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bearstatearmory.com
07-18-2010, 11:18 AM
I live in Corona, CA and am getting into hunting (haven't gone yet because I broke my leg) but had a few questions about "after the kill." So once you kill an animal (let's say a pig) what do you do after that? Depending on where you hunt (let's say public areas) how do you get a 200# pig back to the truck, then where do you take it to get the meat processed and made into steaks, roasts, etc...? Are you allowed to take a Yamaha Rhino (if you have one) and throw it in there to get back to your truck? Any pictures would be cool too, i have looked on youtube as well as a few different other forums but couldn't find anything. Thank for your help.

ScottB
07-18-2010, 12:08 PM
Butcher it on the spot and just pack out the backstraps, tenderloins and leg quarters. Neck meat, ribs, etc are up to you. Sometimes with large animals like elk or big hogs, it means multiple trips. Make sure you have a couple good knives, a small saw and a sharpener. plus some game bags, a pack or fram you can strap all this to and whatever other gear necessary to get it all rigged up. Once you get back to your truck, or wherever, you can deal with it as you please. Lots of guys do it themselves. I usually have a skilled friend help or take it somewhere. Theres a few good processors around. Bree's Meats in Garden Grove is good. Maybe there's one closer. Just keep the meat as cool and dry as you can until you get it cut and wrapped.

Use of a quad, utv, etc depends on the rules governing motorized vehicles on the land you are hunting BLM rules are different than NF and private landoweners will have their own rules. You may be able drive up to the kill or maybe just be able to get closer and minimize your hiking.

Don't of any tutorials, but I have seen them one the net. For a first hunt, I recommend going with a guide or someone who is experienced and going to school on them (that means volunteering to do the dirty work under their direction). Be the Glasshoppah

Fjold
07-18-2010, 12:32 PM
Bone it out on site and pack it out in cheesecloth bags. Put it in a cooler and place unopened bags of ice on top.

Wink
07-19-2010, 8:45 AM
Outdoor Edge has a decent game processing video.http://outdooredge.com

lewdogg21
07-19-2010, 8:57 AM
Bone it out on site and pack it out in cheesecloth bags. Put it in a cooler and place unopened bags of ice on top.

Do you cut and wrap it yourself or just take it to the butcher like that?

I sorta did this when I quartered and boned my elk to get it in the ice chest and I ended up with giant garbage bags full of meat. I'm pretty sure the butcher would know where the various parts are from when he dumped them out on the table but in the back of my mind I wondered.

bearstatearmory.com
07-19-2010, 9:06 AM
Outdoor Edge has a decent game processing video.http://outdooredge.com

Thanks for the link wink!

taperxz
07-19-2010, 2:59 PM
Bone it out on site and pack it out in cheesecloth bags. Put it in a cooler and place unopened bags of ice on top.

Do not do this!! Put the ice at the bottom of the ice chest and if possible make your own ice in two liter coke bottles. If i have to, i put the ice at the bottom and then cover it with a plastic bag to insure the meat does not come in contact with the melting ice. You do not want water on your meat. It will spoil the meat. Water and dirt are not your friends when it comes to meat.

spectr17
07-19-2010, 6:39 PM
If you can't afford the cheesecloth meat bags use pillow cases or military surplus laundry bags or mattress cover to cover your meat or hanging game. Just don't let the mrs. catch you stripping the beds.

ScottB
07-19-2010, 7:27 PM
Pillow cases are great. Canvas game bags are da bomb. Just remember whatever you do, keep it clean, cool and dry

reggie 00
07-19-2010, 7:48 PM
tagging for future reference.

elevated
07-19-2010, 8:04 PM
pretty much one of those things that you just gotta do for yourself with some guidance of course.

bigboarstopper
07-19-2010, 9:35 PM
Never use plastic bags. Plastic bags will hold the heat and moisture in and the meat will spoil much faster.

