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View Full Version : Somebody Help! My Flowers are Dying!!!


2Cute2Shoot
05-19-2010, 7:40 AM
Hi Everybody! Well it's a sad morning. In march, my mom took me to Home Depot and I picked pretty new flowers for my house. They are called fireball red marguerite daisies :). They are SO pretty and year round, so not the kind that die at the end of the season. They looked beautiful and full like this when I got them:

http://i923.photobucket.com/albums/ad78/toocute2shoot/Hurt%20Locker/margueritedaisies2.jpg

So anyway I'm taking totally good care of them but last month they all start to die :(.

http://i923.photobucket.com/albums/ad78/toocute2shoot/Hurt%20Locker/Image074.jpg

I wish I took a picture when all my flower buds started passing away, but I forgot so you can't see what made me really scared. I read in my flower encyclopedia that I was supposed to prune 'a little at a time' so i started with that, but sooo many were dying. I kept clipping and clipping and now they are almost all gone and I don't know if my flowers will make it!!

http://i923.photobucket.com/albums/ad78/toocute2shoot/Hurt%20Locker/Image075.jpg

I'm going to Reno to see my (kinda) new guy for Memorial Day weekend and I'm so sad to think my flowers might not survive and will die alone while I'm gone! There is NOTHING on fireball marguerites ANYWHERE online so I don't know what else I can do! I hope someone can help!

lugar
05-19-2010, 8:02 AM
We have had a similar problem here and believe it is the Miracle Grow moisture control potting soil. The roots were rotting. Everything we repotted using regular potting soil is now thriving. It makes sense. Plants like good drainage.

8bitnintendo
05-19-2010, 8:05 AM
According to the (brief) info I've found online on marguerite daisies, they bloom mostly in cooler weather (spring and fall.) Maybe it's just getting to warm there for them to flower? It looks like the leaves are quite healthy, so the plant doesn't appear to be dying. If you keep deadheading the flowers that are going brown and trim back up to a third of the straggling branches, you should be fine. :)

I'm not a plant expert though... I don't have a yard, so all I have are office plants.

Edit to add: I also agree with lugar, if the soil is always damp and holds moisture well, rotting roots could be the culprit if the plant seems overall unhealthy.

professorhard
05-19-2010, 8:08 AM
Cover them in amonium nitrate fertilizer saturated with deisel, stick a fuse in, light it and watch them BLOOM

pullnshoot25
05-19-2010, 8:34 AM
Send a PM to Chaparralcommando.

mattmcg
05-19-2010, 9:00 AM
While it seems that the blooming season is over for those, by looking at the leaf petals, I can tell you are over-watering them quite a bit. This is a pretty common scenario when an owner really loves a particular plant and thinks the extra watering attention is good for them.

This particular type actually likes a bit drier soil. The best thing to do at this point is repot it in fresh soil and only water when you can stick your finger in the soil and not feel any residual dampness (3-4 inches down). I would also trim off any dying bloom buds to allow the plant to expend energy back to the roots to grow them back into a healthy plant. Healthy plants always start with healthy roots and I'm sure when you repot it, you'll see (and smell) a bit of rot there which is always the sure sign of over-watering.

Yes, guns by weekend and a bit of horticulture thrown in for me! :D

mswanson223
05-19-2010, 9:13 AM
Hes right over-watering. we get this problem from time to time where i work.
Use your finger to check for moisture and if dry then water.

2Cute2Shoot
05-19-2010, 9:39 AM
While it seems that the blooming season is over for those, by looking at the leaf petals, I can tell you are over-watering them quite a bit. This is a pretty common scenario when an owner really loves a particular plant and thinks the extra watering attention is good for them.

This particular type actually likes a bit drier soil. The best thing to do at this point is repot it in fresh soil and only water when you can stick your finger in the soil and not feel any residual dampness (3-4 inches down). I would also trim off any dying bloom buds to allow the plant to expend energy back to the roots to grow them back into a healthy plant. Healthy plants always start with healthy roots and I'm sure when you repot it, you'll see (and smell) a bit of rot there which is always the sure sign of over-watering.

Yes, guns by weekend and a bit of horticulture thrown in for me! :D

Thank you so much Matt! How can you tell by the leaves that I am over watering them? I was worried to trim too much since I have trimmed all the brown stems already and I didn't want to send my poor plant into shock :(.

2Cute2Shoot
05-19-2010, 2:37 PM
We have had a similar problem here and believe it is the Miracle Grow moisture control potting soil. The roots were rotting. Everything we repotted using regular potting soil is now thriving. It makes sense. Plants like good drainage.

I think everybody thinks I am over watering, so I'd better stop. I will try the moisture control soil...thank you Lugar....but I hate touching the soil (yuk) so I am not looking forward to that part :(. I hope it isn't too late for my plants, because Home Depot isn't selling these anymore and I don't want to have to wait until next year!

masameet
05-19-2010, 8:42 PM
You could use gardening gloves and wooden BBQ skewers to test the soil's moisture. :)

It's been many years since I was a green thumb enthusiast. Still judging by your photo, I'd say you might have about four Marguerite daisy stalks in that planter. Have you thought about separating them, say, two stalks per planter? That'd help the roots. And since daisies apparently thrive on drought-like conditions, maybe keep the soil loose by adding gravel, which will in turn facilitate drainage?

