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Santa Cruz Armory
03-30-2006, 4:13 AM
This may be old news... a friend just sent it to me. I still cant figure out what the purpose of it is ?:confused:



BILL NUMBER: SB 1192 INTRODUCED
BILL TEXT


INTRODUCED BY Senator Hollingsworth

JANUARY 23, 2006

An act relating to firearms.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


SB 1192, as introduced, Hollingsworth Firearms: study.
Existing law generally regulates the transfer and possession of
firearms.
This bill would require the California State University at
Sacramento to conduct a study of the impact of various firearms laws
on violence and crimes involving firearms. The study would be
reported to the Legislature no later than January 1, 2008. The study
would be funded by grants and private contributions. The bill states
findings and declarations of the legislature in regard to studying
the impact of firearms legislation on violence.
Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: yes.
State-mandated local program: no.


THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. The Legislature finds and declares the following:
(a) In 2003, the federal Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention issued a report that examined the role of firearms laws on
violence.
(b) A study of California's legislative firearms control efforts
is necessary.
SEC. 2. The California State University at Sacramento shall draft
a research proposal using the 2003 Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention report on firearms laws as a model. The study shall focus
on the impact of assault weapons regulation, handgun safety testing,
handgun rationing, safety device requirements and regulations
governing buyers and sellers of firearms on violence and crime
involving firearms. The results of study shall be submitted to the
Legislature on or before January 1, 2008. The Chancellor of the
California State University at Sacramento shall seek grants and
private contributions to fund the costs of the study.

MrTuffPaws
03-30-2006, 6:05 AM
Pretty much all studies about gun ownership and crime rates shows that there is no correlation to crime. This is to set out and show that even though CA gun laws are draconian, they don't do squat to stop gun related crime.

Future ammo for getting the repealed

Santa Cruz Armory
03-30-2006, 5:41 PM
I hope this turns out in our favor....

Jarhead4
03-30-2006, 6:27 PM
I hope this turns out in our favor....

If it does, they won't believe it. Then they will just do another study until they get the answer they want.

taloft
03-30-2006, 6:34 PM
SEC. 2. The California State University at Sacramento shall draft
a research proposal using the 2003 Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention report on firearms laws as a model. The study shall focus
on the impact of assault weapons regulation, handgun safety testing,
handgun rationing, safety device requirements and regulations
governing buyers and sellers of firearms on violence and crime
involving firearms.

Basically, they are going to run the study using the guidelines set down my the CDC. I pulled that report http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5214a2.htm The report done by the CDC said that the studies used to draw conclusions on the effectiveness of handgun laws were inconsistent.

The Task Force's review of firearms laws found insufficient evidence to determine whether the laws reviewed reduce (or increase) specific violent outcomes (Table). Much existing research suffers from problems with data, analytic methods, or both. Further high-quality research is required to establish the relationship between firearms laws and violent outcomes. Potential areas for further investigation will be discussed in detail in an upcoming article in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

It boils down to who you ask, what you ask, and what you're looking for. I won't hold my breath waiting for a good outcome.

Bunyfofu69
03-30-2006, 7:30 PM
I'm actually a Graduate assistant on this study! Right now we are looking for grant money, but we may do a mail survey/telephone interview. Depends on how much money gets put into it.

taloft
03-30-2006, 7:57 PM
I'm actually a Graduate assistant on this study! Right now we are looking for grant money, but we may do a mail survey/telephone interview. Depends on how much money gets put into it.

Of who and what about? Seems an odd way of finding out the impact that gun laws have on crime.

I would think that the statistics for violent crimes committed prior to, and after the passage of these laws per capita would be sufficient to determine if they have any valid usefulness. You could date 10 years prior and 10 years after. How do they compare to areas that didn't have these laws during the same period? Maybe it's just me but, these seem to be better avenues of investigation than mailing surveys/telephone interview.

On the surface, it appears very subjective. How would John Q. Public know what the impact, if any, was?

a study of the impact of various firearms laws
on violence and crimes involving firearms.

This is the mission statement set forth in the bill. How will these surveys fit into the parameters set forth? I'm sure I'm not the only one who is curious about this, can you elaborate more?

Bunyfofu69
03-30-2006, 9:21 PM
A statistical study would only show what is usually does. Numbers. While they are good to show differences. You cannot imply causality (A causes B). There could be a number variables that need to be explored.The data gathering is only part of the study. I beleive we might be using stratified random sampling tecqnique of both gun owners and general public on the opinions of the laws, and the willingness to actually purchase a firearm. Using this data, and comparing it to crime in certain areas from which the data was collected would yield results. (hopefully some significane) if not....then back to the drawing board.


Example.

Solano County w/ low willingness to purchase a firarm (maybe due to laws), and comapre with crime (low willingness and low crime= impact)

So many other factors need to be considered (i.e. population, median home price, etc.)

adamsreeftank
03-31-2006, 12:17 AM
A statistical study would only show what is usually does. Numbers. While they are good to show differences. You cannot imply causality (A causes B). There could be a number variables that need to be explored.The data gathering is only part of the study. I beleive we might be using stratified random sampling tecqnique of both gun owners and general public on the opinions of the laws, and the willingness to actually purchase a firearm. Using this data, and comparing it to crime in certain areas from which the data was collected would yield results. (hopefully some significane) if not....then back to the drawing board.


Example.

Solano County w/ low willingness to purchase a firarm (maybe due to laws), and comapre with crime (low willingness and low crime= impact)

So many other factors need to be considered (i.e. population, median home price, etc.)

Sometimes I'll answer some of the questions when people call for a survey or poll, but I never give personal info like income, and if they started asking if I owned any guns, I'd probably hang up on them. I think you might have trouble getting accurate results from a phone survey.