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View Full Version : Question about Glocks and their "unsupported chambers"...


Rock_Islander
06-23-2010, 11:36 AM
Good day to all,

I have been eyeing Glocks for awhile now, and I particularly like the Glock 17, 19, & 21-SF. My problem is that I own two 1911s, which are fantastic shooters, and come/came standard since the beginning of their production with SUPPORTED FIRING CHAMBERS.

I hope I'm not stirring up a hornets' nest with this one, but how important is the "less" supported chamber of Glocks when it comes to reloading ammo? I ask because I reload .45 for my 1911s which saves me a great deal of money and produces my special loads which are full power factor and tremendously accurate.

I've seen the "horror" stories on the internet that includes pictures and paragraphs upon paragraphs of how Glocks tend to warp brass, when even fired just once from a Glock... Not good for a reloader.

If anybody with some real true experience(s) on Glock shooting combined with regular reloading can chime in, it'd be shmaaaantastic.

Thanks,

R.I.

Josh3239
06-23-2010, 11:55 AM
RI, I am far from an expert on this so I"ll let someone else take it but I will tell you that there are a lot of very nice aftermarket barrels you can buy for Glocks and many of them do have fully supported chambers. The unsupported chambers have been good enough for literally thousands of law enforcement agencies around the world, plus miltiaries around the world and private shooters.

Rock_Islander
06-23-2010, 12:03 PM
Yeah I've heard of some of those, like Lone Wolf barrels... But if I could really just buy a gun and have it be "good/safe" enough from the get go, that'd be ideal for me.

I know that the unsupported chambers have been good enough for those that stick their life on the lines, but many of those active operators do not have to worry about reloading their own ammo. They either are issued brand new ammo for training use, or they can afford brand new ammo regularly. I have a friend that is a Law Enforcement Officer in Oakland, and he reloads ZERO of his own ammo.

I just want to know how good an idea it is for reloaders to pick up brass from their fired Glocks..

IMC87
06-23-2010, 12:52 PM
meh, I reload 'glocked' brass. Never had a problem with it. In fact about 95% of my brass is 'glocked', since I get my brass from a police academy range

ap3572001
06-23-2010, 1:28 PM
I own ( and owned) several Glocks in 9mm, 40 and 45. With good factory ammo and if used AS ISSUED, I never had any problems.

bohoki
06-23-2010, 2:01 PM
i dislike the term unsupported chambers

the real term should be excessively throated

glock feels it is necessary for reliabiltity so its hard to argue with that

you don't have to buy a glock

Marlin Hunter
06-23-2010, 2:09 PM
The simple answer is: If you shoot quality factory ammo out of your "clean" Glock you will not have a problems. If you do get a blow-out from factory ammo, it is probably the ammo's fault and it would have happened with any gun. I don't recommend steel case ammo in any gun except cheap Chinese military guns.

I had a Glock 17 before someone took it without my permission. It could/would shoot any type of Factory ammo that it was fed. I never saw any problems with a blown out case. I reloaded tens of thousands of rounds with copper plated lead for that gun, and never had any problems. I never used bare lead bullets since the copper plated stuff was so cheap (20+ years ago). I recently shot about 50 rounds of cast lead through another Glock 17 with no problems, but lead build-up is a concern, and needs to be watched since too much lead in the barrel can cause over pressure and destruction. I have a couple friends with Glock 17s and they had case separation and magazine blowout with Load-X 9mm FMJ ammo. I don't know if the gun was dirty or clean, so I can't really say why it happened. I have read several posts on other websites about blown up Glocks. They were all from reloads.

Glock has been around for many years and has a very good track record. The reason why you hear so many bad things about Glock is because there are so many Glocks out there, and because the are made from plastic. I am sure that if the internet was around 100 years ago, you would hear a lot about 1911s problems.

civilsnake
06-23-2010, 2:24 PM
It's my understanding that the 9mm Glocks do have a fully supported chamber. It's the .45s that have the biggest issue. I've also read that replacing the barrel with something with more support can have a negative impact on feeding.

drunktank
06-23-2010, 3:32 PM
I'm going to look it up for reference, but I though a Calgunner posted a picture comparing the barrels and how glock changed it in recent years to "beef" it up...

Rock_Islander
06-23-2010, 5:31 PM
Hmm I see.

So apparently then, the unsupported/less-supported chamber is designed that way for enhanced feeding and reliability?

