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Slash2
06-07-2010, 6:57 AM
I've heard that freezing meat below zero Fahrenheit will kill all the nasty pathogens in the meat. If this is the case do you feel comfortable cooking your previously frozen wild pork to medium rare? Say 150 to 155 degrees?

p7m8jg
06-07-2010, 7:02 AM
I've never heard that freezing so low can kill all the really nasty ones. Only thorough cooking can do that. Anything "anaerobic" bacteria wise or pathogen wise doesn't need oxygen so it'll live through freezing. Like them trying to find life on Mars.....

ScottB
06-07-2010, 7:25 AM
From the Mayo Clinic:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/trichinosis/DS00689/DSECTION=prevention
■Avoid undercooked pork, walrus, horse, bear or other wild-animal meat. Be sure the meat is cooked to an internal temperature of 170 F (77 C) throughout before eating it. Even though trichinella are less common in pork, it's better not to eat pork if it hasn't been cooked to this temperature.

■Have wild-animal meat frozen or irradiated. Trichinosis can occur in any meat-eating mammal. Irradiation will kill parasites in wild-animal meat, and deep-freezing for three weeks kills trichinella in some meats. However, trichinella in bear meat does not die by freezing, even over a long period. Neither irradiation nor freezing is necessary if you ensure that the meat is thoroughly cooked.

■Other processing methods don't kill parasites. Other methods of meat processing or preserving, such as smoking and pickling, don't kill trichinella parasites in infected meat.

■Clean meat grinders thoroughly. If you grind your own meat, make sure the grinder is cleaned after each use..

NOTE: I have read in other sources that when freezing the meat must be held below zero degrees fahrenheit. I don't think most home freezers are capable of this.

Slash2
06-07-2010, 7:36 AM
Thanks guys, this is good to know. It appears I was misinformed. I will be sure to cook my piggies into submission.:D

professionalcoyotehunter
06-07-2010, 7:56 AM
I leave mine a hair pink so they dont dry up on the smoker. The store bought pork I will cook till almost well done.

ScottB
06-07-2010, 8:00 AM
A couple ways to keep pork from drying out is to

1) brine it for several hours in a 'flavor brine" - its more brown sugar than salt, but still tastes briney (and sweet) - rinse meat thoroughly after brining

2) Cold smoke and then grill fast and hot. A light BBQ glaze of your choice works well.

77bawls
06-08-2010, 3:24 PM
From the Mayo Clinic:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/trichinosis/DS00689/DSECTION=prevention


NOTE: I have read in other sources that when freezing the meat must be held below zero degrees fahrenheit. I don't think most home freezers are capable of this.

A cooler with dry ice would be sufficient. Dry ice = -94F or -70C

professionalcoyotehunter
06-08-2010, 3:44 PM
I had wild pork for dinner last night and I had it again this afternoon for lunch. I left it a hair pink and it was great.

Slash2
06-08-2010, 3:45 PM
"Have wild-animal meat frozen or irradiated. Trichinosis can occur in any meat-eating mammal. Irradiation will kill parasites in wild-animal meat, and deep-freezing for three weeks kills trichinella in some meats."

My Deep-freezer is set at 5 below zero, so the last pig went in the freezer on Saturday......

Grilled juicy chops on the 4th of July!

professionalcoyotehunter
06-08-2010, 3:49 PM
Sounds delicious.

sargenv
06-08-2010, 3:55 PM
Cooking anything to 170 degrees meat wise is pretty much making it into shoe leather.. if you are afraid of a little bit of pink, your best bet is to turn it into jerky.. at least you KNOW it is supposed to be dry.. I prefer my pork a bit pink and juicy as opposed to completely nuked and dry as shoe leather.. if it's dry, it's overdone.. IMO..

JOEKILLA
06-08-2010, 4:27 PM
I gotta go get me some wild pig first :D

bigboarstopper
06-08-2010, 4:31 PM
you can cook hog meat at very low temperatures. It just takes a lot of time. Plan on 4-5 hours. The meat will fall off the bone.

tacster
06-09-2010, 9:41 AM
you have to freeze the meat at a certain temp, for a certain amount of time in order to kill all the parasites in the meat. like 6 months in a regular home freezer, but less time in a sub zero freezer (i think its a month or 2). just freezing something until frozen does not guarantee it will kill of whats in the meat. cooking all the way will kill whatevers in the meat. with store bought pork the fear is trichanosis which is killed at 140 degrees. they say to cook pork to 160 to be safe. trichanosis is not common any more in commercial pork. its a problem of the past. any pro chef will serve the pork chops a lil pink on the inside. if you cook it to 170 like http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/tri...ION=prevention says to it will be dry and chewey.

but i ask are you starving? is it worth the risk? ive eaten plenty of fresh wild pig not cooked to death, but the more nasty bugs, growths, worms, and eggs ive seen in wild pig the more carefull i am. i worked at a wild game butcher shop for a while. some pretty nasty stuff came in there.

