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MANNYSAR
06-22-2010, 9:59 PM
I'm thinking of getting a revolver particularly a taurus 605 357 mag.What do you guys think about that pistol? Info would be cool guys .

checkenbach
06-22-2010, 10:24 PM
See Taurus woes thread above yours for the answer. On the other hand, I have a model 66 that's a great shooter after I swapped a few springs. I inherited mine.

audiopro74
06-22-2010, 10:33 PM
My girl bought one of these recently. No complaints. Shoots nice, well built. Changed the grip to a hogue, and it made .357's much more manageable. Holds nice grouping at 7-15 yds. Never actually tried it out further, lets face it, it is a 2 in barell. all in all a great little shooter. Wish it was mine, not hers, and helped me make the decision to buy my tracker .44 mag.

robcoe
06-22-2010, 10:34 PM
I have heard a lot of storys about their timeing getting off, and I have personaly seen it on some display guns.

MANNYSAR
06-22-2010, 10:42 PM
Ive seen other threads I'm wondering if any one has had any experience with this model.Heck some times you get a rotten apple in your basket.

map
06-22-2010, 10:49 PM
I love my revolver. More particularly, I love that it is chambered for both the 357 mag and the 38 special. I have a smith and wesson model 27.

Good luck on your search for a good Taurus. Revolvers are very reliable and you can't go wrong.

GrinderCB
06-22-2010, 10:55 PM
Aside from complaints that individuals may have, Taurus revolvers seem to have a general tendency toward rough, heavy trigger pulls. For a solid .357 snub, I'd save the money just a little while longer and get a Ruger GP100.

twotap
06-23-2010, 12:24 AM
I did not like the hammer the way it stuck up so I got the 627 4in tracker. No regrets. I have shot lots of rounds thru it without a problem. No rough heavy trigger either. Alittle easier to handle the 357 loads with the 4in ported barrel too.

j1133s
06-23-2010, 12:40 AM
I'm thinking of getting a revolver particularly a taurus 605 357 mag.What do you guys think about that pistol? Info would be cool guys .

Don't know that particular model. If it is a new manufacture Taurus, they've got a good reputation as a solid revolver that'll last.

The question is why (assuming you're shooting semi-autos already)? Revolvers are a real pain to clean and they aren't all that accurate. Just trying to prevent you from later selling it at a lose.

randy
06-23-2010, 12:47 AM
There is plenty of posts on here of people liking and hating Taurus products. I've seen too many with problems out of the box to ever buy a Taurus product.

Bent cranes out of the box, out of time etc.

I'm of the mind when it comes to revolvers Smith then Ruger and Colt. If I were going to buy one for a safe queen it would be a Colt, well it would be another Colt.

bjl333
06-23-2010, 12:55 AM
My girl bought one of these recently. No complaints. Shoots nice, well built. Changed the grip to a hogue, and it made .357's much more manageable. Holds nice grouping at 7-15 yds. Never actually tried it out further, lets face it, it is a 2 in barell. all in all a great little shooter. Wish it was mine, not hers, and helped me make the decision to buy my tracker .44 mag.



Chris, my dad have the Tracker 44 and he had to send it back to Taurus because the cylinder wouldnt turn after a few shots. He had to send it back to Taurus 2 times to get it fixed. If I am not mistaken the Tracker is build by Rossi and sold under the Taurus name, since they are the same company.

Edit: There is another Thread around here with a Taurus 44 story.

picasso
06-23-2010, 12:59 AM
Aside from complaints that individuals may have, Taurus revolvers seem to have a general tendency toward rough, heavy trigger pulls. For a solid .357 snub, I'd save the money just a little while longer and get a Ruger GP100.

The Ruger also has the Triple-Locking Cylinder to ensure perfect alignment everytime.

bjl333
06-23-2010, 12:59 AM
I'm thinking of getting a revolver particularly a taurus 605 357 mag.What do you guys think about that pistol? Info would be cool guys .



If you could go with a Smith and Wesson revolver, that would be the ideal choice. I've had/shot S&W revolvers for over 30yrs. I've never had a single problem with any of them.

1JimMarch
06-23-2010, 1:43 AM
Here's my actual experience with a Taurus 605:

http://www.thehighroad.us/showthread.php?t=407774

Read the whole thread. DO NOT even think about it. Not for a gun you're going to trust your butt to.

Any Ruger is 10x the gun any Taurus is, if not moreso.

BigDogatPlay
06-23-2010, 8:31 AM
Revolvers are a real pain to clean and they aren't all that accurate.

I call shenanigans...... neither of these statements are true.

For the OP... Taurus revolvers seem to be hit and miss for quality out of the box. I've seen good ones and I've seen some real duds, including one I owned that was a complete POS.

As others have recommended, if you want a good, basic revolver that goes bang every time and for a good price, buy a Ruger. If you want to spend more money for an even better revolver, save up some dough and buy a Smith & Wesson, preferably a pre-lock model.

Z ME FLY
06-23-2010, 8:58 AM
Don't know that particular model. If it is a new manufacture Taurus, they've got a good reputation as a solid revolver that'll last.

The question is why (assuming you're shooting semi-autos already)? Revolvers are a real pain to clean and they aren't all that accurate. Just trying to prevent you from later selling it at a lose.

Wow major FUD here... First the newer Taurus revolvers do not have a good rep as a solid revolver that'll last. If anything the OLDER revolvers have a better rep than the newer ones but that isn't saying much.

Revolvers are a real pain to clean? Really? Have you cleaned one before? It's pretty darn simple, probably easier than a semi since you just open the cylinder. Revolvers are pretty accurate so maybe there is something wrong with your shooting technique? I use to shoot jugs of water off the hill of Panoche with my S&W610 and hit them without a problem. They are probably a good 50 yrds away at least.

nn3453
06-23-2010, 8:58 AM
Don't know that particular model. If it is a new manufacture Taurus, they've got a good reputation as a solid revolver that'll last.

The question is why (assuming you're shooting semi-autos already)? Revolvers are a real pain to clean and they aren't all that accurate. Just trying to prevent you from later selling it at a lose.

Not sure if you are serious or being sarcastic. Any factory $600 S&W revolver will outshoot most semi autos until you start spending big bucks and head into the match/elite/custom range of semi autos.

