PDA

View Full Version : can I sell reloaded ammo on gunbroker???


1911Operator
06-16-2010, 8:37 PM
If I reload ammo, can I legally sell it on gun broker? I know I cant sell to people in CA, so could I sell to people outside CA? also, I have about 4k rounds of 45 reloads that I bought at the cowpalace gun show. can I sell those since I now reload? The reason Id like to sell them is because I can use the money from that ammo and put it towards reloading components.

joelogic
06-16-2010, 8:39 PM
If you bought them from a person that loaded them and had a license to sell reloads then sell them to anyone. Why do you think you cant sell them to people in CA?

1911Operator
06-16-2010, 8:44 PM
If you bought them from a person that loaded them and had a license to sell reloads then sell them to anyone. Why do you think you cant sell them to people in CA?
I was told I can sell ammo that I bought to people in CA, but I cant sell ammo I made to people in CA. but this was from a friend that has been wrong about things before, so I wanted to see what you guys know about this subject! Calguns always seems to know best:D

ke6guj
06-16-2010, 8:45 PM
If I reload ammo, can I legally sell it on gun broker?if you reload ammo, you can't sell/give it to anyone, unless you have a type 06 or 07 FFL.

I know I cant sell to people in CA, so could I sell to people outside CA?that's not CA law, its federal law. you can't sell/give to anyone, in any of the 50-states unless you have an 06 or 07.

also, I have about 4k rounds of 45 reloads that I bought at the cowpalace gun show. can I sell those since I now reload? The reason Id like to sell them is because I can use the money from that ammo and put it towards reloading components.if you didn't reload them yourself, then you should be able to sell as you wish. Now, could you run into problems selling reloaded (by someone else) ammo while you also reload ammo yourself, yup. Even though you might not have broken a law, it could look like you did and you'd end up having to try to explain that that was different ammo. As for what you do with the money that you may make selling anything, there is no law that would prohibit you from spending it on reloading components.

grammaton76
06-16-2010, 8:46 PM
I was told I can sell ammo that I bought to people in CA, but I cant sell ammo I made to people in CA. but this was from a friend that has been wrong about things before, so I wanted to see what you guys know about this subject! Calguns always seems to know best:D

Ammo YOU made can't be sold to anyone, anywhere, in any state.

Ammo made by a licensed 06 FFL reloader can be sold to anyone as long as it's not afoul of some goofy law. You can sell those reloads you bought... you can't sell your own reloads unless you go getting a license.

1911Operator
06-16-2010, 8:49 PM
great info! and how hard/ how much is a 06 or 07 license? what all would I need to start selling my own reloads?

1911Operator
06-16-2010, 8:56 PM
I just read some info online on a 06 license and yes I DO NEED IT just like you guys said :D, its only $30 for 3 years so not bad at all. do I need some kind of insurance to make it too? does anyone know the price of it? or do i have to have it?

ke6guj
06-16-2010, 9:11 PM
all you NEED is the 06 and the proper zoning from your city to allow for ammo manufacturing (ATF checks for this and won't normally issue an FFL if the zoning won't allow for it). Now, you'd be dumb not to have insurance to cover your *** if your ammo causes a KaBoom!. And it is argued that an 06FFL must pay Dept. of State ITAR fees, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Traffic_in_Arms_Regulations , since ammo is usually a defense-related article. ITAR runs ~$2250 per year.

how much does insurance cost? IIRC, a couple grand a year per postings by some 06 and 07 FFLs.

joelogic
06-16-2010, 9:21 PM
Short answer, it not easy or cheap. City zoning and permits probably the big hurdle. Not worth it anyway unless you do huge volume or specialty work. Looked into it. ;)

bootcamp
06-18-2010, 6:07 AM
Short answer, it not easy or cheap. City zoning and permits probably the big hurdle. Not worth it anyway unless you do huge volume or specialty work. Looked into it. ;)

Joe, it don't help that you live in the city that wants to ban all firearms. :eek:

nn3453
06-18-2010, 7:25 AM
I just read some info online on a 06 license and yes I DO NEED IT just like you guys said :D, its only $30 for 3 years so not bad at all. do I need some kind of insurance to make it too? does anyone know the price of it? or do i have to have it?

OP, I know you asked this question in another place as well.

Here's my 2c (which you may not like to hear :) )

Experience with reloading takes time and you have to load thousands of rounds in various calibers before you get to the point that you can load well for yourself. To load for other people takes even more experience.

There are liability issues to consider. I have been loading for years, yet I would never ever expose my reloads for sale, legal issues aside. It is not because I don't trust myself, but because going down that path requires a shift in your thinking. It is not a hobby to make a few bucks on the side. You need liability, you need a business license, you need to keep books, report income, basically be prepared to run it as you would any small business. Without liability, a mistake on your or your customer's part will ruin you. Without thinking about equipment costs (no, you cannot practically use your Rock Chucker or Lee hand press to reload in bulk), relationships with distributors and wholesalers, marketing, sales, finance, legal matters, a new enterprise will not be successful. It takes years to build up credibility. Based on your posts, you seem pretty new to reloading and firearms in general.

I am not saying you shouldn't do it, but instead if you want to go down that route, you have a lot more things to consider and maybe 5 years from now, you can seriously consider it if you still feel the same way.

ak4777
06-18-2010, 10:22 PM
nn3453, +1.

He's got a really good point. It will be really hard to make a decent living or any money at that with all the insurance costs, time spent, and other efforts that need to be considered. Far from all that as well, reloading can be potentially hazardous and catastrophic because I have seen some people use purchased reloaded ammo and boom a case head pops off and the guns barrel shatters. This could be with ONE overloaded casing or just ONE weakened casing, and this could happen as well with just once fired brass as well. Considering that you will go through thousands of reloaded rounds for sale, it will be hard to be good at this, not to mention your customers will not exercise the same caution as you do. Quality control is what I'm getting at. You don't want a phone call from a dude who says "Hey, loved your 9mm, shot great until one of them popped my barrel open and cracked my slide." Then you are in trouble. And this is highly possible.

Joe, whatever you do, I wish you the best of luck. It is just a tough route, and people usually go factory or reload themselves, I never have bought reloaded ammo and a good amount of people wont even its from a trusted reloader. The fact is that the factory machines are much more precise than the human. (duh..) So yeah.
I actually like reloading my own :)