Although I like two of the 9mm models (the 17 & 19) I think I'd be 95% or more leaning towards a Glock 21-SF because my reloader is rigged up exclusively for .45 right now. I absolutely have fallen in love with .45acp. Hearing that Glocks don't have the best support for .45's is a little disheartening.

I know I don't have to buy a glock, but man those things are accurate, and dependable. What more can one ask for a $500 gun? Plus the bore-axis is real low just like a 1911. The barrels on both of those designs, have them sitting right-on-top of your grip! Better for shot to shot placement and speed.

Rock_Islander
06-23-2010, 5:35 PM
I actually like the XD line of guns, the only thing that turns me off is the HIGH bore-axis. They are a bit top heavy.. But real attractive, solid too.

Sinixstar
06-23-2010, 5:44 PM
Most of the documented kaBoom cases that i've seen floating around, have been from .40S&W chambered glocks. There have also been similar kB reports from Sig and even a few from Beretta. There is a dis-proportionally high number of kB reports on the glock though, and like I said, the vast majority from the .40 (i'm not aware of any from 9mm or .45)

Now - that makes sense. When you look at the pressures of the .40S&W round, you're looking at pressures up in the 38,000PSI range. It's far more sensitive in terms of how it's loaded, case capacity, seating depth, etc. It's a very very picky round to load. Everything has to be exactly in line, or you very well may face problems.

Generally speaking - it's still a great round - but when you start throwing hand-loads into the mix - the potential is there for some big problems. Being such a picky round about case capacity, and running at the standard pressures it runs at, even slightly damaged factory ammo could cause a problem.

Now given all that - if you throw in a chamber that's "excessively throated" or "not fully supported" or however you want to say it - you're more likely to have a combination of circumstances that lends it's self to catastrophic failure. Where as those circumstances are less likely (but not impossible) to occur in say a .45acp which operates in the 20,000 max psi range.

So I guess what i'm saying is - it comes down to a combination of pressure, careful loading, and gun design. Any gun or round has the potential for failure. However the .40 is a round that operates at higher pressures and is sensitive to loading. It's more likely I think, to get .40 that's out of spec and over pressure. This can lend it's self to catastrophic failure if placed in the wrong gun.

NotEnoughGuns
06-23-2010, 6:32 PM
I reload for my 40 cal glock but I don't load to full house pressures. Usually less then max loads are more accurate anyway.
45acp is a low pressure round and I wouldn't hesitate reloading for a glock in that caliber.

dieselpower
06-23-2010, 7:14 PM
I read a thread on Glocktalk or teamglock where the whole thing was dismissed as bunk

IICR there are hundreds of firearms with the same size space on the underside of the chambers. its a non-issue.

Cobrafreak
06-23-2010, 7:58 PM
Glocks are tested at the factory randomly to run hundreds of "proof rounds" to make sure they are safe. I doubt any hand loads you do will be more powerful than a proof round. If you do, then you need to get a fully supported chambered barrel.

Hatchet
06-23-2010, 8:02 PM
I just saw a picture recently of a G21 that kb'd, but I don't know what the circs are. I agree with sinixstar about 40 cal and the pressures it develops. 45 ACP is literally about half the chamber pressure that 40 is. I carried a G22 for years and never had a problem, but I only fed it quality new ammo (issued).

If it were my money I wouldn't hesitate to buy a Glock 9 or 45, but I would avoid 40, 10mm, or 357 Sig. Buy hey, that's just my opinion...

SLYoteBoy
06-23-2010, 8:12 PM
The only badside of unsupported chambers from what I could gather, is that it chews the brass up making it harder to reload. Neither do I reload (yet) or own a Glock (couple days). So I cant vouch for this 100 %.

civilsnake
06-23-2010, 8:14 PM
Okay you guys keep mentioning "kaboom", but that's not what the OP is asking about.

.45acp Glocks are rumored to be "hard on brass", meaning that they supposedly can cause bulging and deformation in a small area near the case rim due to the fact that the underside of the cartridge is not fully contained in the chamber; there is a section where the feed ramp cuts into the bottom of the chamber allowing for more reliable loading.

The 9mm doesn't apparently have the same problem because the narrower cartridge doesn't have issues with binding up like the .45acp does.

He's concerned with the brass being unusable, not a kaboom.

At least that's what I gathered.

tacticalcity
06-23-2010, 8:16 PM
I absolutely love my Glock 19 2nd Gen. No issues at all. But I run factory produced ammo thru it. It helps that I do not have to pay retail for my ammo. Bad ammo could cause any gun to explode.