Most people would say that revolvers are easier to clean as well. Just brush and run a patch through the bore and cylinders. No slides to take down, clean and lube, guide rods to deal with, feed ramps to clean, etc. Again, not sure if you are serious.

As the guys said, stay away from Taurus. Don't have the dough? Look for a used Ruger.

ScottB
06-23-2010, 9:04 AM
I love my revolvers - and i have lots of semis too.

If I were you, I'd look at a good used (not abused) S&W. I wouldn't get hung up on the lock issue. I think its largely an argument in search of a problem. The older Model 19's and 27's are awesome .357's but the newer ones are extremely good as well. My preference would be for a 6" barrel for general use. I see them for sale on this site fairly often. In a single action, I would look at the Ruger Blackhawk. My S&W M19 (.357) and Stealth Hunter (.44 mag) are a joy to shoot and very, very, accurate. Personally, I think revolvers are easier to clean and lube as there is no disassembly required.

Z ME FLY
06-23-2010, 9:05 AM
Not sure if you are serious or being sarcastic. Any factory $600 S&W revolver will outshoot most semi autos until you start spending big bucks and head into the match/elite/custom range of semi autos.

Most people would say that revolvers are easier to clean as well. Just brush and run a patch through the bore and cylinders. No slides to take down, clean and lube, guide rods to deal with, feed ramps to clean, etc. Again, not sure if you are serious.

As the guys said, stay away from Taurus. Don't have the dough? Look for a used Ruger.

Don't forget about my favorites... COLT!!!

You can find a early Colt Trooper for like $450! That's a deal considering the trigger pull on it is SWEEETTT! Everyone who has shot my revolver, after the first couple of shots always say... WOW the friggin trigger is sweet!

ScottB
06-23-2010, 9:08 AM
The older Colts are very nice as well. I didn't mention them because they always seem a bit overpriced to me, the Pythons and Anacondas in particular. But at the right price, I'd buy one in a heartbeat.

Marlin Hunter
06-23-2010, 9:10 AM
I'm thinking of getting a revolver particularly a taurus 605 357 mag.What do you guys think about that pistol? Info would be cool guys .


I do not know anything about that model, but I can tell you what I think about Taurus. You never know what you will get when you buy a Taurus. You can have two of the same models one serial number apart, and one can be the most accurate and smoothest gun you ever owned, and the other one can be the biggest piece of junk that feels like the action is filled with rocks and sand. In general and for the most part, they will function and do the job they are suppose to do: i.e. launch a lead projectile in the direction the muzzle is pointing.

Here are some examples I have seen. They are not all mine:

1)Taurus PT-945 .45 ACP ~ The barrel bore was .456 when all other .45 ACPs are .451 to .4515. 45 ACP bullets measure .452, so there is a .004 gap for gas to escape. Gun still shoots good.

2) Taurus Raging Bull 454 ~ Barrel bore was .454, but the cylinder throats measured .452. The bullet gets squeezed down to .452 before it enters the barrel. The throats should be slightly larger than the bore.

3) Taurus 41 Mag 2-1/2 barrel ~ cocking the hammer or pulling the trigger in double action felt like the gun was filled with rocks and sand. Gun was sent back to Taurus and was improved, but still felt like it was full of sand.

4) Taurus 85 38 special ~ Side plate cracked and gun would not function after about 50 rounds were fired. Gun was sent back to Taurus, and was fixed. Gun still works good after 20 years.

I like Taurus and would buy another one, but don't expect S&W, or Colt performance.

Z ME FLY
06-23-2010, 9:13 AM
The older Colts are very nice as well. I didn't mention them because they always seem a bit overpriced to me, the Pythons and Anacondas in particular. But at the right price, I'd buy one in a heartbeat.

Early Colt Trooper= same trigger as the mighty Python.. sometimes called the poor man's python :)

So yes the colt trooper WITHOUT the ejector shroud is well worth the $450-500 you will spend

sargenv
06-23-2010, 9:15 AM
After having a GP100 for a number of years.. I went ahead and picked up a S&W.. and I haven't really looked back. Now my GP100 is the safe queen and the S&W's I own get all of the play time.. Better triggers, accuracy, and just general ease of use. It was probably wise that I bought the Ruger being a new reloader and all.. but now that I've tamed down my lust of hotter than factory +P ammo, I'm quite happy shooting the S&W's that I own.. particularly the 610 that has become my favorite. I already owned two other 40's so the 610 seemed natural since with moon clips you can use either the 40 S&W or the full size 10 mm's in it. Right now S&W is ofering the 610 in the shorter 3 7/8" and the longr 6 1/2" tube, but it is an N frame so it's a lot of gun.. and likely heavier than most people like. But it is still my favorite.. with medium power 10's and 40's, it recoils less than comparable medium framed 357's with comparable loads.

My competition 610 is a -2 model that only had minimal work done to it. By the time I had it worked on it likely had over 30,000 rounds through it and was already smoothed out. I had the cylinders chamfered, the hammer bobbed, and a trigger stop installed.. it is my go to revo for USPSA and even for ICORE where the dominant gun is an 8 shot N frame 627. I do not feel at all at a disadvantage.. I actually shoot my 5" 627 worse than that 610.

Marlin Hunter
06-23-2010, 9:19 AM
Most people would say that revolvers are easier to clean as well. Just brush and run a patch through the bore and cylinders. No slides to take down, clean and lube, guide rods to deal with, feed ramps to clean, etc. Again, not sure if you are serious.



I have seen people (mostly women) bring their semi-autos to the gun shop in pieces because they couldn't get it back together after taking it apart to clean. That is one reason why my first recommendation for a handgun is a revolver. You would be surprised at the number of people with PhD's and Masters degrees that can't even change their own engine oil, let-alone put a semi-auto handgun back together.

slobson
06-23-2010, 9:19 AM
I do not know anything about that model, but I can tell you what I think about Taurus. You never know what you will get when you buy a Taurus. You can have two of the same models one serial number apart, and one can be the most accurate and smoothest gun you ever owned, and the other one can be the biggest piece of junk that feels like the action is filled with rocks and sand. In general and for the most part, they will function and do the job they are suppose to do: i.e. launch a lead projectile in the direction the muzzle is pointing.

