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danito
07-16-2010, 11:34 AM
I found this earlier today and it was totally unexpected. Its a legacy application server running in the background

Current OS: Microsoft Windows 2000, Service Pack 4, Multiprocessor Free.
Time Zone: Pacific Daylight Time

Current System Uptime: 587 day(s), 21 hour(s), 27 minute(s), 35 second(s)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Since 9/1/2004:

System Availability: 99.9632%
Total Uptime: 2143d 0h:47m:40s
Total Downtime: 0d 18h:57m:2s
Total Reboots: 38
Mean Time Between Reboots: 56.42 days
Total Bluescreens: 0

Corbin Dallas
07-16-2010, 12:05 PM
I found this earlier today and it was totally unexpected. Its a legacy application server running in the background

Current OS: Microsoft Windows 2000, Service Pack 4, Multiprocessor Free.
Time Zone: Pacific Daylight Time

Current System Uptime: 587 day(s), 21 hour(s), 27 minute(s), 35 second(s)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Since 9/1/2004:

System Availability: 99.9632%
Total Uptime: 2143d 0h:47m:40s
Total Downtime: 0d 18h:57m:2s
Total Reboots: 38
Mean Time Between Reboots: 56.42 days
Total Bluescreens: 0


That's it?

You may see total up time, I see mean time between reboots...

Go Linux and you'll rarely reboot at all.

blisster
07-16-2010, 12:16 PM
what utility did you use to get those stats?

Cokebottle
07-16-2010, 12:34 PM
Go Linux and you'll rarely reboot at all.
You guys are ALMOST as bad as Mac fanbois :D

danito
07-16-2010, 12:44 PM
what utility did you use to get those stats?

Uptime.exe Utility

c:\uptime /s server

danito
07-16-2010, 1:03 PM
That's it?

You may see total up time, I see mean time between reboots...

Go Linux and you'll rarely reboot at all.

What ever floats your boat as they say. The right tool for the right job is what I say. The cookie cutter approach to all things Linux just doesn't work in my world, sorry to burst your bubble.

Getting back on subject that particular box was last rebooted on 12/5/2008 resulting in 587 days of uptime (do the math). At any rate I found it amusing considering it was Win 2000 server box.

Cokebottle
07-16-2010, 1:18 PM
Uptime.exe Utility

c:\uptime /s server
Not found on my XP installation.

odysseus
07-16-2010, 1:29 PM
Not found on my XP installation.

It wouldn't be. It's a technet/resource kit tool.

ocabj
07-16-2010, 1:47 PM
This isn't surprising to me. Windows 2000 was actually a pretty rock-solid OS. As long as you've got it firewalled beyond belief on any public facing interfaces, there's no reason why it can't maintain the uptime it's at now.

danito
07-16-2010, 1:57 PM
Its located in a stub zone with ACL's preventing the box from gaining resources beyound the isolated subnet it resides in. It's running a legacy app for our finance group. I had completely forgotten about this box, it turns out its our last windows 2000 box.

blisster
07-16-2010, 2:18 PM
Uptime.exe Utility

c:\uptime /s server


sweet, a quick google found the uptime.exe tool, but there wasn't much in the way of documentation and I took off for lunch instead of screwing with it.

thevic
07-16-2010, 2:33 PM
well my box hasnt been on for almost 4 months now :)

danito
07-16-2010, 3:10 PM
C:\>uptime /?

UPTIME, Version 1.01
(C) Copyright 1999, Microsoft Corporation

Uptime [server] [/s ] [/a] [/d:mm/dd/yyyy | /p:n] [/heartbeat] [/? | /help]
server Name or IP address of remote server to process.
/s Display key system events and statistics.
/a Display application failure events (assumes /s).
/d: Only calculate for events after mm/dd/yyyy.
/p: Only calculate for events in the previous n days.
/heartbeat Turn on/off the system's heartbeat
/? Basic usage.
/help Additional usage information.

Description:
UPTIME is a utility that processes the machine's event log to determine
system availability and current uptime. The target system can either be the
local system or a remote system. No special privileges are required for basic
operation although it is most accurate to run the tool under an administrative
account. Many factors affect these calculations, and the results displayed
by this tool should be considered estimates.

