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Casual_Shooter
06-23-2010, 8:14 PM
Hi all,

I have a few different thumb drives I use for rotating back-ups (among other things).

I would like to protect them from prying eyes in the event I misplace them. Understanding nothing is foolproof, does anyone have recommendations for password protecting them?

I'm on a Mac if that matters.

Thanks.

armygunsmith
06-23-2010, 8:17 PM
use Truecrypt. The application exists on the drive and the encrypted file can be made to appear as any type of file.

Casual_Shooter
06-23-2010, 8:34 PM
use Truecrypt. The application exists on the drive and the encrypted file can be made to appear as any type of file.

Excellent. Reading up on it now.

Thanks!

JDay
06-23-2010, 9:47 PM
Get an IronKey. It is the worlds most secure thumb drive. You can also use it on other peoples computers to surf the web securely.

https://www.ironkey.com/

winnre
06-23-2010, 9:54 PM
Get an IronKey. It is the worlds most secure thumb drive. You can also use it on other peoples computers to surf the web securely.

https://www.ironkey.com/

THIS!

SkyStorm82
06-23-2010, 10:31 PM
Those Ironkeys are expensive! They look pretty hardcore though.

bigwhitetruck
06-24-2010, 1:03 AM
I use a SanDisk Micro U3 Cruzer that is password protected.

odysseus
06-24-2010, 1:09 AM
Get an IronKey. It is the worlds most secure thumb drive. You can also use it on other peoples computers to surf the web securely.

https://www.ironkey.com/

Seems as though they are proprietary and only use AES-256 crypto (which is fine - I am not knocking AES). Not sure on how they hash it either. Costs money, looks overpriced.

Truecrypt is open source tested, free, and comes with multiple methods of encryption, including AES-256, and allows for multiple different encryptions methods to be applied at the same time. You can use this on any of your existing mem sticks and hard drives.

JDay
06-24-2010, 3:45 PM
Seems as though they are proprietary and only use AES-256 crypto (which is fine - I am not knocking AES). Not sure on how they hash it either. Costs money, looks overpriced.

Truecrypt is open source tested, free, and comes with multiple methods of encryption, including AES-256, and allows for multiple different encryptions methods to be applied at the same time. You can use this on any of your existing mem sticks and hard drives.

The Ironkey is worth the price and it is quite secure (its been DoD audited and no vulnerability has been found). AES-256 is used to secure data classified Top Secret. You'll also notice that they are FIPS certified. These drives a very nice in a corporate environment, if a user forgets their password you can recover it with the master key. They are also constructed in such a way that causes physical attacks to destroy the cryptochip, rendering the data useless.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Information_Processing_Standard

Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government for use by all non-military government agencies and by government contractors. Many FIPS standards are modified versions of standards used in the wider community (ANSI, IEEE, ISO, etc.).

https://www.ironkey.com/rugged-design


An IronKey drive is an investment that will last for years. Ruggedized and waterproof to military specifications, its metal casing protects internal components against physical damage, shock, the elements, and tampering. The casing is filled with an epoxy-based potting compound to seal all components against moisture and tampering. This combination also prevents the drive from being crushed, even under extremely high pressure. The result is a virtually unbreakable digital strongbox for storing your most private information, passwords, and files.

Sealed and Tamper-Resistant

Self-defending IronKey devices are designed to protect themselves from physical attacks—even by a determined and sophisticated hacker. A tough epoxy compound surrounds and completely encases the chips and circuitry. This makes it very difficult, if not impossible, for anyone to remove the memory in an attempt to access the data by removing the chips and placing them on another device. Any such attempt would cause permanent damage to the chips, rendering the stored data unreadable.

IronKey devices also employ tamper-reaction technology in their firmware. The Cryptochip defends itself against power analysis, temperature, and probing attacks. It will self-destruct by erasing the data and keys when it detects any of these types of attacks.

Electromagnetically Shielded

In addition to the epoxy potting compound, IronKey devices are protected by thin-film metal shielding around the onboard memory. This electromagnetic shielding provides another layer of defense against tampering by protecting against invasive attacks such as electronic scanning of the memory contents.

Waterproof

IronKey devices have passed—and exceeded—military waterproof standards (MIL-STD-810F). IronKey devices are built to ensure your data survives the toughest use; they can survive everything from wet field conditions to a trip through the washing machine.