Here are some examples I have seen. They are not all mine:

1)Taurus PT-945 .45 ACP ~ The barrel bore was .456 when all other .45 ACPs are .451 to .4515. 45 ACP bullets measure .452, so there is a .004 gap for gas to escape. Gun still shoots good.

2) Taurus Raging Bull 454 ~ Barrel bore was .454, but the cylinder throats measured .452. The bullet gets squeezed down to .452 before it enters the barrel. The throats should be slightly larger than the bore.

3) Taurus 41 Mag 2-1/2 barrel ~ cocking the hammer or pulling the trigger in double action felt like the gun was filled with rocks and sand. Gun was sent back to Taurus and was improved, but still felt like it was full of sand.

4) Taurus 85 38 special ~ Side plate cracked and gun would not function after about 50 rounds were fired. Gun was sent back to Taurus, and was fixed. Gun still works good after 20 years.

I like Taurus and would buy another one, but don't expect S&W, or Colt performance.

:iagree: well said sir

paul0660
06-23-2010, 9:21 AM
Read the whole thread. DO NOT even think about it.

I read the whole thread Jim. What's up with the replacement 605 they sent you?

So yeah, I'm happy. This would make a nice basic personal defense piece.

sevensix2x51
06-23-2010, 9:23 AM
i only have one revolver, so im probably not the best to judge, but if you can find one, the ruger security six is indestructible. smooth trigger, transfer bar so you can practice dry firing, accurate, and will withstand an accidental double loaded .357 cartridge (dont ask me how i know :eek: ). best $200 i ever spent.

dfletcher
06-23-2010, 9:47 AM
Don't know that particular model. If it is a new manufacture Taurus, they've got a good reputation as a solid revolver that'll last.

The question is why (assuming you're shooting semi-autos already)? Revolvers are a real pain to clean and they aren't all that accurate. Just trying to prevent you from later selling it at a lose.

My friend's Les Baer 1911 is about the most centerfire semi auto I've played with - it's damn near as accurate as my old 6.5" Smith 25. ;)

And how is a revolver a pain to clean compared to a semi auto? You don't have to disassemble the darn thing, you don't have to clean the trigger internals as you do with a semi or springs or rails. The inside of 1 barrel and chambers and that's it.

Black Majik
06-23-2010, 9:54 AM
I would say this is the time to pick up a revolver... a used revolver. There are so many good deals going on right now it is not even funny.

Instead of a new Taurus, I'm sure you can pick up a used Smith or Ruger in a similar price range.

RedFord150
06-23-2010, 10:02 AM
I'm thinking of getting a revolver particularly a taurus 605 357 mag.What do you guys think about that pistol? Info would be cool guys .

I own Rugers. My GP100 is the toughest thing ever built. After a good trigger job, it is smoother than a factory S&W. I personally think it is just as nice as a Colt Python trigger. I still own a Speed Six in .38. Except for Hogue Grips, it is stone stock. After 20 years, I would not sell it for anything. I started with a Security Six that I sold to buy the GP100. Never had a complaint, I just liked the GP better.
I have never owned an S&W. However, I have never met an owner who was not satisfied. My favorite gunsmith once told me he could tune the S&W trigger to make it better than anything I would ever shoot.
I bought my Son a Colt Trooper. I think it was made in the 70's. I would trust my life to it in a Heartbeat.
I have owned one Taurus. It is now gone and I will never buy another. I would NEVER trust my life to a Taurus. As many have already said, buying a Taurus always comes with a surprise.
As always, it is your money. You can spend it anyway you like. I personally see no reason to gamble on a Taurus with so many good reliable alternatives.
FTR, the Ruger will be cheaper than the S&W. The Colt will be used and possibly not so easy to find, especially in CA.
Good luck.

j1133s
06-23-2010, 11:01 AM
My friend's Les Baer 1911 is about the most centerfire semi auto I've played with - it's damn near as accurate as my old 6.5" Smith 25. ;)

And how is a revolver a pain to clean compared to a semi auto? You don't have to disassemble the darn thing, you don't have to clean the trigger internals as you do with a semi or springs or rails. The inside of 1 barrel and chambers and that's it.

It's a given fact that revolvers aren't going to be as accurate as a semi-auto due to its design. For accruacy you'd want s consistent a shot as possible, w/ a revolver you've got an extra cylinder to barrel gap. Another accuracy contribution is trigger as you'll be shooting a pistol offhand.

And definitely revolvers are most difficult to clean. Each cylinder hole has to be scrubed, you'd should use a boresnake or you'll 1. clean the bore opposite way and 2. hit your breach/pin one of those days, keeping the front of the cylinder new looking is nearly impossible, and forget about the fixed cylinder ones.

I'm not a fan of revolvers and I only got them for competitions. But I've shot a ton of them, thousands of rounds. And as for Taurus revolvers, they are cheap, but as I've said before, the newers (8 years or newer) ones have a good reputation. Taurus revolvers is the ones we recommend to new competitors who wants to spend < $300 and still get something that works.

An above poster mentioned the Tracker is made by Rossi. This I've never heard before, but Rossi was purchased by Taurus some time ago... but the Tracker (which is pretty good) is a Rossi gun?? Anyway, I don't own any Taurus guns so I never did any research, just from conversations w/ fellow shooters. So I only can comment on Taurus's rep.

DDG
06-23-2010, 11:13 AM
By now you should realize the Taurus will be a "hit or miss" proposition. If you get one, buy from a reputable dealer that may be able to help if you have to send it back for any work. Many have had great guns from Taurus. Some have had real lemons. If you get a good one, it is a great deal.

Personally, I actually waited until I could afford the Ruger GP100.

FYI – It is a quicker/easier cleaning job than my Beretta 92FS.

j1133s
06-23-2010, 11:20 AM
Wow major FUD here... First the newer Taurus revolvers do not have a good rep as a solid revolver that'll last. If anything the OLDER revolvers have a better rep than the newer ones but that isn't saying much.

