lee, mostly due to the fact that the 9mm is a tapered case.

I'd really like to see pics of a .45 case shot out of a Glock that was that bad. I think that's a .40 case in the picture.


If I understand this, you are saying you recently started reloading. You realize there are some people in the this thread who have loaded more .45 THIS WEEK, than you will likely load THIS YEAR? You have formed an opinion on a faulty analysis. Sometimes choosing the right road means listening to those who might know more than you. Just a friendly bit of advice.;)

I have several Glock Gen. 3 .40's and I use the Lee dies. They work perfect.
I was amazed how well they push the brass back to spec.

hill billy
07-23-2010, 7:42 PM
I have several Glock Gen. 3 .40's and I use the Lee dies. They work perfect.
I was amazed how well they push the brass back to spec.

I use the Redding Gr-X die and it works pretty well, too. I was just referring to the sizers for .45 and 9

CSACANNONEER
07-23-2010, 8:02 PM
Hey Rock Islander,

I made MaxPowers an offer in this thread:
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=323781

I am more than willing to extend it to you as well. I am willing to do it if I can get someone from your camp to witness it. Come on, let's run 3 round of factory ammo once and then try reloading each piece of brass up to 100 times with every round being fired through my stock G21.

TMC
07-23-2010, 8:05 PM
All of my brass shot from my pistols (1911s) do not produce bulges. The chamber is supported FULLY, and the barrel has been throated just right from the factory that they will eat ANY (round nose, WC, Hollows) ammo I feed them.

If all your 45 1911's are Para's then maybe but if they are not your guns do not have fully supported chambers. Traditional 45 barrels without an entegeral feed ramp are not fully supported. Fully supported chamber and the ability to feed different bullet types are two different things.