Marlin Hunter
06-23-2010, 8:21 PM
The only badside of unsupported chambers from what I could gather, is that it chews the brass up making it harder to reload. Neither do I reload (yet) or own a Glock (couple days). So I cant vouch for this 100 %.


My 20+ year old Glock 17 9mm never damaged the brass in any way. I have not shot any Glocks in the past 10 years, so it may be different now, but I don't see why the ammo manufacturers would change their recipes. I never shot I pressure loads out of the Glock. I think Fiocchi was the hottest loads I used and I never had a problem.

Rock_Islander
06-23-2010, 8:40 PM
Okay you guys keep mentioning "kaboom", but that's not what the OP is asking about.

.45acp Glocks are rumored to be "hard on brass", meaning that they supposedly can cause bulging and deformation in a small area near the case rim due to the fact that the underside of the cartridge is not fully contained in the chamber; there is a section where the feed ramp cuts into the bottom of the chamber allowing for more reliable loading.

The 9mm doesn't apparently have the same problem because the narrower cartridge doesn't have issues with binding up like the .45acp does.

He's concerned with the brass being unusable, not a kaboom.

At least that's what I gathered.

Civilsnake hit it on the head. I'm asking about that exact problem of bulging and deformation that occurs (or possibly occurs) to once or more fired Glock shot brass. If brass is damaged in such a way it could lead to the famous Kaboom at one point or another from that piece of brass.

Like I said, I like Glocks, but I MUST reload. Safely. If its truly an issue then I may consider another polymer frame pistol for my needs.

Hatchet
06-23-2010, 8:44 PM
Okay you guys keep mentioning "kaboom", but that's not what the OP is asking about.

.45acp Glocks are rumored to be "hard on brass", meaning that they supposedly can cause bulging and deformation in a small area near the case rim due to the fact that the underside of the cartridge is not fully contained in the chamber; there is a section where the feed ramp cuts into the bottom of the chamber allowing for more reliable loading.

The 9mm doesn't apparently have the same problem because the narrower cartridge doesn't have issues with binding up like the .45acp does.

He's concerned with the brass being unusable, not a kaboom.

At least that's what I gathered.

Yeah, I re-read it from the top and I apologize for getting off track. Thanks for the nudge. I'll just STFU, since I have no experience reloading for these.

Seriously, thanks.

Sinixstar
06-23-2010, 9:09 PM
Okay you guys keep mentioning "kaboom", but that's not what the OP is asking about.

.45acp Glocks are rumored to be "hard on brass", meaning that they supposedly can cause bulging and deformation in a small area near the case rim due to the fact that the underside of the cartridge is not fully contained in the chamber; there is a section where the feed ramp cuts into the bottom of the chamber allowing for more reliable loading.

The 9mm doesn't apparently have the same problem because the narrower cartridge doesn't have issues with binding up like the .45acp does.

He's concerned with the brass being unusable, not a kaboom.

At least that's what I gathered.


You can't really talk about brass deforming without talking about kaBooms.

If you take that bulged brass and put just a little more pressure on it - guess what happens?

The only difference between the two is severity.

bucktooth7
06-23-2010, 9:30 PM
I own and shoot a g17 alot I have never had the KB problem although I have heard about it. Veteran shooters tell me not to reload the cases more than 3 times. They say that the unsupported area at the rear of the case has alot of stress and if by chance that area ends up at the bottom of the chamber (unsupported area) too many times it may blow out sending exteme force downward threw the trigger area. ( Thats where you finger is). It's easy to tell wich cases have been g fired by the sq striker mark.

Sinixstar
06-23-2010, 9:46 PM
Couple other points that should probably be made...

1) glock has updated their design over the years. You go back to the early/mid 90s, and this was a far greater problem then it is today. The unsupported area was far greater and there was less knowledge/concern on the part of shooters about it. It's not nearly the issue it once was...

2) any autoloader is prone to this. The reason being is it's not a gun problem so much as it's an ammo problem. If your brass is bulging or splitting, it's because either your brass is worn out/bad, or your rounds are over pressure. Either way - stop shooting it.

3) I don't want to give anybody the impression that it ONLY happens in the .40. Just that load-sensitive rounds like the .40 and the .357sig are more prone - since it's more an ammo problem than a gun problem.

Brian2217
06-23-2010, 9:47 PM
I have A G 22. So far I have had no issues shooting my reloads and there has been no damage to the brass. I also reload a lot of 45. I put these through my Kimber and S&W M&P with no issues to the brass. I should also add that reload for range use only and I stay within spec of the reloading manual.