Revolvers are a real pain to clean? Really? Have you cleaned one before? It's pretty darn simple, probably easier than a semi since you just open the cylinder. Revolvers are pretty accurate so maybe there is something wrong with your shooting technique? I use to shoot jugs of water off the hill of Panoche with my S&W610 and hit them without a problem. They are probably a good 50 yrds away at least.

Hey there, you're in the east bay, I'm not far from you, just across the dumbarton bridge.

I used to shoot clay birds (~4") at 40 meter w/ ~30% success w/ my combat semi-auto, then I decimate the pieces w/ a .22LR semi auto. Offhand of course. Frankly I think I can do that w/ a revolver too, but I'm just saying that's got more to do w/ your skills than a gun's accuracy (as 4" at 4m is not too much beyond even a combat pistol).

The S&W 610 is certainly a nice gun. Bring it and join me at Reed's next Monday and we'll have some fun. I've been going ot the range very often these days, and I'd love to meet up more calgunners.

remsenlab
06-23-2010, 11:59 AM
I just replaced my old Taurus .357 with a Ruger GP100 and am thrilled with the improvement. The Taurus was definitely not of recent vintage (probably about 15 years old) but it had been falling apart for years. I finally bit the bullet and got the GP100 when I was out turkey hunting this spring and eyed a mt lion looking for me. I unholstered the Taurus, swung out the cylinder to make sure I had the right loads in and the damn cylinder dropped to the ground (broken piece in there somewhere). The GP100 is a brick ****house, in all the right ways. And if you act fast, there's a bunch of them listed as available at the Gallery of Guns (http://www.galleryofguns.com/genie/default.aspx?pg=list&mfg=Ruger&mdl=GP100&cat=1&type=Revolver&cal=All&fin=All&sit=All&zipcode=94506). It's pretty rare to see them in stock anywhere, let alone the dozens that are there on GoG...I bought mine through them and got a good price and no problems with the local delivery through Dom's in Livermore.

dfletcher
06-23-2010, 12:17 PM
It's a given fact that revolvers aren't going to be as accurate as a semi-auto due to its design. For accruacy you'd want s consistent a shot as possible, w/ a revolver you've got an extra cylinder to barrel gap. Another accuracy contribution is trigger as you'll be shooting a pistol offhand.

And definitely revolvers are most difficult to clean. Each cylinder hole has to be scrubed, you'd should use a boresnake or you'll 1. clean the bore opposite way and 2. hit your breach/pin one of those days, keeping the front of the cylinder new looking is nearly impossible, and forget about the fixed cylinder ones.

I'm not a fan of revolvers and I only got them for competitions. But I've shot a ton of them, thousands of rounds. And as for Taurus revolvers, they are cheap, but as I've said before, the newers (8 years or newer) ones have a good reputation. Taurus revolvers is the ones we recommend to new competitors who wants to spend < $300 and still get something that works.

An above poster mentioned the Tracker is made by Rossi. This I've never heard before, but Rossi was purchased by Taurus some time ago... but the Tracker (which is pretty good) is a Rossi gun?? Anyway, I don't own any Taurus guns so I never did any research, just from conversations w/ fellow shooters. So I only can comment on Taurus's rep.

The challenge with revolver accuracy (assuming a well made brand) is not barrel to cylinder gap but rather the difficulty in manufacturing of lining up six cylinders to the one barrel. The revolver has a fixed barrel, no slide play to the frame and no barrel play to a slide, no barrel bushing. There are as many mechanical reasons for a semi to not be as inherently accurate as a revolver.

So far as triggers are concerned, I think the Smith SA beats nearly any SA semi auto centerfire and the SA pull on most SA/DA semi auto handguns are not very good - much creep and travel and an overall "spongy" feel. I would come close to throwing in Colt and Ruger too with respect to having better SA pulls than SA/DA semi auto pistols. Some 1911s, Smith 52 and 745s can have a very nice trigger pull I agree, but as a general statement I think SA revolver trigger pulls are better. Again, on average and I would exclude rimfire in that statement - some SA semi auto 22s have excellent triggers.

So far as ease of cleaning and for the reasons mentioned I think the revolver is easier. May be messier scrubbing the cylinder but I think it's less time consuming. I've never used a boresnake on a revolver cylinder though - maybe a barrel or two though. I don't quite follow on hitting the recoil plate during cleaning - I swing out my DA revolver cylinder or remove it from a SA revolver.

Regarding the Tracker, I believe it is made by Taurus, Taurus owns Rossi. Which entity does what down there, I don't know, but if I were to attribute which plant or part of the company or on what "assembly line" it's made I'd say Taurus.

Z ME FLY
06-23-2010, 12:20 PM
Hey there, you're in the east bay, I'm not far from you, just across the dumbarton bridge.

I used to shoot clay birds (~4") at 40 meter w/ ~30% success w/ my combat semi-auto, then I decimate the pieces w/ a .22LR semi auto. Offhand of course. Frankly I think I can do that w/ a revolver too, but I'm just saying that's got more to do w/ your skills than a gun's accuracy (as 4" at 4m is not too much beyond even a combat pistol).

The S&W 610 is certainly a nice gun. Bring it and join me at Reed's next Monday and we'll have some fun. I've been going ot the range very often these days, and I'd love to meet up more calgunners.

Thanks for the invite :) But sadly I had to sell the 610 when I lost my job. I sold my glock and another revolver before I sold this one so I was trying to keep it. Now I only have my trusty Colt Trooper! When I go shooting it's usually BLM land only since ranges are okay but just aren't as fun.

BigDogatPlay
06-23-2010, 1:46 PM
It's a given fact that revolvers aren't going to be as accurate as a semi-auto due to its design. For accruacy you'd want s consistent a shot as possible, w/ a revolver you've got an extra cylinder to barrel gap. Another accuracy contribution is trigger as you'll be shooting a pistol offhand.

Again.... shenanigans. Please post some factual information that proves your assertion.

The revolver has a fixed barrel. The cylinder barrel gap has no appreciable impact on accuracy over all. It is merely a gas escape point, and even at that you can generate far more power out of a revolver than you could just about any practical semi-auto.

As to the trigger, you'd be surprised just how well some people can shoot with a double action revolver pulling it all the way through. In single action, it is same same as the semi, and usually with a crisper pull and far less over travel.