2Cute2Shoot
05-19-2010, 9:30 PM
You could use gardening gloves and wooden BBQ skewers to test the soil's moisture. :)

It's been many years since I was a green thumb enthusiast. Still judging by your photo, I'd say you might have about four Marguerite daisy stalks in that planter. Have you thought about separating them, say, two stalks per planter? That'd help the roots. And since daisies apparently thrive on drought-like conditions, maybe keep the soil loose by adding gravel, which will in turn facilitate drainage?

Yes, I will definitely use gloves. When my dad was in the hospital and I was visiting him, I stole a whole bunch of medical gloves :p. I stuck them in my bag and I wear them when I have to touch soil...which smells like dog poo to me:ack2:.

That's a good reminder about the skewer to test moisture. I actually bought the gauge you can stick in to see how moist it is...I should use that. I don't know if I want to traumatize my poor plant anymore by separating the stalks, and also I loved how full it looked in full bloom and I won't get that much if my plant gets separated. So I will repot and see how it does!

glockwise2000
05-19-2010, 9:59 PM
Yes, I will definitely use gloves. When my dad was in the hospital and I was visiting him, I stole a whole bunch of medical gloves :p. I stuck them in my bag and I wear them when I have to touch soil...which smells like dog poo to me:ack2:.


No wonder the inventory of gloves on the hospital that I work runs pretty low quickly.:eek:

nick
05-19-2010, 10:12 PM
Looks like the roots are rotting. Make sure the drainage is good. You might want to re-pot them into something that has good drainage (both soil and the pot).

It isn't one of those pots without the drainage hole on the bottom, is it?

PORCH
05-19-2010, 10:13 PM
I think everybody thinks I am over watering, so I'd better stop. I will try the moisture control soil...thank you Lugar....but I hate touching the soil (yuk) so I am not looking forward to that part :(. I hope it isn't too late for my plants, because Home Depot isn't selling these anymore and I don't want to have to wait until next year!

I think that you misunderstood him. He said that the problem he had was due to the moisture control soil. He had better results with the regular stuff if i understand correctly.

mattmcg
05-19-2010, 10:17 PM
I think everybody thinks I am over watering, so I'd better stop. I will try the moisture control soil...thank you Lugar....but I hate touching the soil (yuk) so I am not looking forward to that part :(. I hope it isn't too late for my plants, because Home Depot isn't selling these anymore and I don't want to have to wait until next year!

So one more tip I'll give you is to not simply stop watering as that will surely put the plant into shock and allow the inefficient rotted roots to starve the plant quickly. The best transition is to repot in completely fresh soil. You can use the same pot, just make sure to throw out the old potting material (or throw it in a compost pile somewhere else). Strip the dirt and rotted portions of the roots in the process as this will remove any disease and residual rot from corrupting your new pot.

With fresh potting soil, rehabilitated roots, and effective lighting, you will give your beloved plant the fresh start to invest its energy into new root development and down the road, beautiful new blooms.

While I'm certainly more a man's man (wife's words), somehow I have developed a reputation for saving peoples beloved plants (and in turn flowers) over the years. Troubled plants seem to find there way to me somehow........ The side benefit is that I've root propogated some of my favs and the wife is happy with a fairly diverse garden of exotic plant life and some real fantastic orchids! :D

lugar
05-20-2010, 2:14 AM
I think everybody thinks I am over watering, so I'd better stop. I will try the moisture control soil...thank you Lugar....but I hate touching the soil (yuk) so I am not looking forward to that part :(. I hope it isn't too late for my plants, because Home Depot isn't selling these anymore and I don't want to have to wait until next year!

I'm sorry I wasn't clear. DO NOT use MOISTURE CONTROL. It is in our opinion
what caused the root rot.

missiondude
05-20-2010, 11:46 AM
Are you sure that a neighbors dog is not "watering" them for you? I have lost several flowering plants due to goddamn dogs marking...

2Cute2Shoot
05-20-2010, 12:04 PM
Are you sure that a neighbors dog is not "watering" them for you? I have lost several flowering plants due to goddamn dogs marking...

Oh yuk...that's a sick thought :ack2:. And right before I dig my hands into that yucky soil too :mad:

winnre
05-20-2010, 12:35 PM
I've given up on plants. I have trees and whatever Mother Nature put there, and I'm lucky to have that. Nothing else stands a chance.

todd2968
05-20-2010, 8:46 PM
It looks like the terra cota pot has no holes in the bottom, I could be wrong.
I'm thinking over watering from the pictures also. If there are holes in the bottom put water only in the bottom pan and water will be absorbed (osmosis) to the plant. If no holes put in better pot.

2Cute2Shoot
05-20-2010, 9:41 PM
It will really absorb the water from the pan?? I think my pot has 1 big hole in the bottom but it sits on its plate that might cover that hole. That makes me remember my teachers who thought I was stupid and would say "you should have at least learned something from osmosis". :p

Now I have too many different things to try and I don't know which I should do :confused:

It looks like the terra cota pot has no holes in the bottom, I could be wrong.
I'm thinking over watering from the pictures also. If there are holes in the bottom put water only in the bottom pan and water will be absorbed (osmosis) to the plant. If no holes put in better pot.

todd2968
05-21-2010, 8:51 AM
Everyone has their own opinion, but future reference filling the bottom pan is the best way to water and not over water.

diginit
05-30-2010, 8:02 PM
I like the Amonium Nitrate idea...Alittle Tannerite goes a long way. But mixing it with diesel fuel is illegal and a fuse won't set it off. Anyways,
You can buy little sticks that tell you when to water your plants at nurserys. They're moisture sensors. And make sure there is a hole in the bottom of that pot.