MarioS
06-23-2010, 9:55 PM
I believe it is more of a problem with .40S&W Glock chambers, but I've mainly only shot/reloaded 9mm and .40S&W out of Glocks. The bulge in the case was pretty bad out of my .40S&W Glock but it wasn't really an issue with my 9mm. I reloaded a few thousand rounds of 9mm with brass out of my Glock with no problem. I reloaded a number of rounds shot out of the stock Glock .40 barrel which were fine as well. I ended up just getting a Lone Wolf barrel for it with more support so I didn't have to worry about it at all. There are others that say it is totally fine but I just didn't want to have any doubt at all, especially since .40S&W is a higher pressure cartridge.

There are press setups you can buy that fully resize the entire length of the case so fix "Glocked" brass. You could look into that if you are interested.

Sinixstar
06-23-2010, 9:57 PM
There are press setups you can buy that fully resize the entire length of the case so fix "Glocked" brass. You could look into that if you are interested.

Not the best idea. At that point the brass is weakened. Exposing it to chamber pressures again is just asking for trouble..

CGK60
06-24-2010, 4:30 AM
Reloaded Glock brass, never had a problem.

Voo
06-24-2010, 6:13 AM
I reloaded something like 30,000+ rounds of 9mm over a 12 month period (I count by primer sleeves used). This was predominantly shot through my G34, OEM 9mm barrel. No issues what so ever.

The bulging is typically called Glock Bulge and is fairly noticeable on .40 s&w brass. You dont' see 9mm brass thats bulged/deformed very often unless chambers are over throated or you're shooting with guys who run 9major. 9major is exactly the same as 9mm in dimensions except there's literally almost double the powder. This stresses and stretches out the brass quite a bit and is noticeable both to the naked eye as well as when you go to reload it. It'll require a bit more force when you're trying to resize it. In my experience, however, you dont' really see 9mm glocks bulging brass.. .40 caliber, however, is a different story but how you handle it is exactly the same.

What you can do is run a Lee FCD die in the last station (not for crimping) but a final sizing as it actually sizes further down than most other dies. That's typically the problem as the brass is stretched out in one particular area, most dies are unable to size that far down onto the brass. Hence you run a slightly "longer" die to handle this. The other die commonly used die is EGW's U die? It also sizes further down to remove the bulge. My friend(s) who reload .40 caliber do this. We shoot competitively and they reload 10,000's a round a year. No issues from any of them.

There's also a new single stage type die that pushes the brass completely through a sizing ring. To me, that's a nightmare as you need to run each piece individually. If the brass is that mangled where it needs to be sized 100%, im throwing it out. Im not so worried about the bulge as I am about the time it takes to do this. The U-die and Lee FCD are more than adequate.

Most modern pistols have more/less unsupported areas. Depending on how "hot" the ammo is loaded will typically also factor in on how deformed the brass will be. I reload fairly soft and while I dont count the number of times I reload a piece of brass, I know that in some cases, it's been used at least 3-4 times. Same thing with .40 caliber. Competitive shooters often times simply pick up brass and reload it multiple times. When it's brass and not nickel, you can often tell when it's once fired.. At that point, it's a very safe bet that everything else has been reloaded easily 2-3 times already.

in general, if you resize it properly, meaning FULLY resize it, it's not a problem in any of the calibers. It's prudent to be cautious, but not paranoid.. as being paranoid is simply being paranoid. Sizing your brass is one part of the system. You may not understand every step of the process, but regardless, you still need to get it right. Things like OAL, how much and what type of powder you're using, the type of gun Glock vs non-glock, caliber ..etc etc. all come into play when running safe reloads. Getting any one of these wrong is often unforgiving and can have dire consequences.

It's easy to make safe, reliable, and accurate ammo- It's just that it's even easier to make ammo that will destroy your gun and possibly cause bodily harm.

Corbin Dallas
06-24-2010, 6:20 AM
Good day to all,

I have been eyeing Glocks for awhile now, and I particularly like the Glock 17, 19, & 21-SF. My problem is that I own two 1911s, which are fantastic shooters, and come/came standard since the beginning of their production with SUPPORTED FIRING CHAMBERS.

I hope I'm not stirring up a hornets' nest with this one, but how important is the "less" supported chamber of Glocks when it comes to reloading ammo? I ask because I reload .45 for my 1911s which saves me a great deal of money and produces my special loads which are full power factor and tremendously accurate.