Nearly all semi-autos save for straight blowback guns have a barrel that is moved mechanically as part of it's action. Unless you've got an NM bushing in the front of a race gun with so little play that the gun is barely functional, you will have play in the front end. You will also have play, to some degree, at the locking lugs. That is an inherent inconsistency in barrel lock up to some degree (minor or major) shot to shot. Then let's get into the play in the slide and rails.

Out of the box I believe that nearly any quality revolver will shoot more accurately than any out of the box quality semi given a reasonably competent shooter. Take race guns and customization out of the equation and either platform is, generally, more accurate than the shooter.

FWIW, I've laid rounds onto paper and reactive targets at far greater distances using revolvers than I have with semi-autos. Gallon milk jugs full of water at 100 yards with a 2.5 inch Model 19 and +P duty ammo comes to mind. Never been able to match that with any of my semis consistently.

Rekrab
06-23-2010, 2:21 PM
OP, save some more pennies and get a Ruger. Built like a tank, easy to shoot, and awesome warranty service you'll never need.

Hell, I've been wanting to pick up an SP101 but with the way .357 and .38spl ammo costs these days I just can't justify it.

nn3453
06-23-2010, 2:53 PM
Again.... shenanigans. Please post some factual information that proves your assertion.


+1.

Every distance shooter I've met who shot for accuracy either had a very highly modified top end semi-auto or a revolver with some trigger work at most.

This is the first time I have heard that semi-autos are inherently more accurate.

As far as DA shots, it depends on the shooter. You have to learn to work a revolver trigger. Most seasoned revolver shooters will outshoot most seasoned semi-auto shooters in terms of pure accuracy almost any day of the week. I own both, but I haven't yet heard of or seen an off the shelf S&W or Colt that shot worse than an off the shelf sub $1k semi-auto.

wamphyri13
06-23-2010, 3:05 PM
I am a gun owner. I have pistols and revolvers. I have, or have had, many of the brands listed. Here are my opinions.
1)The Taurus 605 is a cute little gun. I think it would be fine for low round count home self defense. I do not fully trust Taurus. I have a .40S&W PT-101 that was a paperweight for almost a year trying to get repairs made. Adjustable rear sights came apart while shooting. Free replacement from Taurus. (YAY!) Send them the slide. Did that. Slide comes back and won't work with factory guide rod. From my generation to the at then current generation guns, there were some dimensional changes. Took over 9 months to get a replacement guide rod. I have a PT-99 in 9mm with adjustable sights as well. I won't shoot either of them. I won't sell either of them either because I bought them before the hi-cap mag ban and I have LOTS of mags. Also have a Taurus 431 that's built like the Rugers. Tough as hell without a problem. .44 special caliber.
2)Ruger. Comparable size to the 605 is the SP101. Built like a tank. Firm, solid and enjoyable to shoot .357magnums IF you add the Hogue grips. The only reason I sold my 3" model was my friend wanted it for his wife. Would have no qualms about getting another one. GP100. Full size .357magnum tank. Gun is big, heavy, solid as a tank, but a joy to shoot. True, triggers aren't as smooth as S&W, but with a little love and a LOT of dry firing, they smooth out quite nicely. Just sold my 6" on Calguns to buy my new 4" S&W 620. Nice trigger. Again, no qualms about ever aquiring another GP100.

If I were you, I would look into the J-frame S&W's, or the Ruger SP101 if you want a small revo. Or step up to the K or L frame S&W's or GP100. As a last resort, go to the N frame S&W's. I only say as a last resort because of their size. Not everyone has big hands or like holding up large frame guns. If your small of stature or have small hands, last choice would be an N frame.

On a side note... I find revolvers easier to shoot, more accurate, and easier to clean. The second to best time I've had shooting was .44specials from the Taurus revolver. Those big, heavy, slow slugs, with no slide recoil, was just rreally a lot of fun to shoot. Can't wait to break in my S&W 25-2. I love shooting .45ACP from my 1911's, so having no slide recoil should be an absolute blast. The most fun I've ever had shooting was my friends 1958 Beretta Panther in .25 That was a lot of fun. Tiny little gun, tiny little recoil, but not tiny little fun.
Ryan

elSquid
06-23-2010, 4:35 PM
And definitely revolvers are most difficult to clean. Each cylinder hole has to be scrubed, you'd should use a boresnake or you'll 1. clean the bore opposite way and 2. hit your breach/pin one of those days, keeping the front of the cylinder new looking is nearly impossible, and forget about the fixed cylinder ones.

Other have addressed most of the issues, but I'll speak up about this one. Pulling the base pin and dropping the cylinder on a single action revolver is quick and easy to do...I can remove the cylinder from the frame on my Ruger SA faster than I can describe how to do it. Literally takes a few seconds.

-- Michael

j1133s
06-23-2010, 5:21 PM
Lots of semi autos have fixed barrel too, and those barrels and chamber are made w/ 1 piece of metal. Even 1911s, which aren't what you'd say an accurate design can be made pretty accurate w/ 1.5" @ 50yd guarranty.

Once you take trigger into account, the single action trigger can only increase accuracy. Granted there are single action revolvers, but shooting them generally require you to reacquire your hold each shot (or even your stance) which also affect accuracy negatively.

Sub-$1K, you can definitely get a more accurate semi-auto.

MANNYSAR
06-23-2010, 5:25 PM
Decisions decisions I think I'm having second thoughts on taurus .

missiondude
06-23-2010, 5:31 PM
Did not read all the replys, but you being a semi auto shooter, look into a moonclip revo in 10mm/40 or 45 ACP. You give up very little in terms of reload time vice an auto, and shoot the same ammo. I think revolvers are every bit as accurate as most auto loaders. If you can find one in Cali, the S&W 610 is hard to beat. 40 cal for practice, 10mm for HD. Go to a range that rents revos, or find a shooting buddy that will let you fire their guns before you decide. If you are ever in San Diego, you can try mine...

testosteroneOD
06-23-2010, 5:39 PM
Ive had one revolver, a S&W 629 Classic, stainless with a 6.5" barrel. It was fun to shoot but she sat in the safe most of the time. I ended up selling her to fund my Delta Elite. I want another 44 mag as I still have the ammo and I like the classic look and feel of steel. That said, I'm either going with S&W but with a shorter barrel or a Ruger. No Taurus for me.

dfletcher
06-23-2010, 5:40 PM
Lots of semi autos have fixed barrel too, and those barrels and chamber are made w/ 1 piece of metal. Even 1911s, which aren't what you'd say an accurate design can be made pretty accurate w/ 1.5" @ 50yd guarranty.

