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Whitesmoke
07-03-2010, 12:04 PM
What would be a good but inexpensive used starter bow to look for? How do I know what will fit me? I'm a 5'9" 230 lbs stronger than average man. What pull weight, etc?

I would like to buy something inexpensive to try for awhile to see if this something I want to pursue. Right now..I'm just wanting to extend my hunting season and try something new. I can't justify right now going down to the local archery shop and buying a whole new setup. Any thoughts?

180ls1
07-03-2010, 12:15 PM
Go around to the local bow shops and talk to them, they will help you out. A lot of them have used racks and you can snag a pretty decent one for under $200 and see if you like the whole bow thing or not.

toby
07-03-2010, 12:56 PM
Go around to the local bow shops and talk to them, they will help you out. A lot of them have used racks and you can snag a pretty decent one for under $200 and see if you like the whole bow thing or not.

Yes good advice some shops even have a indoor range you can shoot in they will let you shoot before you buy. Get fitted or measured look at the Bows get info and if you need to save some $$ look for something used I just sold a PSE outfit here on 'calguns' and there are a few others for sale now.

fusionstar
07-03-2010, 1:08 PM
I find bow shops/pro shops are only good for small nick knacks and trying out gear and getting measured before buying online. I have never went to one that even sold anything at retail price. Aside from a cabelas or a basspro. It can get expensive.. Like a new decked out AR expensive.. or can be as cheap as you want.

norcal01
07-03-2010, 1:35 PM
Definately worth looking around for a used one. I bought a used Hoyt that was being sold on consignment at a local store. It was already set up and even though it's not the greatest bow out there I am completely happy with it. It took me a while to build up enough confidence to hunt with it but once I did and had some success hunting I was hooked. Good luck!

Hunt
07-03-2010, 2:48 PM
make sure you get the arrows tuned and matched to the pull and weight. If you get too thin arrow shaft, darn things will flex and bow too much during flight and will never be accurate. Also the speed of sound is much faster than the speed of an arrow, so consider as quiet a system as possible. I have shot right at a bucks chest he had an instictive reaction to the sound and jumped straight up and arrow barely cleared under him. Think quiet very quiet.

this book has a ton of relevant info http://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Open-Country-Mule-Dwight-Schuh/dp/0912299231

DirtyDave
07-03-2010, 3:44 PM
Bowfishing is a cheap way to get started and a ton of fun. Its like carp were made to be shot. You will see a lot more action than going on your first hunt and not even seeing a deer.

jawbreaker
07-03-2010, 5:31 PM
I find bow shops/pro shops are only good for small nick knacks and trying out gear and getting measured before buying online. I have never went to one that even sold anything at retail price. Aside from a cabelas or a basspro. It can get expensive.. Like a new decked out AR expensive.. or can be as cheap as you want.
That has got to be the worst advice about buying a bow I have heard( no offence). When you buy a bow at an archery shop you might pay a little more than you do on line but you do not get the service from the online store as you do at the pro shop, and who is going to set the bow up for you, by that I mean install the peepsite, string loop drop away rests and tune up the proper draw length and so on. When you buy a bow online and bring it to the shop to have them set it up they will charge you for that.

Can you buy a bow online for less money? Maybe.
Will it be worth the savings of buying it online? Maybe
In my opinion the service you get at a good pro shop is well worth the extra cost of a bow, which isn't that much anyways.


One more thing about buying a bow, If you think you might really get into the sport I would save up some money and buy a mid grade bow, it will cost you $400 give or take for the bare bow but it is one that you won't be replacing in a season or two. As said above a used bow is also a good option if you are on a budget, just make sure you shoot it and make sure it feels right for you. Just because my bow feels great to my style of shooting doesn't mean it will do the same for you, no matter what it costs.

GVOllie
07-04-2010, 6:13 AM
Getting fit properly is the most important thing. Even if you know what weight you can comfortably pull and what your draw length is, there are still minor adjustments to be made that make a world of difference. I bought my bow used for $150, but I have also spend several hundred dollars in changes/adjustments/add-ons in my pro shop.

If there's nothing in the classifieds here, or nothing at your local shop, try the archery talk classifieds. That's where I bought my PSE, and I was very happy with the deal. I also bought my new strings from one of their members. You could also try one of the ready built packages from Hunter's Friend site.

As to hunting, if you have not spent a lot of time practicing with a bow, I would suggest putting of actual hunting until next season. You will want plenty of time to get proficient before trying to take game with one.

lewdogg21
07-04-2010, 6:38 AM
That has got to be the worst advice about buying a bow I have heard( no offence). When you buy a bow at an archery shop you might pay a little more than you do on line but you do not get the service from the online store as you do at the pro shop, and who is going to set the bow up for you, by that I mean install the peepsite, string loop drop away rests and tune up the proper draw length and so on. When you buy a bow online and bring it to the shop to have them set it up they will charge you for that.

