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HokeySon
05-17-2010, 9:44 PM
So after reading the rabbit thread, I figured I better look into this all some more (cuz they all look like jack rabbits to me, except the one posted PCH -- that one is just evil and demented) and I found one site claiming that jack rabbit flesh is "excellent eating." Have always heard the exact opposite. My dad swore that they were stringy and awful. G'ma said they would kill them in roundups in the depression and that they were not worth eating. what say you guys?

theseacow
05-17-2010, 9:54 PM
the ones i tried tasted like dog crap. im convinced that the people who say they are good, simply don't know what good food actually tastes like. just my opinion. YMMV.

Thefeeder
05-17-2010, 10:30 PM
Rabbit ala Caciadore

Remove all brused tissue and blood from meat with cold water and a knife

Cut the dressed rabbit in pieces like a chicken.
Dredge in flour seasoned with salt and pepper

On high heat
Fry the pieces in 1 cup of oil until brown.
Remove and set aside.

Cut one medium onion into 1/2" chunks ---add to pan, cook for 2minutes--

Add 6 mushrooms sliced to pan cook 1 minute
Add 6 cloves of garlic to pan cook one minute.

Add a can of crushed tomatoes to pan cook 15 min on med heat.

Add 1 cup of wine to pan and place the rabbit back in pan.
Add 1/2 cup of chopped parsley, 1/2 teaspoon of sage.

Add water or broth to cover meat....cook until you can pull the meat from the bone with a fork with little effort.....about 1-2 1/2 hrs. Add water if needed , add salt and pepper to taste

Young animals are best to eat and cook up faster. But every meat will be tender if you cook it in liquid for a long time.

We always eat winter rabbits---Sept to Jan. Cottontail are so much better then Jack.

Many more recipies for any Calif game, except bear....nasty!

Cougar125
05-18-2010, 12:15 AM
I boil them with bay leaves until the meat falls off the bones then there are endless possibilities.

Mike A
05-18-2010, 6:18 AM
Like most animals, the young ones are pretty good; the old crabby arthritic ones are nasty. Use a European cookbook and look up recipes for "hare." Or just use the meat of the young ones for chile con carne "mystery meat."

I think people always compare them to cottontails and find the jackrabbit meat poor by comparison. Because cottontails are one of the BEST game animals to eat! (As long as you eat around the birdshot....).

Jackrabbit meat always needs shortening added; it is the definition of "lean". And it helps to mince it up; it is also the definition of "stringy". Tastes OK if you are very hungry. If not, why not leave it alone? (You might be hungry some day!).

NapaCountyShooter
05-18-2010, 6:29 AM
When we were broke, my stepdad would shoot them in the vineyards by our home and my mom would sloooow cook them in a stew with lots of flavor and they weren't too bad. The key is cooking them for a few hours so they're not so tough and then adding a lot of outside flavor.

edwardm
05-18-2010, 6:53 AM
I'll second the slow-stew method. A few years ago we shot a bunch up in Nevada, brought them back to camp, cleaned them and gave them to the nominated camp chef (he's actually a professionally trained chef now, to boot).

He made a stew that was awesome eating. BBQ'd they weren't too good - really tough and gamey, but in the stew with some carrots, taters, onions and spices, they were great.

When we were broke, my stepdad would shoot them in the vineyards by our home and my mom would sloooow cook them in a stew with lots of flavor and they weren't too bad. The key is cooking them for a few hours so they're not so tough and then adding a lot of outside flavor.

sargenv
05-18-2010, 7:35 AM
Likely the slow cook method is best.. I've found that when making my red pasta sauce, it is better to use stew type meats (cubed) and let them simmer in the sauce with tomatos, herbs, aromatic veggies (Onions, garlic, celery), and spices, and then after the meat starts to get to the point that it is falling apart, remove it from the sauce, let it cool, and then mince it up with a chef's knife and return it to the sauce.. simmer a bit longer until the sauce is the right consistency, then either use it for pasta or bottle and freeze it..

I tend to make my sauce by the 2-3 gallon batch so that I don't need to make it too often. I put it into mason jars hot, let em cool overnight and into the freezer they go. 1/2 pint, pint, and quart jars.. I find the 1/2 pints to be just right for about 6 ounces of dry pasta.. enough for a quick lunch.

I think the suggestion of recipes refering to Hare is probably good advice since the traditional recipes depended on a hunter providing the game to the chef. Sometimes I will forego the dipping in flour and fry in oil and use a teflon pan to brown the meat or brown it on a gas grill.

Mike A
05-18-2010, 7:54 AM
Heck, why leave the coyotes and the ravens all the good eats? (I make an exception for eating coyotes, crows, and ground squirrels, tho. Ground squirrels probably taste OK--everything that eats meat, including rattlers, seems to LOVE them. But those two little words "Black Death" tend to put me off!).

metalhead357
05-18-2010, 8:50 AM
Cottontail are so much better then Jack.!

X100 but in a pinch if yer' starving I'd doubt you'd know the difference. Its been 20+ years since I ate jack rabbit. I cant say it was good or bad...just edible.

5shot
05-18-2010, 4:30 PM
Crock Pots are perfect for jack rabbits. They turn any tuff meat into tender pieces. Like a lot of the guys said, slow cook in stews, or season and use the meat for tacos and burritos.

randy
05-18-2010, 5:30 PM
The only people I knew growing up that ate JR were the Piute indians. Cotton Tail for me.

ChaparralCommando
05-18-2010, 7:17 PM
I boil them with bay leaves until the meat falls off the bones then there are endless possibilities.

^This. I had some jackrabbit (boiled like this) last night mixed with BBQ sauce for a BBQ sandwich. Was as good as any other meat. Also works for tacos, casseroles, etc.

chefdude
05-18-2010, 7:23 PM
I love jack rabbit...all the worms make for good dental floss after the tough meat gets stuck between the teeth:cool:

SexPistol
05-18-2010, 7:42 PM
I shot a jack rabbit one time in hopes of having a meal then its ears were COMPLETELY covered in ticks so I just left it for the coyotes. Could I've still eaten it and not gotten sick?

ChaparralCommando
05-18-2010, 8:01 PM
I shot a jack rabbit one time in hopes of having a meal then its ears were COMPLETELY covered in ticks so I just left it for the coyotes. Could I've still eaten it and not gotten sick?

It seems like most rabbits I've shot have at least a few ticks and fleas. I was kinda surprised the jackrabbit I shot had neither. As long as you cook it thoroughly you are unlikely to get sick. Just skin it really quick and wear gloves so none of the parasites jump on you.

War Mother
05-18-2010, 9:40 PM
In my opinion rabbit meat is like most meats in that its very important how cook it and how you treat the animal after the kill.
LOTS of people raise rabbits for meat too