Once you take trigger into account, the single action trigger can only increase accuracy. Granted there are single action revolvers, but shooting them generally require you to reacquire your hold each shot (or even your stance) which also affect accuracy negatively.

Sub-$1K, you can definitely get a more accurate semi-auto.

What would be an example of a centerfire semi auto having a fixed barrel and better target accuracy than a centerfire revolver?

retired
06-23-2010, 6:17 PM
S&W are the way to go. I have 3 from the 1970s and they have never, ever given me a bit of trouble. Model 66 2 1/2", .357 (1978), Model 60 .38 (1977) and Model 15 .38, 4" barrel (1970 something. My dept. issued revolver in 1976. It was used when I got it, so I'm not sure what year it is)

I bought the Model 15 in 1990, when we went to the Beretta. Very accurate and easy to clean.:D

slobson
06-23-2010, 6:59 PM
I own Rugers. My GP100 is the toughest thing ever built.

second toughest, behind its big brother super redhawk in .357 :D



FWIW, I've laid rounds onto paper and reactive targets at far greater distances using revolvers than I have with semi-autos. Gallon milk jugs full of water at 100 yards with a 2.5 inch Model 19 and +P duty ammo comes to mind. Never been able to match that with any of my semis consistently.

big +1 on this. I'm far from an expert revolver shooter, but hitting 3 ft dingers at 200 yds offhand is not something I could do with a semiauto

nn3453
06-23-2010, 7:07 PM
Sub-$1K, you can definitely get a more accurate semi-auto.

Would like to know which ones. I am willing to put any of my sub 1k wheel guns in a rest versus your choice of a sub 1k semi auto at 25/50 yd.

Z ME FLY
06-23-2010, 7:10 PM
Lots of semi autos have fixed barrel too, and those barrels and chamber are made w/ 1 piece of metal. Even 1911s, which aren't what you'd say an accurate design can be made pretty accurate w/ 1.5" @ 50yd guarranty.

Once you take trigger into account, the single action trigger can only increase accuracy. Granted there are single action revolvers, but shooting them generally require you to reacquire your hold each shot (or even your stance) which also affect accuracy negatively.

Sub-$1K, you can definitely get a more accurate semi-auto.

Not all 1911s are guaranteed to be 1.5" @ 50yrds. Normally those are the near $1K or $1K+ 1911s that are able to do that.

1JimMarch
06-23-2010, 7:43 PM
I read the whole thread Jim. What's up with the replacement 605 they sent you?


Well they didn't - my choice. This was at the high point of the Great Obama Gun Rush. They declared the original gun unfixable and told me they were out of 605s. I said fine, ship me a concealed hammer 38 capable of 38+P. That came in brand new, checked out fine, and I sold it. No more Taurus for me. Ever.

But hey, free gun, what the hell :).

Notblake
06-23-2010, 10:56 PM
I would HIGHLY suggest a Ruger GP100 if you are looking for a GREAT affordable .357 revolver!

j1133s
06-23-2010, 11:52 PM
Would like to know which ones. I am willing to put any of my sub 1k wheel guns in a rest versus your choice of a sub 1k semi auto at 25/50 yd.

Are you in the bay area?

Ok, I'm not usually one to accept any type of challenge, but what the heck. We'll call it a friendly shoot/meet and not any type of comp or challenge.

You take 1 of your sub-$1K revolver and I'll bring a sub-$1K semi-auto and lets do a shoot at 25/50 yards off bench. Once that's taken care of, we'll do some offhand fun shoot. Totally non-scientific but it'll be an opportunity to meet up fellow calgunners.

Any bay area range is fine with me. Right now, I'm going to the range about once per week... so there (hopefully) is enough of a chance for us (and/or others) to meet up and just have some fun.

PS. You (and any others) are also very welcome to shoot my guns. Too bad I recently sold my pistol scope; otherwise, we can have a lot of fun going out to 100yds.

Ultimate
06-24-2010, 12:07 AM
I don't have anything against taurus or the 605. I was looking at one of those myself the other day.

However with the Ruger SP101 being less than 100 dollars away I would save and get the SP101. They are similar revolvers but the SP101 looks like a much higher quality piece it feels and looks more than 100 dollars away. Plus there is much more community support for it. In fact that is what I want to get, a 3 inch SP101 in .357. Just no one has it. But they have the snubby though.

In comparison with the Smith model 60 where it is more expensive than the SP101. It doesn't seem like that much more of a difference in quality. On the contrary I would say the SP101 feels better built.

j1133s
06-24-2010, 12:14 AM
dfletcher , you Calguns Addict, you :) I was just promoted to calgun senior member, but I'm working hard to get into the calgun addict status. This thread is helping...

I see you are in the _bay area_! (Yeah, best place on Earth, just needs a few minor fixes.. like rmoving the earthquake issue, better gun laws, cheaper housing...)

My above post certainly applies to you too. I think meeting other calgunners is pretty fun in itself, and adding some unscientific test results to gunlore is icing on the cake.

You seem very experienced, and I'd be honored to get an opportunity to shoot w/ you and (hopefully) learn a thing or 2. I will bring a bona fide sub-$1k (new, street priced) semi-auto.

(I'm not revealing my gun in the hopes that it'll draw more folks out for a fun shoot. Plus, I don't have bad breath and smell very good, come out and have fun.)

Black Majik
06-24-2010, 12:47 AM
Take pictures. :)

ScottB
06-24-2010, 7:02 AM
Are you in the bay area?

Ok, I'm not usually one to accept any type of challenge, but what the heck. We'll call it a friendly shoot/meet and not any type of comp or challenge.

You take 1 of your sub-$1K revolver and I'll bring a sub-$1K semi-auto and lets do a shoot at 25/50 yards off bench. Once that's taken care of, we'll do some offhand fun shoot. Totally non-scientific but it'll be an opportunity to meet up fellow calgunners.