DirtyDave
07-20-2010, 10:52 AM
I went to the good will and picked up a couple pillow cases for like $0.50 each.
After you get it home, since you are in Corona, Take it to Hottingers Family Meats in Chino 909-628-2568

lewdogg21
07-20-2010, 6:48 PM
Never use plastic bags. Plastic bags will hold the heat and moisture in and the meat will spoil much faster.

Correct. I used plastic since my elk had hung for 3 days with freezing temps at night and with 12 hour drive home in 90* heat I had to ensure my meat wouldn't get wet.

r3dn3ck
07-22-2010, 2:17 PM
common game bags available at Big 5 are what I use. They're a heavy cotton gauze bag. Grab a couple. I normally gut, hang and bleed the critter immediately; cut all the meat off and wrap it up in the game bags. Drop some butcher paper over some ice bags and set the meat wraps on top of that. Go home.

Rob454
07-22-2010, 6:09 PM
I just butcher my game where I shot it or drag it to a spot where I can butcher it. I like to hang it for a little while and bleed it a little bit. If that is not practical at the spot I shot it at or nearby then i throw it on my tailgate and then take it back towards camp and butcher it about 1/2-1 mile away. I bury the guts and stuff. I have a bunch of cheese cloth bags. Depending on what it is and how much time I got i may go all out and do it all in the field or just quarter it ( I usually leave the head, hooves/forelegs, and pelt because i don't trophy hunt) If I quarter it I take it bring it home and throw it in a chest freezer and then I take it to the butcher the next day.
For transport I usually have a big cooler with ice blocks on the bottom. i found out that a cooler packed with block ice will not melt as quick as small cubed ice. I have a small clean piece of tarp that I use to keep the meat off the ice. I also have the cooler strapped to the bed of the truck and a piece of plastic tube where the drain hole for the cooler is located. the drain hose goes through a hole in the bed and drains on the ground.

The other guys are right you dont want water on the meat. its also a good idea to try and bleed the animal as much as you can. Also if you do shoot a animal in california you cannot have the animal visible. has to be covered up and tailgate up. I guess they dont want a bunch of little kids seeing bambys dead lifeless body rolling around the bed of a truck

CSACANNONEER
07-22-2010, 6:16 PM
I'm glad to see that you are thinking ahead. Please, be completely prepared to retrieve your kill before you take a shot at it. Sometimes this can mean passing up a trophy animal because it will take a day or better to get to it and pack it out. Again, kudos for thinking about being a responsible hunter before taking the field!

DirtyDave
07-22-2010, 7:21 PM
Also if you do shoot a animal in california you cannot have the animal visible. has to be covered up and tailgate up. I guess they dont want a bunch of little kids seeing bambys dead lifeless body rolling around the bed of a truck

I dont believe this is a true statement.
I searched the DFG regs and nowhere did it say anything about transporting an animal in plain view.
Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong

tuna quesadilla
07-22-2010, 7:46 PM
DirtyDave, you are correct. I'm studying for the CA hunter safety class right now. The DFG advises against having blood and gore visible to the general public, but you can still do it if you really want to.

Rob454
07-22-2010, 8:18 PM
I dont believe this is a true statement.
I searched the DFG regs and nowhere did it say anything about transporting an animal in plain view.
Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong

When i took my HS class thats what the instructors said. I no longer have a HS book or if I do I cant find it. I just remember them saying something about transporting in that fashion as I described then again that was a long time ago. it may be just fuzzy to me

wjc
07-22-2010, 8:37 PM
The Hunter Safety instructor in my class revealed that one should be as discrete as possible with the carcas so as not to offend the anti-hunting public.


There's a small section in the latest "Today's Hunter in California" HSC book (page 39) that states:

"Finally a sure way to ruin meat - as well as earn the disdain of non-hunters- is to tie the animal on the hood of roof of a car, where it's exposed to heat, exhaust, fumes, road salt, and airborne dust."

There's also some verbage on page 67 where it discusses being an ethical hunter:

Respect Non-Hunters
* Transport animals discretely - don't display them
* Keep firearms out of sight
* Refrain from taking graphic photograpsh of the kill and from vividly describing the kill while within earshot of non-hunters
* Maintain a presentable appearence while on the street - no bloody or dirty clothing

Hunter
07-22-2010, 8:49 PM
Butcher it on the spot and just pack out the backstraps, tenderloins and leg quarters. Neck meat, ribs, etc are up to you. ......