Rusty_Buckhorn
06-09-2010, 9:49 AM
wild hog meat is obviously WAAAY to dangerous for you lightweights.... better send it all my way, to dispose of properly :whistling:

Slash2
06-09-2010, 9:55 AM
but i ask are you starving? is it worth the risk? ive eaten plenty of fresh wild pig not cooked to death, but the more nasty bugs, growths, worms, and eggs ive seen in wild pig the more carefull i am. i worked at a wild game butcher shop for a while. some pretty nasty stuff came in there.

What sort of things can a person look for as they are cleaning and butchering their hogs? Are there obvious signs to be aware of? Are the nasties easy to spot by the untrained eye? I've only done three pigs now and haven't noticed anything that would alert me to a problem, but then I may not know the signs if I saw them.

Big Jake
06-09-2010, 9:55 AM
"Have wild-animal meat frozen or irradiated. Trichinosis can occur in any meat-eating mammal. Irradiation will kill parasites in wild-animal meat, and deep-freezing for three weeks kills trichinella in some meats."

My Deep-freezer is set at 5 below zero, so the last pig went in the freezer on Saturday......

Grilled juicy chops on the 4th of July! :piggy: :drool5:

professionalcoyotehunter
06-09-2010, 10:22 AM
The only meat I intentionally dry out is coyote to be sure it is safe. I will be starting a batch tonight so people who tag along on my next hunt can try it.

Rusty_Buckhorn
06-09-2010, 10:38 AM
The only meat I intentionally dry out is coyote to be sure it is safe.

me too.... in fact, all the coyotes I've ever killed are STILL out drying, lmao:tt2:

bigboarstopper
06-09-2010, 4:16 PM
What sort of things can a person look for as they are cleaning and butchering their hogs? Are there obvious signs to be aware of? Are the nasties easy to spot by the untrained eye? I've only done three pigs now and haven't noticed anything that would alert me to a problem, but then I may not know the signs if I saw them.

Hogs may be dirty but in my experience in regards to parasites deer are far more dirty. The things on hogs to look for are abseses. They are like cottage cheese pockets that will have a foul odor. They are usually found just under the skin. Rattle snake bites will have areas that have yellowey water filled bags. They are pretty obvious. The one thing that will make me leave a hog in the field are extremely emaciated pigs. Skinny, boney or otherwise very unhealthy hogs I leave lay.

One thing when skinning a hog is not to forget to remove the glands. A lot of people forget to remove them. You can find them in the armpits on all 4 legs between the leg and chest/hind leg and groin. They are kidney bean size and are surrounded by subcutainious tisssue (like plastic wrap). If you froget to remove them you will notice an extreme bitter taste in your meat that has a gland in it.

Slash2
06-10-2010, 4:43 AM
Hogs may be dirty but in my experience in regards to parasites deer are far more dirty. The things on hogs to look for are abseses. They are like cottage cheese pockets that will have a foul odor. They are usually found just under the skin. Rattle snake bites will have areas that have yellowey water filled bags. They are pretty obvious. The one thing that will make me leave a hog in the field are extremely emaciated pigs. Skinny, boney or otherwise very unhealthy hogs I leave lay.

One thing when skinning a hog is not to forget to remove the glands. A lot of people forget to remove them. You can find them in the armpits on all 4 legs between the leg and chest/hind leg and groin. They are kidney bean size and are surrounded by subcutainious tisssue (like plastic wrap). If you froget to remove them you will notice an extreme bitter taste in your meat that has a gland in it.

Thanks for the informed and relevant responses BBS, (unlike a few of you other guys!:D)

tacster
06-12-2010, 2:24 PM
What sort of things can a person look for as they are cleaning and butchering their hogs? Are there obvious signs to be aware of? Are the nasties easy to spot by the untrained eye? I've only done three pigs now and haven't noticed anything that would alert me to a problem, but then I may not know the signs if I saw them.

as bigboarstopper said if its a skinny unhealthy looking pig its probably got some problems, depending on the time of year. when you shoot a pig check the body for wounds never healled, growths and such you will know when you see those! check out the organs, make sure they look normal. not a funky color, no little white egg sacks, or worms in em. some internal parasites move from the guts to the meat. theyre especially prevalent in the tenderloin because its closest to the guts. look for small white egg sacks in the meat. theres also external parasites on everyone ive shot. pig lice,lice eggs, ticks... an unhealthy pig might have a ton of them. its not a reason to throw the pig out. but its an alarm to keep an eye out for other signs of infection.

the worst ive seen was in a deer. there were egg sacks throughout the meat. the deer had a bald spot in its hip (perhaps a sign of infection?), and appeared to have been hit by a vehicle at some point in its life because the spine, and a few ribs were growin weird. the deer was super skinny. the hanging weight was like 60 lbs or something. it was a 3x3 so a couple years old at least. ive been told it was tapeworm, but i never confirmed. the egg sacks were small and round in the meat, but when you looked close it was speraled like a snail shell

Sunday
06-12-2010, 3:27 PM
Cook the meat thouroghly. Well done doesn't mean dry like leather. I am waiting untill the government bans growing beef in this country because of the "Green house gas" and we will eat made in china beef!!! Think about the beef we eat , if there is a bad part it is cut away and the rest of the beef is used.