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chiselchst
07-14-2010, 8:10 PM
I wanted to discuss the correlation between a smooth trigger that has a clean crisp break, and accuracy.

I have a few handguns, and I was comparing all of the triggers tonight. My Para P14.45 Limited has by far the best trigger out of the group, and I shoot it more accurately than the others. However, it does have the longest sight radius.

How much of a "good trigger" has an influence on accuracy, versus sight radius? Or is it an equal combination of both (which I would guess?).

Thanks in advance!

trickyvic
07-14-2010, 8:24 PM
For me it's all practice. Given enough training I can shoot accurately with all my different trigger systems.

ty423
07-14-2010, 8:30 PM
I think it has alot to do with the muscles you are using while shooting. What I think makes the most difference to me is the weight of the pull... lighter is alot more accurate and easier to shoot for me...however more dangerous. After that it is how smooth it pulls. Crispness is the least important to me but does make a difference...this is just from my own experience...

I just remembered that my friend changed his glock to a 3.5# trigger and it was so much easier and groups got tighter...such a cheap mod that almost anybody can do.. but like I said it is more dangerous and wouldn't recommend for carry.

BamBam-31
07-14-2010, 8:38 PM
For me, a good trigger pull and clean sight picture are extremely important for accuracy. Trigger pull doesn't have to be a 0.75# glass rod, however. Just not a 12# seven-stage ordeal over gravel. And sights have to be clean and sharp, serrated preferably, w/ some daylight in the gaps.

XDRoX
07-14-2010, 8:42 PM
IMO trigger is more important than site radius. It would be interesting to see data.

Shenaniguns
07-14-2010, 8:47 PM
I'll tell you the difference between a factory M&P 9mm and an Apex Tactical DCAEK made a huge difference in consistency.

tiko
07-14-2010, 8:51 PM
IMO trigger is more important than site radius. It would be interesting to see data.

I agreed, with good trigger, I can shoot my S&W 2" .357 snubbie better than my 4.5" M&P45.

UserM4
07-14-2010, 8:57 PM
For me it's all practice. Given enough training I can shoot accurately with all my different trigger systems.

+1

I have taken 6 guns to the range before, all with completely different triggers, and after a couple of magazines, I group pretty much the same with all of them except the slight variances in sight radius. A good trigger is nice to have but I've never run across a gun that I couldn't get used to, except one G17 range rental that obviously had a malfunction trigger that stacked and broke at over 12#. I think I could've even got over that one if I had enough ammo left.

chiselchst
07-14-2010, 8:58 PM
I'll tell you the difference between a factory M&P 9mm and an Apex Tactical DCAEK made a huge difference in consistency.

I have an M&P 45 in the pipe - and was already planning on some sort of Apex trigger improvement (from the info I've researched about the trigger).

Thanks everyone...:D

bombadillo
07-14-2010, 9:01 PM
For rifles I think its more of an issue, but most triggers on pistols save a few are decent. I know there are 1911 vs. glock and what not but I can relatively accurately keep similar patterns with all my handguns.

Shenaniguns
07-14-2010, 9:01 PM
I have an M&P 45 in the pipe - and was already planning on some sort of Apex trigger improvement (from the info I've researched about the trigger).

Thanks everyone...:D


I mainly bought an M&P thanks to Apex Tactical :D

Shenaniguns
07-14-2010, 9:09 PM
BTW, I didn't get specific of my recent experience with a Calgunner's stock M&P vs. my polished DCAEK, but when I was dry firing his gun I couldn't keep the sight from going towards 2 o'clock no matter how much I tried. I believe it was a combination of the gritty break and overtravel that made me do that consistently.

sholling
07-14-2010, 9:15 PM
Practice, practice, practice.

Shenaniguns
07-14-2010, 9:16 PM
Practice, practice, practice.



Practice with a consistent trigger and good sights >>> *

sd1023x
07-14-2010, 9:55 PM
It's all about technique. Me personally, I shoot equally well with a HK USP45 as I do with a Glock 26. Different guns, same consistent outcome for me. Line up those sights and squeeze don't pull the trigger.

chiselchst
07-14-2010, 10:38 PM
Thanks for the feedback CalGunners....

One fairly recent experience I've had, was shooting a G21. And being extremely accurate with it after not firing it for sometime. While it didn't have a *good* trigger IMHO, it was extremely predictable and I did surprising well with it...FWIW.

Thanks again everyone.

PS Plus I have opposite eye domination - or whatever it's called....

Turbinator
07-16-2010, 5:18 AM
This thread reminded me of the $.25 Glock trigger job.

http://www.alpharubicon.com/mrpoyz/glock/

Turby

OneSevenDeuce
07-16-2010, 10:28 AM
For me, the trigger is the biggest single factor in getting the most accuracy out of any firearm. There are tons of things you can do to eek out more accuracy from your firearms but the best thing you can do is get a smooth, light trigger pull. You can however nullify a lot of trigger issues with practice, but there is no substitution for a nice trigger.

j1133s
07-16-2010, 10:40 AM
I wanted to discuss the correlation between a smooth trigger that has a clean crisp break, and accuracy.

I have a few handguns, and I was comparing all of the triggers tonight. My Para P14.45 Limited has by far the best trigger out of the group, and I shoot it more accurately than the others. However, it does have the longest sight radius.

How much of a "good trigger" has an influence on accuracy, versus sight radius? Or is it an equal combination of both (which I would guess?).

Thanks in advance!

I think a lot depends on the type of shooting. If you are shooting fast and sloppy (COM hits), then sight radius (or better pointing) is more important than trigger. An extra inch of length helps more then a slightly lighter trigger. For slow, accurate shots, trigger is more important as you've got time to line up the sights but a heavier trigger might just make your pull disturb the alignment enough to miss that X.

Of course, I'm not talking about extremes, i.e. no way I can align a 1.5" sight radius. Same goes for extremely crappy triggers., I think my limit is 12lb.

esskay
07-16-2010, 10:42 AM
Many folks believe trigger control is the single most important factor for shooting handguns accurately. And a better trigger makes it easier to have good trigger control.

Envision -- You have an object in your hands that weighs a couple pounds which you are holding on target. Then you need to use a single finger to press on a small lever which might take 2x-3x or more as much weight to break! Then at the same time your body is anticipating the contained explosion that's about to happen in your hands, right in front of your face. So you can see how all that would contribute to jerking the gun off target! ;) Make the trigger lighter & crisper and it eases one part of the equation.

Shenaniguns
07-16-2010, 10:46 AM
How is this even a debate? lol

HCz
07-16-2010, 10:49 AM
Good trigger helps with accuracy IF the shooter has skills to utilize it.

Shenaniguns
07-16-2010, 10:50 AM
Good trigger helps with accuracy IF the shooter has skills to utilize it.


This is very true, some people shoot good/bad regardless of the trigger they are squeezing.

mif_slim
07-16-2010, 11:23 AM
I remember when ipsc changed the rule for trigger # from .75# to 1# (exaggerated) all the top shooters complained....

now for me, I can shoot just about any gun put there, heavy, light, sloppy, floppy etc... just that if the trigger is lighter it's just added ease. but I tend to like to shoot OE trigger for the sake that if I ever red to pik up any gun in the streets I can shoot it and not complain I could of protected my family if I had a lighter trigger pull. the muscles don't lie.

MarioS
07-16-2010, 11:32 PM
In my opinion, everything else equal, a good trigger has a lot to do with accuracy. The trick is getting enough practice so you can operate any trigger (like a stock Glock trigger with a break like a wet twig) and not have it affect your accuracy or induce movement in your gun during the pull.