I've seen the "horror" stories on the internet that includes pictures and paragraphs upon paragraphs of how Glocks tend to warp brass, when even fired just once from a Glock... Not good for a reloader.

If anybody with some real true experience(s) on Glock shooting combined with regular reloading can chime in, it'd be shmaaaantastic.

Thanks,

R.I.

How about this...

I reload these for my "unsupported" G21.

5.5g W231 coa-1.125 230g RN

and YES they work fine.

and NO I'm not crazy...

http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/qq324/AdamJGreenberg/Weapons/IMG_1523.jpg

Rock_Islander
06-24-2010, 7:00 AM
Corbin... Youre reloading steel cased ammo?

Rule .308
06-24-2010, 7:16 AM
They look aluminum to me.

This sucker is a little on the spendy side but it will completely size your brass. It does require and extra step in your reloading process but it is pretty slick. It stuffs the entire piece of brass through a carbide ring.

http://magmaengineering.com/products/case-master-jr-rimless-case-sizer

Corbin Dallas
06-24-2010, 7:25 AM
Corbin... Youre reloading steel cased ammo?

CCI blazer aluminum 1x. Only loaded 1 time by me then left behind where ever I shoot.

TMC
06-24-2010, 7:28 AM
Corbin... Youre reloading steel cased ammo?

Those look like Blazer aluminum cases

sammy
06-24-2010, 1:34 PM
Corbon Dallas, you are braver than me. I thought I was clever loading small primered .45acp brass but that takes it to a whole other level. Just be careful. I have seen lots of case failures or "leaks" for a lack of a better word in CCI aluminum cases but only in .40. They were small and I doubt the shooter even noticed but case failures none the less.

I happily load for all my Glocks. Most of them have never seen a factory round. I have a KKM barrel for my G20 and that is just to perserve the expensive brass. My G17,19 and 34's all have factory barrels and have never had a problem loading for them. I did have a buddy blow up a G17 recently. It was a case failure. He has no idea how many times the brass was loaded but now loads 3 times and throws the stuff out. Glock put it together with a new frame for under $250.00.

What Just Happened?
06-24-2010, 2:02 PM
I have personally seen someone's G34 get a KB. I wish I had kept the brass. I suspect that it was because the range were we shot (and he picked up brass) was after a USPSA match where 9mm major is very popular.

If you are going to reload brass from a glock, I'd probably toss out brass that has a pronounced glock smile. Another point of consideration I've heard is that glocks tend to have looser chamber dimensions and that might cause some problems if you are switching the ammo between your G21 and 1911's.

arfan66
06-24-2010, 2:21 PM
Civilsnake hit it on the head. I'm asking about that exact problem of bulging and deformation that occurs (or possibly occurs) to once or more fired Glock shot brass. If brass is damaged in such a way it could lead to the famous Kaboom at one point or another from that piece of brass.

Like I said, I like Glocks, but I MUST reload. Safely. If its truly an issue then I may consider another polymer frame pistol for my needs.

- I've reloaded alot of 9mm brass fired from factory Glock 17/19 barrels with absolutely no issues whatsoever. YMMV.

Jeff

Corbin Dallas
06-24-2010, 4:45 PM
Corbon Dallas, you are braver than me. I thought I was clever loading small primered .45acp brass but that takes it to a whole other level. Just be careful. I have seen lots of case failures or "leaks" for a lack of a better word in CCI aluminum cases but only in .40. They were small and I doubt the shooter even noticed but case failures none the less.

I happily load for all my Glocks. Most of them have never seen a factory round. I have a KKM barrel for my G20 and that is just to perserve the expensive brass. My G17,19 and 34's all have factory barrels and have never had a problem loading for them. I did have a buddy blow up a G17 recently. It was a case failure. He has no idea how many times the brass was loaded but now loads 3 times and throws the stuff out. Glock put it together with a new frame for under $250.00.

I'm at 2000+ with CCI blazer and no problems. I only use the 'brass' once so it's not really an issue for me. I will NEVER load alum 40, 10 or 357sig. NO way, NO how... Case pressures are FAR too high for me to even consider it.

I've loaded 9mm over and over again. If the brass looks bad or sounds wierd, I toss it. Same goes for 40, 10 and 357sig.