Careful with what meat you leave behind on the carcass. Fish and game code prohibits wanton waste of game animals and fish. Leaving the neck meat and rib meat behind is a clear violation of the law. Pack it out and dispose of it later if you don't use it.

4304. No person shall at any time capture or destroy any deer and
detach or remove from the carcass only the head, hide, antlers, or
horns; nor shall any person at any time leave through carelessness or
neglect any game mammal or game bird which is in his possession, or
any portion of the flesh thereof usually eaten by humans, to go
needlessly to waste.

bearstatearmory.com
07-22-2010, 9:03 PM
At this point I'm looking to hunt hogs and eat it. I am digging a pit in my backyard that is 8'x4'x4' that I am going to put the pig in and cook it "Somoan Style" in the ground and have a bunch of people over. If I kill it, I'm eating it.

olhunter
07-23-2010, 6:18 AM
At this point I'm looking to hunt hogs and eat it. I am digging a pit in my backyard that is 8'x4'x4' that I am going to put the pig in and cook it "Somoan Style" in the ground and have a bunch of people over. If I kill it, I'm eating it.

If you're hunting hogs on public land, you might as well just fill that hole with water and go swimming.

chris
07-23-2010, 7:40 AM
If you can't afford the cheesecloth meat bags use pillow cases or military surplus laundry bags or mattress cover to cover your meat or hanging game. Just don't let the mrs. catch you stripping the beds.

I take it you have experience in this area? :D

lewdogg21
07-23-2010, 7:52 AM
If you're hunting hogs on public land, you might as well just fill that hole with water and go swimming.

LOL


As far as being discreet. I drove back from NE Oregon with my Elk Rack on top of everything in the bed of my truck as a badge of my accomplishment (plus I didn't want it to be damaged if something slid over it). I pulled into Alturas to get gas and as I was turning left onto the main drag there was another truck also turning left from the other side of the street and he honked and gave me a big thumbs up. As that truck pulled out I saw the biggest 7x7 rack I've ever seen. I stopped right there and he stopped and I asked where he got it.

It was like Justin Bieber vs. The Rock.

But I still felt like a Rock Star.

PatriotnMore
07-23-2010, 7:54 AM
I live in Corona, CA and am getting into hunting (haven't gone yet because I broke my leg) but had a few questions about "after the kill." So once you kill an animal (let's say a pig) what do you do after that? Depending on where you hunt (let's say public areas) how do you get a 200# pig back to the truck, then where do you take it to get the meat processed and made into steaks, roasts, etc...? Are you allowed to take a Yamaha Rhino (if you have one) and throw it in there to get back to your truck? Any pictures would be cool too, i have looked on youtube as well as a few different other forums but couldn't find anything. Thank for your help.

There was/is a small butcher shop in down town Corona, he let me hang my Bear in his walk in, and then processed the meat for me. I had him make a bunch of Sausage, with 50% pork added, along with the Steaks, and roasts. He was very reasonable, but I don't live there any longer, and I am not sure he is still in business.

ScottB
07-23-2010, 8:46 AM
Careful with what meat you leave behind on the carcass. Fish and game code prohibits wanton waste of game animals and fish. Leaving the neck meat and rib meat behind is a clear violation of the law. Pack it out and dispose of it later if you don't use it.

I dispute that is a violation of the law, clear or otherwise. What I described does not even begin to approach the "wanton waste" standard. Not even close. That statute is intended to prohibit "high grading" which most people understand as taking only the backstraps, tenderloins and maybe the hams. Have you ever butchered a large animal several miles from your vehicle, often late in the day? And then having to make 2 or more trips in the dark to get it out?