Can you buy a bow online for less money? Maybe.
Will it be worth the savings of buying it online? Maybe
In my opinion the service you get at a good pro shop is well worth the extra cost of a bow, which isn't that much anyways.


One more thing about buying a bow, If you think you might really get into the sport I would save up some money and buy a mid grade bow, it will cost you $400 give or take for the bare bow but it is one that you won't be replacing in a season or two. As said above a used bow is also a good option if you are on a budget, just make sure you shoot it and make sure it feels right for you. Just because my bow feels great to my style of shooting doesn't mean it will do the same for you, no matter what it costs.


Best advice so far. Archery isn't as simple as pulling back the string and aiming. There are techniques that will make you more accurate if you learn and follow them. This could be the difference between killing an animal or missing/wounding one. You should get some lessons and practice/practice/practice.

I started Archery hunting about 5 years ago.
My first archery season was a trip to Oregon for Elk/Deer. I did not shoot at an animal but I did draw on a 5 point at about 53 yards. The bull was on the edge of the timber and it was nearly dark so I could only see the head/neck and I did not take the shot. During this I had the shakes so I couldn't take the shot anyways. For the next year I practiced my butt off (3-4x a week) for the 2.5 months before the season. I then got my opportunity and made a shot on a 5pt. but the difference this time was that I was so confident I know I could kill anything out to 50-55 yards. I had to hold full draw for close to 2 minutes according to my partner who was 8 yards behind me. It was if I had ice water in my veins. After I made the shot and we saw him fall that's when the emotions hit me. I credit my confidence to all that practice.

Oh yeah it was my first bow kill and I needed a couple stiff whiskey cokes back at camp to calm the shakes due to nerves/adrenaline. :D

mif_slim
07-04-2010, 7:57 PM
Well you can be very string but the part of muscle you use for a bow is not a muscle used dAily...I've seen guys benching 200+ lbs and can't pull a 70lbs bow.

Like most say, visit a local bow shop and try a few to see if you like it. If you decided to buy they will size you up for what's "average" but make sure you custome size to fit your comfort.
I can tell you that hunting with a bow seems 200x more rewarding then with a rifle....at least for me.

Trapper
07-04-2010, 10:20 PM
It's worth spending the extra time and money at a local archery shop. The money saved by learning from their experience will exceed what you could have saved on-line. You may also want to check out some of the local 3D archery matches, talk to shooters and get tips on the latest gear.
Bow hunting will give you access to more land and you'll be able to enjoy extend hunting seasons.

Rusty_Buckhorn
07-05-2010, 6:20 AM
It is worth it to spend some time at the bow shop to test as many bows as you can. Pick 1 you feel real comfortable with.... then go buy it on e-bay. Then you take that bow back to the bow shop for them to set-up for you, it won't cost much. I'm all for supporting your local bow shop, but the mark-up on a bow is just too much($2-$300). Whether you buy your bow from a shop or online, they will be MORE than happy to set it up for you, sell you arrows/broadheads, and lessons if you want. You should be able to find a used bow, 1-3 yrs old, with all the goodies, for $400-$500. I shoot an '07 bow, and none of the newer bows feel better enough to make me upgrade yet.

Whitesmoke
07-07-2010, 1:13 PM
Thanks for all the input...I wasn't planning on hunting with it this year, but I have to start somewhere.

Are there any brands to stay away from? It seems like Bear is not well respected? who else?

mif_slim
07-07-2010, 2:36 PM
I started with a Fred bear back in 1992... I went to all bow brands From. Browning to pse to mathews etc... From 100.00 bow to 1400.00 bow...

Last year was one of my most successful deer hunt... I got 2 bears in two states and got 2 deer in CA, 8 in WN and 2 in NC, all with a Fred bear lightsout.

People don't like them just like xd vs glock.

Rusty_Buckhorn
07-07-2010, 3:24 PM
don't trust what ANYONE says about the different brands. Everyones opinions will be different, skewed towards the brand they shoot. If it were me, I'd tell you to find an '07 Bowtech Allegiance(can find them for $3-400 used), and never look back, but I'm biased. The key is to shoot as many as you can, and go with whatever feels most comfortable to YOU.

Stockton
07-07-2010, 3:41 PM
I was in your shoes early last year. IMHO a bow shop will give you a bigger smile in the end rather than ordering one them bringing it to a bow shop anyways. I shot 10 different bows before I decided on a Mission bow made by Mathews. Everything from arrows to the adjustments for me cost me less than 600 out the door with several free goodies and lots of advise.

Good luck!

PS. Not sure what you hunt but for me the bow was only a fraction of the gear. Target, field tips, arrows, broadheads, treestand, scents, field dressing equipment, and of course tags. It has been a blast nonetheless!