DannyZRC
06-24-2010, 7:38 PM
I think you'll be fine reloading .45 ACP fired from a standard glock barrel.

just be dilligent when you inspect the brass, you'll probably run into a case or two now and again that have visible deformation.

it's not like it'll be pumping out every casing in an unusable state. if it were so, you'd have heard as much in this thread by now.

maybe only load hot practice loads into new or once fired brass.

I'm sure you'll be fine ;)

MarioS
06-24-2010, 8:02 PM
Not the best idea. At that point the brass is weakened. Exposing it to chamber pressures again is just asking for trouble..

Interesting. I've never used one of those myself but people say it's supposed to make it better. That would be quite funny if it made it worse. Either way, I've reloaded Glocked .40S&W brass (with the worst bulge out of any caliber fired out of a Glock barrel) and it's been fine.

Rock_Islander
06-24-2010, 9:06 PM
Thanks for input fellas. I'm still undecided on Glocks as of yet. The 1911's got me accustomed to picking up brass that looks like it hasn't changed structurally at all.

Corbin Dallas
06-25-2010, 6:01 AM
Thanks for input fellas. I'm still undecided on Glocks as of yet. The 1911's got me accustomed to picking up brass that looks like it hasn't changed structurally at all.

Honestly if you're that concerned about the brass, I suggest leaving all brass on the floor and buying only new brass.

Once ANY brass has been fired out of a gun it is structurally different from new brass.

GSG222
06-25-2010, 8:35 AM
I don't reload for glock, but I would say go for it. Just pay extra attention and throw out anything that doesn't look right. A spent case is always weakened somewhat and it's your call to determine when it's enough. I know a guy who reloads his 45 ACP case up to 20x and never has a problem; but he was meticulous in quality control. I examined my spent case from glock26 and didn't see anything alarming. I would feel confident reloading it 2-3x. But that's me.

Lastly, and I think it's important, I hate cool summer and I don't believe global warming. I know it's off track; but many postings in this thread are anyways...

Happy shooting!

mif_slim
06-25-2010, 8:49 AM
I have 600 or so glock brass and I've notice the bulge but it didn't matter much after resizing. The only concern it that that part of the brass migth give out sooner then usual.

civilsnake
06-25-2010, 9:01 AM
Again, for 9mm I wouldn't worry about it.

glockman19
06-25-2010, 9:20 AM
Okay you guys keep mentioning "kaboom", but that's not what the OP is asking about.

.45acp Glocks are rumored to be "hard on brass", meaning that they supposedly can cause bulging and deformation in a small area near the case rim due to the fact that the underside of the cartridge is not fully contained in the chamber; there is a section where the feed ramp cuts into the bottom of the chamber allowing for more reliable loading.

The 9mm doesn't apparently have the same problem because the narrower cartridge doesn't have issues with binding up like the .45acp does.

He's concerned with the brass being unusable, not a kaboom.

At least that's what I gathered.

This is the answer I would give.

Go get the 17 or 19 with confidence.

THT
06-25-2010, 10:30 AM
I reload .45 using brass that was put through my Glock 21SF and I don't have any issues.

stormvet
06-25-2010, 1:54 PM
1911s are buy far my fav. handguns and I own several. I also have been reloading .45 acp, .40, 9mm, 38/357 for years.

I also own 2 .40 Glocks a 22 and 27. I shoot my reloaded .40s. I will say that I am more concerned with KB's in my Glocks then any other gun I own, they do have large chambers(very large). But I trust my reloads, I do wear gloves when I shoot my Glocks much more often then with my other handguns.

I say go ahead and get a Glock or two, they are fine weapons. If you are using a good sizing die I would not be too concerned with the bulged casings. As long as you inspect your used brass and use care when reloading you will be fine.

SVRider
06-25-2010, 6:11 PM
People suggest to use EGW undersized dies to reload Glock brass. These dies are size a little smaller and also size lower on the case:

http://egw-guns.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=40&products_id=40

Rock_Islander
06-26-2010, 4:52 PM
Like I said, doesn't sound too "promising" as far as me and Glocks are concerned (so far). I'm going to search for other polymer pistols as soon as I am ready.

ty.
07-05-2010, 3:34 PM
I have owned many guns and the one Brand that I have not had any problems with has been my GLOCKS. I have owned many types of 1911 pistols, Smith & Wesson 4500 series pistols Sig's and even H&K that clearly states you can use +P and +P+ loads which I have Blown up my USP 9 with factory +P+. As for my S&W4506 and a Colt 1911 I have cracked a rail and a frame with factory Remington Golden Saber 185 +P ammo. So I know that Glocks are not the only ones that have blown up.