Common sense says take everything of value and leave everything else. Carrying out useless meat trimmings only to dispose of it later is a waste of time and effort. I personally try to recover any significant amount of meat on the neck, but sometimes its sparse. Moreover, by packing out the entire leg quarters, I probably recover more meat than if i boned it all out on the spot. Packing out ribs is a waste of effort. I listed about 90%+ of the useable meat on an elk that way more than meets the standard. The way you are apparently reading that statute would require you to pack out every little streak along with the liver, heart and pancreas among other parts. Some do if they personally like that stuff, most folks don't and I have never heard anyone called wrong, let alone cited for leaving it with the gut pile

spectr17
07-23-2010, 1:44 PM
I dont believe this is a true statement.
I searched the DFG regs and nowhere did it say anything about transporting an animal in plain view.
Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong

There is no DFG reg about covering your game when transporting. Used to be everyone enjoyed seeing who got a deer and giving the thumbs up on the highway to successful hunters.

Now we're asked to drive tail gate up and hide our game. We "harvest" now instead of "kill". This all from the PC granola eaters who think meat comes shrink wrapped from the magic meat market. :confused:

Now the same crowd freaks out when we butcher the deer and bear in our garage with the door open. Screw em I say. We all try and bend to make our sport less shocking to the gappers but at some point they need a wake up call.

Super Spy
07-23-2010, 1:44 PM
I was looking forward to driving home with Bambi's Pappy strapped to the roof :D

<just kidding, but the mental image IS amusing>

spectr17
07-23-2010, 1:56 PM
Careful with what meat you leave behind on the carcass. Fish and game code prohibits wanton waste of game animals and fish. Leaving the neck meat and rib meat behind is a clear violation of the law. Pack it out and dispose of it later if you don't use it.

Some food for thought. Loren from our forum was cited for wanton waste of meat on a bear he killed way back in LPNF a few years back. He hiked out with the hide and skull of this big bear and went back for the meat, it was a long hike back to his honey hole. In the extreme heat of early bow season here in SoCal the meat was sour by the time he got it out late that night and DFG cited him for it. Bottom line, kill close to your truck in hot temps or you may have to deal with DFG if they happen upon you.

Another instance was a hunter I know got cited for wanton waste of meat for chucking a carcass in his trash can that had what DFG deemed as edible meat left on it. I can't remember if it was the trash guy or anti neighbor who turned him in. Anyhoo, the way to cure that is don't dump carcasses in your trash for some anti to find.

I've seen a lot of animals skinned and you could make an argument for almost 70% of them that edible meat was left on them. Many hunters don't know how to skin an animal or prepare the meat so they chop off what they know and toss the rest. I see a lot of neck meat tossed when it's great in the crock pot. Not many skin the face yet I know one german dude here in SoCal who uses everything except the hooves. The bottom line is it's a wobbler call for a warden, CYA applies here.

wjc
07-23-2010, 2:33 PM
There is no DFG reg about covering your game when transporting. Used to be everyone enjoyed seeing who got a deer and giving the thumbs up on the highway to successful hunters.

Now we're asked to drive tail gate up and hide our game. We "harvest" now instead of "kill". This all from the PC granola eaters who think meat comes shrink wrapped from the magic meat market. :confused:

Now the same crowd freaks out when we butcher the deer and bear in our garage with the door open. Screw em I say. We all try and bend to make our sport less shocking to the gappers but at some point they need a wake up call.

I couldn't agree more. I would like nothing better than to hear the shrill cries of the anti's as I lumber through town with a buck in the tail bed. My earlier post was just to inform what is in the Hunter Safety Book.

It still cracks me up when I ask people where they think their meat comes from. :D

bearstatearmory.com
07-23-2010, 2:35 PM
There is alot of really good info in this thread, I appreciate it. I now feel I have a fair understanding of this process.

Hunter
07-23-2010, 9:20 PM
I dispute that is a violation of the law, clear or otherwise. What I described does not even begin to approach the "wanton waste" standard. Not even close. That statute is intended to prohibit "high grading" which most people understand as taking only the backstraps, tenderloins and maybe the hams. Have you ever butchered a large animal several miles from your vehicle, often late in the day? And then having to make 2 or more trips in the dark to get it out?

