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SCB5794
07-20-2010, 11:45 AM
so I'm writing this detective novel and in it one of the characters finds an old gun in his attic, they live in California. Now to keep everything realistic would he have to register it, or some other thing, not sure how to use as a plot device

Blood Ocean
07-20-2010, 11:47 AM
Shoot it. Unless it was left behind by the previous resident it's probably a family item and he can register i in his name for $19 with the DOJ. Keep the box.

gravedigger
07-20-2010, 11:57 AM
Tuck it away, and keep your mouth shut!

TMC
07-20-2010, 12:00 PM
Tuck it away, and keep your mouth shut!

+1 on that

POLICESTATE
07-20-2010, 12:09 PM
Tuck it away, and keep your mouth shut!

What gun? It was a CAP PISTOL! Right? Right??? :shifty:

Next time, you should say "so I'm writing this detective novel and in it one of the characters finds an old gun in his attic, they live in California. Now to keep everything realistic would he have to register it, or some other thing, not sure how to use as a plot device"

Got it? :rolleyes:

Decoligny
07-20-2010, 12:17 PM
Clean it, Oil it, Put it away with a reasonably large amount of ammunition.

JTROKS
07-20-2010, 12:33 PM
What if gun was used in a murder, or worst multiple murders?

usctrojan
07-20-2010, 1:23 PM
What if gun was used in a murder, or worst multiple murders?

Couple thoughts:
I wondered the same thing when I bought a C&R rifle... COOOL! :D
Good point file off the serial number! :rolleyes:

I only support the legal handling of your recently found snap gun that for some reason you thought was real. :eek:

M. D. Van Norman
07-20-2010, 4:16 PM
Realistically, most people have no idea what the laws are. The characters might fear that the gun is illegal, or they might think nothing of stuffing it into the sock drawer or selling it at their next garage sale.

What purpose does the gun serve in your plot?

winnre
07-20-2010, 5:19 PM
Is it a Luger with the initials AH on the stocks?

Saym14
07-20-2010, 7:33 PM
trade it for a gift card at the county gun collection event.

usctrojan
07-20-2010, 7:40 PM
trade it for a gift card at the county gun collection event.

:troll: :7:

;)

bjl333
07-20-2010, 8:14 PM
What purpose does the gun serve in your plot?

^ Question ^

GrinderCB
07-20-2010, 8:29 PM
so I'm writing this detective novel and in it one of the characters finds an old gun in his attic, they live in California. Now to keep everything realistic would he have to register it, or some other thing, not sure how to use as a plot device

I'm sorry, Your Honor, I have no recollection...

Cochise82
07-21-2010, 3:25 PM
I was wondering the same thing. You see my buddy is writing a novel as well and it has a very similar plot. The main character wants to legally become the owner of the gun but isn't sure if he could get busted if it was indeed ever used unlawfully.

tacticalcity
07-21-2010, 3:37 PM
What if gun was used in a murder, or worst multiple murders?

That would make for a great plot twist. You could take that in all kinds of directions.

As for what the character would do, it depends. It depends on how jaded he is. I know lots of gun owners, non-gun owners, and even police officers who would keep it and keep their mouth shut about it. The more jaded of them, including the police officers, could see the value of a firearm not registered to themselves. They are called "burners", "drop pieces" or "throw away guns". Definitely NOT saying this is a smart idea, or that I agree with that sentiment. I am just saying there are a lot of people out there that would do that. Definitely not legal.

Then there are the people who want to make sure they played by the rules. I am one of those people, mostly because having a gun related business makes me a pretty big target. I hold myself to a very high standard. One that has as many downsides as upsides. The smart move would be to take it to their local gun store and talk to the owner, who would look up the manufacturer date of the gun, ask if their is a family connection (grandpa or dad's gun and so forth) and follow the letter of the law. The idiots among us, and there are many, would call the police and odds are the police would give them miss guided incorrect information. People assume law enforcement knows gun laws. Most do not. I've seen countless examples of police officers taking advantage of civilians ignorance of gun laws and offer to "buy" the gun off the civilian at a deflated price because it was "illegal" for them to own it when in fact, it was perfectly legal for them to own the gun. We get posts like those on here all the time.

It is worth noting that a lot of gun store clerks are know it alls who get things completely bass akwards. So he could still get bad advise from the gun store clerk. If the gun is extremely valuable, they may try and take advantage of him and pull the "I'll take it off your hands for only $XXX.XX trick as well. But that is less common than seeing a police officer do it. It might sound like I am anti-law enforcement by that statement. Nothing could further from the truth. It is just that we've seen endless bad gun advise come from cops, and one or two shady tricks played on civilians in order to get their hands on a really cool gun.

All of the above could easily be incorporated into your story. You could take full advantage of the fact that most people, including law enforcement, are complete idiots when it comes to what to do with a found gun. You could highlight such an error if you wanted. Or you could highlight an intentional violation of he law, for some devious motive. All of which would be realistic and interesting.

JTROKS
07-21-2010, 3:48 PM
Good point file off the serial number!

The gun isn't tested to confirm criminal use by serial numbers, the numbers are just there to track origin/history and paper trail. I'm sure if the pistol was used in a murder and you happen to have it in your possession it all depends on proving when you acquired it. The registration isn't enough, since you would have to inform the court who sold it to you? For example, if the gun was made in the 1940s, but you were born in 1985, and the crime the gun was involved in was in 2005. And you're registering it now. Hmmmmm.... Can you prove where you were that tragic day in 2005 that will guarantee you're innocent? Is that gun really worth the risk?

j1133s
07-21-2010, 5:43 PM
so I'm writing this detective novel and in it one of the characters finds an old gun in his attic, they live in California. Now to keep everything realistic would he have to register it, or some other thing, not sure how to use as a plot device

Ok, how about this...
Person finds gun, got all worried and stuff. Goes about very nervous and worried about gun was stolen, was used in crime/ killed people, etc. Nightmares, friends complications, etc. Goes to police, worried about being accused, etc. LEO can't find erial #, etc. thinks either too old for serial #. Person thinks of getting lots of $$$$ for old gun.


Finally, turns out to be a good non-working replica at antique roadshow that pays for a nice dinner. :)

Masterdebater
07-21-2010, 9:34 PM
tell the gun clerk the serial number and say ur friend found this gun and wants to check the history on it. what kind of gun is it he finds?

pyromensch
07-21-2010, 9:39 PM
Tuck it away, and keep your mouth shut!

+1000 on that, if it is old enough, there is not telling where or how they came into posession of it. but then again, it might have been used to get rid of jimmy hoffa. luckily they haven't found him....yet

pyromensch
07-21-2010, 9:40 PM
Clean it, Oil it, Put it away with a reasonably large amount of ammunition.

what, of 32 S&W? or 38-40

pyromensch
07-21-2010, 9:42 PM
Is it a Luger with the initials AH on the stocks?

no they are on the bullets