Requirements:
Availability calculations require:
Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 4 or higher, including Windows 2000.
Additionally the system "heartbeat" must be active.

The system "heartbeat" is a date/time stamp that is written to the system
registry at a fixed interval. This heartbeat is available in Service Pack 4
or higher. It is enabled by default on Windows NT Server. Since the
heartbeat causes the registry to be written to the disk at regular
intervals, it can interfere with systems running various forms of power
management. It is not recommended to enable the heartbeat of laptop systems.

To enable the heartbeat use: UPTIME /heartbeat [\\Machine]

If the heartbeat is disabled, or if you are not running Service Pack 4 or
greater, UPTIME may report that the event logs do not contain sufficient
information to calculate system availability. This is because UPTIME detects
an abnormal shutdown (for instance a bluescreen or power failure) but cannot
determine how long the system was down during this abnormal outage.

It is best to run uptime as an administrator, since much more information
is available to calculate system uptime and availability. For instance
the time zone of the system is important to many of the calculations, but
this information can only be reliably obtained by an administrator.
Additionally, when calculating the Current System Uptime, this tool attempts
to use the System Performance Counter for Uptime. However, if the user is not
an administrator, this counter may be unavailable. In this case an estimate
is made based on the last recorded boot noted in the event log.

Application Failures:
Application Failure event detection is dependent upon Dr Watson being enabled.

Bluescreens:
Bluescreen detection is dependent upon the system being configured to write an
event to the event log if the system stops unexpectedly.
To enable bluescreen event logging for Windows NT 4.0:
Go to the Control Panel and double click the System Icon.
Next select the startup/shutdown tab.
Finally check the "Write an event to the system log." check box.

To enable bluescreen event logging for Windows 2000 Systems do the following:
Go to the Control Panel and double click the System Icon.
Next select the "Advanced" tab.
From the "Advanced" property sheet select the "Startup and Recovery" button.
Finally check the "Write an event to the system log." check box.

Potential sources of error:
All calculations are based on the entries in the event log. If the
system time is altered significantly, this can have a dramatic affect on
the calculations made. Additionally if the event logs have been cleared,
or have filled, such that additional events cannot be written, this will
also affect this tools ability to accurately estimate system availability.

The heartbeat is generally written every 5 minutes, so the amount of downtime
calculated for abnormal outages is limited in accuracy to this window.

Systems that are a member of a cluster are currently unsupported by UPTIME.
If UPTIME detects that the target system may be a member of a cluster,
UPTIME will display a message stating that the results may be in error.

Where to go for more help:
For further information about this tool please see:
http://support.Microsoft.com/support and reference KB Article: Q232243

FluorideInMyWater
07-16-2010, 4:25 PM
turn off auto updates. is gonna reboot on ya

danito
07-18-2010, 8:21 PM
Autoupdates are enabled, however there is nothing to update, 2000 server is EOL

FluorideInMyWater
07-18-2010, 8:40 PM
Autoupdates are enabled, however there is nothing to update, 2000 server is EOL

hmm. ok, just a thought. happened to me a few times until i installed a windows update server locally and disabled auto updates.

danito
07-19-2010, 8:13 AM
hmm. ok, just a thought. happened to me a few times until i installed a windows update server locally and disabled auto updates.

Did you use Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) ? I have used it on larger deployments but find it diffcult to keep up with.

FluorideInMyWater
07-19-2010, 9:26 AM
Did you use Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) ? I have used it on larger deployments but find it diffcult to keep up with.

yes MSUS server. was really easy to set up took a few hours. then u can just pick and choose what u want to push and when

kf6rdn
07-19-2010, 8:45 PM
It wouldn't be. It's a technet/resource kit tool.

net statistics server will give you uptime on pretty much any windows box.

When I was at a large company, there was a novell server that had a 4+ year uptime.

We also couldn't find the damn thing. (A fairly large company which had certain networking aspects run by a corporate entity so we couldnt get a port address from a switch arp listing or anything.

Agreed about right tool, right job. I do windows & linux. For some things I like 1, for another the other.


For a file & print services though I don't think Novell netware stil has yet to be beat.