LOL, yes I have done my fair share. The farthest I have had to pack a nice deer (with my backpack) was 8 miles with total of 7000ft of vertical climb (over 3 ridges). As for large animals, I have taken numerous 1000lb++ moose, some well over 2 miles from camp thru swamp and jack-knifed deadfall, not to mention large elk, nice caribous, and a few good size bears, ect. The only help have been from my hunting partner, if I had one on the trip, but many times it was just me. So yes, I am fully aware of the challenges of getting all athe meat out and trying to not waste it. I might add, that in some parts of AK, one is required by law to back out ALL MEAT on the bone, even the ribs. This law was put in place all due to the fact that people were deboning poorly and then they would end up loosing 2/3 of the boned meat from spoilage.

What I was responding to in your post was the comments about the neck and ribs. Yes, I have watched a CA warden (in the Trinity Alps) ticket a hunter for leaving the meat on the neck and shoulders behind. So while this law is open to interpretation by individual wardens, I just wanted to make the new hunting folks here aware of what they might not want to leave behind at the kill site. Where I typically see the most waste is not with deer so much but with pigs and waterfowl. Lots of guys will only debreast geese and toss the rest away in the field. Some wardens take extreme exception to this practice, especially those around the upper sacramento valley.


Common sense says take everything of value and leave everything else. Carrying out useless meat trimmings only to dispose of it later is a waste of time and effort. I personally try to recover any significant amount of meat on the neck, but sometimes its sparse. Moreover, by packing out the entire leg quarters, I probably recover more meat than if i boned it all out on the spot. Packing out ribs is a waste of effort. I listed about 90%+ of the useable meat on an elk that way more than meets the standard. The way you are apparently reading that statute would require you to pack out every little streak along with the liver, heart and pancreas among other parts. Some do if they personally like that stuff, most folks don't and I have never heard anyone called wrong, let alone cited for leaving it with the gut pile

No, I don't feel one has to retreive every scrap of meat or even any of the organ meat. But if one doesn't even try to recover the meat on the neck, riibs, brisket, ect.... yes that is indeed a clear violation. On the otherhand, if they do what you are saying, try to make an honest effort at recovery, then one shouldn't have any worries.

Hunter
07-23-2010, 9:33 PM
Some food for thought. Loren from our forum was cited for wanton waste of meat on a bear he killed way back in LPNF a few years back. He hiked out with the hide and skull of this big bear and went back for the meat, it was a long hike back to his honey hole. .....

I know this would have been a clear violation of my personal rules that meat always comes out first, with the hide, head, antlers being the last items out of the field, no exceptions. In some states, this is actually the law as well.


I remember a number of years ago, I was archery hunting in the Yolla Bolly area and took a nice buck down deep in the canyon near evening. As usual, it was very hot and when I finally got the deer meat out around 10pm it was still 90F. So I drove all the way into Redding to have the meat placed in a freezer for the night. I then drove back to my spot and hiked back into the canyon the next morning to retrieve the head and cape. For those that have hunted the YBs, you know how vertical the country can be there. It was a lot of work but that head still hangs on my wall today and reminds me of that little endeavour.

Sideline Shooter
07-23-2010, 10:09 PM
Don't tic off the non hunting public or you will get ad's like this in your local paper!!

bearstatearmory.com
07-24-2010, 1:05 PM
Don't tic off the non hunting public or you will get ad's like this in your local paper!!

WOW

ScottB
07-24-2010, 7:48 PM
LOL, yes I have done my fair share. The farthest I have had to pack a nice deer (with my backpack) was 8 miles with total of 7000ft of vertical climb (over 3 ridges). As for large animals, I have taken numerous 1000lb++ moose, some well over 2 miles from camp thru swamp and jack-knifed deadfall, not to mention large elk, nice caribous, and a few good size bears, ect. The only help have been from my hunting partner, if I had one on the trip, but many times it was just me. So yes, I am fully aware of the challenges of getting all athe meat out and trying to not waste it. I might add, that in some parts of AK, one is required by law to back out ALL MEAT on the bone, even the ribs. This law was put in place all due to the fact that people were deboning poorly and then they would end up loosing 2/3 of the boned meat from spoilage.