Any bay area range is fine with me. Right now, I'm going to the range about once per week... so there (hopefully) is enough of a chance for us (and/or others) to meet up and just have some fun.

PS. You (and any others) are also very welcome to shoot my guns. Too bad I recently sold my pistol scope; otherwise, we can have a lot of fun going out to 100yds.

Wish I was near you. Sounds like fun. To make it completely fair, you should switch guns at each event to minimize personal skill of the shooters with the firearm(s) they own.

lazs
06-24-2010, 7:55 AM
j1133s, you are talking hypothetical and mostly unimportant.. A well timed revolver with reasonably like sized chambers will easily outshoot the monkey motion semi auto.

A bad one won't but that is rare.. A revolver has a fixed barrel where the sights are mounted on the same fixed plane. the front sight is on the barrel and the rear on the frame and both are for all practical purposes.. one imovable piece.

Long range shooting is dominated by single shots followed closely by revlovers with semi autos a distant 3rd

bombadillo
06-24-2010, 8:10 AM
I hear a lot of bad things regarding taurus on the boards but in the real world, i've seen a lot of taurus handguns shoot just fine at the range. No, its not a smith or colt, but it seems to be decent quality.

Wherryj
06-24-2010, 8:45 AM
The older Colts are very nice as well. I didn't mention them because they always seem a bit overpriced to me, the Pythons and Anacondas in particular. But at the right price, I'd buy one in a heartbeat.

You aren't kidding. I paid $700 for my Python and that was about 20 years ago. Even that appears to be a bargain considering what they are selling for used these days.

I'm sure glad that I picked one up, however. It is definitely the Bugatti of revolvers-or at least a Spyker..

lazs
06-24-2010, 9:07 AM
Most 38 special revolvers will shoot ragged one hole groups at 25 yards.. a good semi auto will do maybe 2" I have a 1949 smith 38 special that will easily outshoot my Kimber custom eclipse.

Once you get past the mouse gun calibers in semi auto you will not find a fixed barrel.. none of them will have the sights and the barrel connected in any real way and all will be on a different plane every shot.

Semi autos have improved greatly over the last few decades but at a cost.. the cost is in reliability.. the loose and not very accurate semi autos of the past were very reliable but the new ones are tighter and less so. Accuracy is not measured the same way these days. "tactical" accuracy is the new buzzword. which means highly reliable plastic guns will shoot very "accurately" at 7-25 yards.

Long range shooting and hunting are of course dominated by the more powerful and accurate revolvers.

The highly accurate 22 semi autos almost always have a fixed barrel (blowback action) and at least the front sight fixed to it. 22's are very accurate in any case and Smith used to say that a K22 revolver would shoot 1" groups at 50 yards. My K22 is very accurate.

If I were in fear of being attacked by frequent bands of dinner plates then I would have to rethink "tactical accuracy" and versatility and such but for 90% of the shooting and reloading I do today the revolver is by far the better choice. Out in the field the semi auto is pretty much ignored in impromptu long range plinking and vermin killing along with hunting semi dangerous animals.

Choosing a revolver is subjective and you need to find the one that fits you best. I am a huge fan of 44 mag revolvers with my favorites being a cut down Redhawk and a Dan Wesson revolver in 44 mag. They will both outshoot my Kimber.

nn3453
06-24-2010, 9:54 AM
Are you in the bay area?

Ok, I'm not usually one to accept any type of challenge, but what the heck. We'll call it a friendly shoot/meet and not any type of comp or challenge.

You take 1 of your sub-$1K revolver and I'll bring a sub-$1K semi-auto and lets do a shoot at 25/50 yards off bench. Once that's taken care of, we'll do some offhand fun shoot. Totally non-scientific but it'll be an opportunity to meet up fellow calgunners.

Any bay area range is fine with me. Right now, I'm going to the range about once per week... so there (hopefully) is enough of a chance for us (and/or others) to meet up and just have some fun.

PS. You (and any others) are also very welcome to shoot my guns. Too bad I recently sold my pistol scope; otherwise, we can have a lot of fun going out to 100yds.

Sorry, about 5.5 hours away from you.

RedFord150
06-24-2010, 10:02 AM
second toughest, behind its big brother super redhawk in .357 :D...

I stand corrected and I agree that a Redhawk in .357 mag is built tougher than a GP100.
The RH was designed primarily for .44 mag and .45 LC and 'necked down' for .41 mag and .357 mag. I had the good fortune to shoot an RH in .41 mag with a 7.5" barrel. WOW...what a blast! I have never shot an RH in .357 mag. In fact, I had completely forgotten they were available in that cal. Comparing a Ruger GP100 to an RH is probably the same as comparing an S&W 'L-Frame' to an 'N Frame'.
Thanks for reminding me that such a great gun exists ;-).

Annonymous
06-24-2010, 10:57 AM
I really like my Taurus 66. With a 6 inch barrel it's really accurate and the double action trigger pull is pretty smooth for the price. If you want to spend more go with the S&W or Ruger but the Taurus isn't bad at all.

slobson
06-24-2010, 11:11 AM
I stand corrected and I agree that a Redhawk in .357 mag is built tougher than a GP100.
The RH was designed primarily for .44 mag and .45 LC and 'necked down' for .41 mag and .357 mag. I had the good fortune to shoot an RH in .41 mag with a 7.5" barrel. WOW...what a blast! I have never shot an RH in .357 mag. In fact, I had completely forgotten they were available in that cal. Comparing a Ruger GP100 to an RH is probably the same as comparing an S&W 'L-Frame' to an 'N Frame'.
Thanks for reminding me that such a great gun exists ;-).

you sir are very welcome! I don't know if you're out near VODP (the inland empire) very often, but if you are and you'd like to shoot one in .357 mag let me know!

RedFord150
06-24-2010, 1:14 PM
you sir are very welcome! I don't know if you're out near VODP (the inland empire) very often, but if you are and you'd like to shoot one in .357 mag let me know!

Thank you for a great invite. I am in the Glendora/San Dimas area. You may someday get a PM from me offering to bring some ammo to your next range trip.
The RH was discontinued in .41 mag many years ago. I always thought this was a mistake. I never cared for anything in .44 mag. I thought the .41 was the best of all worlds. Your .357 has to be a great shooter, even milder than the .41 if you don't mind the weight of the big, solid revolver.

