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View Full Version : Colt .45 Double Eagle Series 90


Mr. Ed
06-18-2010, 12:22 PM
Tell me what you know about this rare gun. What's a good fair market price for one of these in very good condition.

RedFord150
06-18-2010, 3:47 PM
If you want to buy mine, I'd say $1K is a fair price. If you want to buy someone else's, $600 to $700 is fair. They are not on the roster in CA. If you live in CA, you need to find a Private Party seller and agree to meet at an FFL for a 'Face to face' transaction.
They were manufactured by Colt from about 1989 to 1997, at the most. I first handled one around 1990.
Look for the Series 90, Mark II version. The previous version had some issues.
The guys I know who own them, love them. 1911 enthusiasts will tell you these are not 'Real 1911's'. They are right. 1911's are SA only on the first shot. DE's can be SA or DA on the first shot. Also, DE's do not have the grip safety. They do have a 'De-cocking lever'.
Mine is Full Size and Stainless in .45acp. This is most common version. They are available in other calibers and I have seen ads for blued finish. They also came in smaller 'Officers Model'.
Start looking ;-).

Mr. Ed
06-18-2010, 10:34 PM
$1000 is a fair price:eek: What makes the gun worth so much?

bjl333
06-18-2010, 11:46 PM
$1000 is a fair price:eek: What makes the gun worth so much?



Mr Ed, Looks like Mr Ford is pretty spot on for the value. $600 - $1000 IS the market value for these gals. Depending on condition and the buyer's WANT factor ... They are a footnote in Colt's long history ... Are they gonna go up in the future??? Depends if the said buyer's WANT factor is contagious or not !!!!

winnre
06-19-2010, 6:56 PM
Saw one used at a gun store today for MUCH less than a grand.

ejor
06-20-2010, 1:23 AM
they take regular 1911 magazines and and can use 1911 barrels also,

RedFord150
06-20-2010, 5:41 PM
$1000 is a fair price:eek: What makes the gun worth so much?

Sorry guys, you missed the sarcasm. I said mine was worth $1K, everyone else's is $600 to $700. Since mine is not for sale, it would take real money to convince me to sell it.
In reality, these are very hard to get in CA due to the roster issue. They just do not come up for sale very often. If you want a rare gun at a bargain price, you are either very lucky or waiting a really long time to find it, if ever.
The fair price for any item is what someone is willing to pay for it. Supply and demand dictates the price, not perceived value.
Good luck.

RedFord150
06-20-2010, 5:43 PM
Saw one used at a gun store today for MUCH less than a grand.

If it was for sale by a dealer, a So Cal resident cannot buy it unless he is LEO. If the gun was on consignment, it can be yours.

winnre
06-21-2010, 3:50 PM
There is one on consignment at THE SHOOTIST in Murrieta.

Black Majik
06-21-2010, 3:58 PM
In Calguns terms, Rare = Discontinued.

They're rare because it was so undesireable. A fair market price would be the seller giving you money, a coupon for a free #1 to In & Out, and a box of ammo.

bwiese
06-21-2010, 4:18 PM
In Calguns terms, Rare = Discontinued.

They're rare because it was so undesireable. A fair market price would be the seller giving you money, a coupon for a free #1 to In & Out, and a box of ammo.

Yeah, some people like 'em for their collections if they want a complete Colt line, but they're not desirable for
shooting/use, they're ugly as hell, and there are many other better places where a collector dollar could go.

RedFord150
06-21-2010, 4:44 PM
In Calguns terms, Rare = Discontinued.

They're rare because it was so undesireable. A fair market price would be the seller giving you money, a coupon for a free #1 to In & Out, and a box of ammo.

Only the people who have never owned or shot one say this. I know several DE owners who love them and would be reluctant to sell.

RedFord150
06-21-2010, 4:47 PM
...but they're not desirable for
shooting/use, they're ugly as hell...

Your opinion is based on...

beerman
06-21-2010, 7:51 PM
I remember standing in Turners for 2 hours back in the early 80s fondling and trying to decide between a DE and a 10MM delta. Guns were within 20 bucks of each other. Finally ended up with the Delta,I've never regretted the decesion.What turned me off on the DE was the trigger.I think they are fairly rare because of their unpopularity at the time and the fact that they only made them a few years.

dstiltner
06-21-2010, 7:54 PM
I saw one at the Bakersfield gunshow this past weekend for $900. It had a blued finish.

taguin
06-21-2010, 7:59 PM
1000.00 too pricey!

WINGEDSWORD
06-21-2010, 8:28 PM
I've never fired one, but I did handle one,when they first came out. I found the grip back strap combination to be very abrasive. A friend owned a gunshop, at the time and he told me that once he sold that one, he wouldn't order another one. He considered it unreliable. It's not that I don't like 1911's.
I own four Colts. But no DE.

RedFord150
06-22-2010, 9:42 AM
... A friend owned a gunshop, at the time and he told me that once he sold that one, he wouldn't order another one. He considered it unreliable. It's not that I don't like 1911's...