What I was responding to in your post was the comments about the neck and ribs. Yes, I have watched a CA warden (in the Trinity Alps) ticket a hunter for leaving the meat on the neck and shoulders behind. So while this law is open to interpretation by individual wardens, I just wanted to make the new hunting folks here aware of what they might not want to leave behind at the kill site. Where I typically see the most waste is not with deer so much but with pigs and waterfowl. Lots of guys will only debreast geese and toss the rest away in the field. Some wardens take extreme exception to this practice, especially those around the upper sacramento valley.




No, I don't feel one has to retreive every scrap of meat or even any of the organ meat. But if one doesn't even try to recover the meat on the neck, riibs, brisket, ect.... yes that is indeed a clear violation. On the otherhand, if they do what you are saying, try to make an honest effort at recovery, then one shouldn't have any worries.

We are on the same page :thumbsup:

wjc
07-24-2010, 9:20 PM
Don't tic off the non hunting public or you will get ad's like this in your local paper!!

:rofl:

bigboarstopper
07-25-2010, 10:31 AM
The conversation of throwing carcasses in the trash got me laughing. I have to confess. I used to have a little fun with my cleaned carcasses. There was a Planned Paranthood office not far from where I lived. (contraseptives and abortions) for those who dont know what the place is for. They used to have a group of people harass the doctors and patients while they picketed. I used to throw my hog carcasses and guts in their dumpster outside their office. Imagine the look on the anti abortionists when they rummaged through their trash for documents ect.

lewdogg21
07-25-2010, 11:25 AM
I dump all my bird carcasses (for ones where I breast out or breast and leg out) in the trash but they are in plastic garbage bags b/c my trash can would look like a slaughterhouse. Sometimes I wonder what the garbage man would think if anything.

dirtracer24
07-25-2010, 10:14 PM
last fall I killed two pheasants on a morning hunt. I decided I was gonna pluck them and deep fry em in my turkey fryer. so i just plucked them the hard way and threw all the feathers in the trash as I was plucking.
The day after trash day i was taking the house trash out(my cans are in an alley behind the house) and all the feathers were scattered throughout the alley, I still wonder if someones dog knocked over my can and tore though everything or if when they tryed to dump it the wind picked up and blew the feathers out everywhere. Almost a year later and I still find those feathers in the weeds back there.
by the way frying the pheasant in the turkey fryer was awesome, i even over cooked the first bird by a few minutes and it was still good. FYI about 12-16 minutes is all it took for an average sized bird, i dont remember the temp off the top of my head but it was the standard turkey frying temp.

sideshowhr
07-26-2010, 12:16 PM
do any of you prefer dry-ice over regular ice for the cooler?

ScottB
07-26-2010, 12:30 PM
Dry ice is better but its expensive

Whitesmoke
07-26-2010, 9:24 PM
Dry ice is better but its expensive

A little dry ice goes a LONG ways.....I can go a week camping without buying ice if a put a slab of dry ice in the bottom. I could even put ice cream in the ice chest an keep it edible.

aaronraby1
07-26-2010, 9:26 PM
turners has the big game bags. not badly priced either.

aaronraby1
07-26-2010, 9:26 PM
A little dry ice goes a LONG ways.....I can go a week camping without buying ice if a put a slab of dry ice in the bottom. I could even put ice cream in the ice chest an keep it edible.

mmm... im goign to go get some ice cream now. thanks!

coder44mag
07-27-2010, 7:06 PM
I use a 10lb block of dry ice with regular ice when camping for 3 days or more. Dry ice on bottom, with large back on top of that, plus smaller bags if you can. I put my frozen burger/steak/sirloin on top and make sure to defrost it the morning before the planned dinner (burgers/steak/chili for example). At day 3, I take fresh ice out and chill the beer which is in another cooler.

ScottB
07-27-2010, 7:43 PM
What are you paying for a 10 lb block these days?