MANNYSAR
06-24-2010, 6:50 PM
Yup I think I'm gonna get a ruger wish I had the cash for an s&w.

rumblebee
06-24-2010, 6:56 PM
Huh :confused: Get a Ruger\S&W...Hell, I'd choose a sling shot over a Taurus revolver anyday :eek:

Don't know that particular model. If it is a new manufacture Taurus, they've got a good reputation as a solid revolver that'll last.
The question is why (assuming you're shooting semi-autos already)? Revolvers are a real pain to clean and they aren't all that accurate. Just trying to prevent you from later selling it at a lose.

Sunday
06-24-2010, 7:34 PM
I would think in the short and long run an S@W or a Ruger would be money better spent. Revolvers are nice when it comes to picking up brass. Revolvers are easy to clean.

audiopro74
06-24-2010, 8:20 PM
I guess I better run out and buy a lottery ticket. I must be the luckiest son of a ***** on the face of the earth. I have 3 taurus in my safe that all run perfect. Millenium has never had a problem that was not induced by a lack of cleaning. 4-5000 rounds. 605 has never even had a hickup. Shoots straight, and decent groups for a 2". 2-3000 rounds. Oh and by the way the trigger is nice. Far better than the trigger they replaced in my ruger the last time I sent it in for service. And my tracker, let me just tell you.... Trigger has absolutely no creep, crisp break at about 3-4 lbs.

Auto vs revo. I would rather clean any of my revos over the autos any day. Faster and simpler. And I would put my blackhawk up against any auto any day. Bone stock vs bbone stock. Hell even an accurized auto.

And before everyone says I am just a taurus lover, let me tell you... In my safe right now are, Taurus, Ruger, Colt, Jennings, and my faithfull H&K. Not to mention I have owned a couple smiths over the years.

Whats in the headboard...... Taurus 605.
What do I take on the road with me... Taurus tracker.

The key to it all is to READ THE STICKY on how to tell if a revolver is decent or not. Go to the gun store, use these practices on the one you are looking at, and then tell the clerk that you will take "this one"

Yes taurus has had some quality controll issues. Everyone has. Talk to your local store, and see if like mine, they sell more taurus than any individual brand. More volume going out with the same percentage of Q.C. problems as the next company means you will hear more horror stories, but does not make one better than the other.

(Steps off soap box)

Carry on

Z ME FLY
06-24-2010, 11:01 PM
dfletcher , you Calguns Addict, you :) I was just promoted to calgun senior member, but I'm working hard to get into the calgun addict status. This thread is helping...

I see you are in the _bay area_! (Yeah, best place on Earth, just needs a few minor fixes.. like rmoving the earthquake issue, better gun laws, cheaper housing...)

My above post certainly applies to you too. I think meeting other calgunners is pretty fun in itself, and adding some unscientific test results to gunlore is icing on the cake.

You seem very experienced, and I'd be honored to get an opportunity to shoot w/ you and (hopefully) learn a thing or 2. I will bring a bona fide sub-$1k (new, street priced) semi-auto.

(I'm not revealing my gun in the hopes that it'll draw more folks out for a fun shoot. Plus, I don't have bad breath and smell very good, come out and have fun.)

See the thing is that a "sub" 1K semi auto can be a Dan Wesson 1911 that you found for $950 going up against a $500-600 S&W 686. Not really a fair comparison. I mean I'm just saying...

nn3453
06-25-2010, 4:07 AM
See the thing is that a "sub" 1K semi auto can be a Dan Wesson 1911 that you found for $950 going up against a $500-600 S&W 686. Not really a fair comparison. I mean I'm just saying...

My $700 625JM will outshoot my PM7. Not by a large margin, but it has a slight edge.

23 Blast
06-25-2010, 4:38 AM
As much as I love and enjoy my various semi auto pistols, it is my S&W M66-6 (4" barrel) which I can shoot most accurately, whether DA or SA, and with either .357 or .38.

Cleaning? Speaking as someone who generally dislikes the chore of cleaning guns, revolvers are easier and less time consuming. Yes, you have to swab and scrub six chambers in addition to the bore. But beyond that, you brush the forcing cone area, wipe down the frame where the cylinder goes, and that's about it. No disassembly required.

Even the simplest of my semi-autos (my Makarov, for instance) requires disassembly, swab and scrub the bore, swab the inside of the frame, brush the breechface, clean the firing pin channel, clean the internals of the frame, wipe the magazine well, wipe and oil the recoil spring, and, if I'm feeling energetic, clean the magazines. Then, reassemble.

A quality, double-action revolver is IMO the best general purpose handgun for just about anybody, but especially for a beginner and/or someone who doesn't plan on putting hundreds (or thousands) of rounds downrange per year. They're simple to operate, fairly intuitive, have a simple manual of arms, can be fired either double action or single action, can be loaded with many various types of ammunition, and are extremely reliable.

lazs
06-25-2010, 7:39 AM
For the average person a revolver is much easier to clean.. only a person who never owned a revolver would say otherwise. It is far easier to screw up a semi auto while cleaning it and to pack the action with crud.

Even on my Ruger revolvers I do a quick clean on the outside and the barrel and cyl after long shooting sessions and only pull the trigger group once a year or so or every 5 or six thousand rounds.. That is with lead 44 mag reloads. The action has never been really all that dirty.

Rugers can be extremely accurate but you have a slightly better chance of getting a tack driver Smith right out of the box.

norcal77
06-26-2010, 4:03 AM
Get a Colt...just be forewarned...they can be addicting:)...

http://i596.photobucket.com/albums/tt47/norcal77_photos/100_0205.jpg

Z ME FLY
06-26-2010, 4:16 AM
There's a colt agent selling in the classifieds right now... looks a little rough for the price but that can be due to the not so good pictures.

BTW if you ever want some cheap wood grips, there a guy on gunbroker I think named grand blue or something like that out of Thailand or something that makes some quality grips for $30 shipped. Those were the first things I switched out when I picked up my Early Trooper and have been very happy with the looks and the feel of it.