This is gun store FUD. This is also one of the reasons the DE never took off. The gun dealers did not know how to sell it and probably did not invest much effort in figuring it out.
The DE was released around 1989 to compete with the DA Semi-Auto market that had just become very competitive with LE agencies and military. The Beretta M9 had just been approved by the military and many large PD's were quickly switching from revolver to semi-auto's. The Ruger P-Series had just been released and Glock was quickly giving the established gun makers a serious run for their money with both LE and civilian buyers.
The old 1911 would normally be carried 'Cocked and locked' with a round in the chamber. This is not always a popular choice with many people. heck, I still do not like to see a holstered weapon with the hammer cocked. It just looks wrong. Anyway, Colt hoped to jump into the market with a 1911 style .45 that could be carried with a round in the chamber and the hammer down. The DE included a De-Cocking lever just for this purpose. The DE was a service/combat pistol, not a target pistol. It included 3 dot sights. Everyone I have fired is reasonably accurate for this type of pistol. No, it is not as accurate as my PM7. I personally bought the gun because I liked the idea of DA on the first shot.
A lot of people think it is ugly because it came in stainless with black plastic grips. I think Colt was trying to make it modern looking. This was probably a marketing decision. The grips are not easily changed because they hold some springs. If you remove these grips, you may have a little trouble finding the parts that went flying.
The grips on a DE are a little wider than a 1911. This is due to the DA trigger mechanism.
Colt also had some issues with the first version of the DE. The Mark II series supposedly resolved many of those complaints. Mine is a Mark II.
The DE does have a much different trigger than a 1911. I personally have grown used to it and have no issues. My DE was purchased used and has had thousands of rounds through it. Maybe this usage has improved the trigger.
Only one of the DE owners I know personally has sold his. I know 3 or 4 others that still own them and would never sell. I think the real value is probably $600 to $700 for an 80% to 90% specimen. Mine has tritium night sights, 4 mags, a shoulder holster, original case, and manuals. This might kick up the value closer to $1K.
If you can find an unfired NIB model in a less common caliber or model, you might pay a lot more for it. Think Officer's Model, Blued Finish, 10mm, 9mm, or 38 Super.
The gun was discontinued because of poor sales. This is very true. The lack of sales probably resulted from a lot of competition frm Beretta, Smith, Glock, and many others. The gun was also unpopular among 1911 fans. The DE was not a 'Real 1911' and many gun enthusiasts spread that message every chance they got.
The price was a little high for the time. The MSRP was around $679. The common sale sale price was around $500. I actually saw them new for around $450 in the early years. THe Glock was selling for $400 at the time and the Ruger P-Series was under $300, even for a stainless.Colt had a lot of competition for a much lower price and Colt quality was already very inconsistent in the 1980's.
Finally, the gun has a niche market. They are very hard to find in CA. I am surprised that 2 CalGunners have located DE's in Bakersfield and Murrietta. The Blued one for $900 is very rare. Those people who like them will pay the price. The rest of you will just gripe about how ridiculous those prices might be. To really appreciate the DE, you have to understand the semi-auto handgun market of the late 80's, early 90's. If you do not know the history, the gun does not make any sense.
Now, back to the 'flaming' of this under-rated and misunderstood Colt.

Mr. Ed
06-22-2010, 9:53 AM
Great replies everyone. I had the opportunity to shoot one a couple of weeks ago. It was extremely accurate. I had never heard of the Colt Double Eagle prior to that day, so I was very curious about it. I can always count on the collective knowledge of the Calguns community for gun info.

runninmike
06-22-2010, 10:14 AM
When these pistols 1st came out, I was able to see many of them at a weekly inspection we would provide for the public as a requirement to in order to fire on our military range. My opinion was that it was an interesting pistol, no more handsome or ugly than a Ruger P85. I personally like how they look, and I like the 1911A1 attributes that they have. I think at that time, people just were not ready to allow something different to happen to their beloved 1911A1 and sales were poor, the gun was just not received whole heartedly by the shooting masses and it eventually was dropped. People that owned them liked them very much, and people who did not own them and despised the pistol from it's looks talked trash and there you go. Just like many good designs, it just wasn't taken in by the masses. Some very nice vehicles have come and gone in the same manner, as well as some very good models of running shoes from Nike in the mid 90's-gone and missed by me!:D

Ninja45
06-22-2010, 11:21 AM
I owned a two full size DEs in the late 80's. The first one I traded for a used custom Colt Commander which I shot for three months. I sold the Commander and bought another DE. I really loved that pistol until I let my best friend shoot it at one of our range outings. I never was able to pry it out of his hands. He said it was the most accurate pistol he shot! I reluctantly sold it to him (I still regret it to this day) and bought me a commander size DE. Very handy, very accurate pistol that I have to this day and will not sell unless offered a very BIG $$$$ amount.

So, there...my 2 cents.

vf111
06-22-2010, 11:54 AM
I sold a stainless 10mm S90 MkII earlier this year for something like $1K. It had the original hard case, Colt cardboard sleeve and all paperwork. I picked it up on consignment a couple of years ago and it just sat in the safe never to be shot by me. Very interesting pistol - sort of like a 1911 and a Sig had a tryst. I personally think Colt made a mistake with the trigger guard design - if it was more like the 1911 TG, I think it would've had more aesthetic appeal and probably sold better. A pic from my files.

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh238/ak_chd/IMG_9178.jpg