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View Full Version : Break in, Sighting.


Safonator
05-15-2010, 9:12 PM
I'm going to the range tomorrow to sight in my Rifle. I have heard a few different ways to break it it. What is the most common, or proper way to break in my barrel. I was told shoot it once, run a snake through it, and then shoot about 5 do the same, and repeat until i have shot about 25 rounds and snaked it 5 times.
Also, when i was getting a bag today i got some .223 55 gr PMC. Would this be suitable ammo to sight/ break my rifle in with or would i be better off using the 62 gr 5.56 that i have also?
OK now, sighting in. I was planning on setting up a target at 50 yards, using a rest and getting the irons dialed in. If i do this with the 223, would the sighting change with 5.56 ammo? I m sure heavier loads would affect adjustment at least i think it would. :confused:

Thanks

reidnez
05-15-2010, 10:56 PM
You'll get a thousand different answers on this.

Personally, I have yet to see any hard proof that explains why a break-in procedure is necessary or why it works, even with precision match barrels I don't think it's necessary. With a regular chrome-lined or stainless barrel, I think it's downright silly. I don't do anything special; just clean everything thoroughly after each range trip. That's just my opinion, others' will differ.

55 and 62 gr. will both shoot fine in all the common twist rates, you may see a small difference in point of impact but they will be pretty close.

At 50 yards, there will be very very little difference in point of impact between loads--I doubt you'll even see it. It would only begin to be a concern if you're shooting at longer ranges, 300+ where you start getting bullet drop.

Beelzy
05-16-2010, 5:57 AM
Snake bore to make sure it's clean, then shoot the crap out if it before you clean it.(4-500rds)

Enjoy the new toy!

Safonator
05-16-2010, 6:00 AM
Thanks, i'll try to get soem photos while i'm out.

pennys dad
05-16-2010, 6:11 AM
Hi

Here is a good link for sighting in an AR if needed.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=18&t=328143

Jpach
05-16-2010, 10:45 AM
Shoot, clean up all copper fouling. Repeat until the barrel doesnt foul mutch or at all after the previous shot.

Fjold
05-16-2010, 2:40 PM
Unless you're shooting a premium match barrel, a lot of break in is not required. It's kind of like porting and polishing the intake of a stock engine. You're doing a lot of cosmetic work that may only help you a miniscule amount.

With hand lapped/premium barrels all the break in needed is a polishing/cleaning of the throat where the reamer cut across lands to get the reamer marks to lay down in the direction of bullet travel.

neuron
05-17-2010, 2:42 PM
You'll get a thousand different answers on this.

Personally, I have yet to see any hard proof that explains why a break-in procedure is necessary or why it works, even with precision match barrels I don't think it's necessary. With a regular chrome-lined or stainless barrel, I think it's downright silly....

Probably true for the chromed barrels...As I understand it, the reason to "shoot and clean" a new barrel after each shot (usually recommended to shoot a round, clean the barrel till the patch is clear of copper, and repeat this for 10-20 shots), is that the barrel grooves have "rough edges" that need to be polished by shooting. The AR chrome lined barrels are supposedly already "polished." So this "shoot and clean" barrel break-in seems to be a traditional approach that may not be really needed with chrome lined barrels.

But doing it anyway can't hurt. :D

Mail Clerk
05-17-2010, 6:30 PM
If it were mine I'd first sight it in at 50 yards using standard 55 grains bullets from PMC are fine. PMC ammo is good quality and is available anywhere.

Depending on wether your barrel/chamber is hard chromed OR not just shoot slowly and take your time. Don't overheat the barrel.

When sighting in the rifle I usually shoot 5 rounds and then scope the target to get where it hits and then adjust the sights. After that I wait until a sieze fire is called allowing the barrel to cool. Take your time .......usually I can get my rifle sighted in using no more than 60 rounds combat style.

Mail Clerk

818gtiguy
05-21-2010, 8:56 AM
Sorry, had to do it..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRRahHX9Zkg
TRRahHX9Zkg

Sunday
05-21-2010, 4:35 PM
Barrels do not need a break in or the silly cleaning process that many people do . Excessive cleaning causes wear.

-hanko
05-21-2010, 5:01 PM
Probably true for the chromed barrels...As I understand it, the reason to "shoot and clean" a new barrel after each shot (usually recommended to shoot a round, clean the barrel till the patch is clear of copper, and repeat this for 10-20 shots), is that the barrel grooves have "rough edges" that need to be polished by shooting. The AR chrome lined barrels are supposedly already "polished." So this "shoot and clean" barrel break-in seems to be a traditional approach that may not be really needed with chrome lined barrels.

But doing it anyway can't hurt. :D
The 'shoot and clean' barrel break-in is also NOT necessary with unlined barrels.

In fact, if my new barrel had "rough edges" in the bore, I'd return it to the maker asap.

Don't believe everything you read.

In addition, you can get significantly more wear by cleaning the barrel than by putting bullets through it. If I were a barrel maker, an easy way to boost sales would be to come up with an involved cleaning and break-in procedure.;)

hth

-hanko

-hanko

reidnez
05-21-2010, 5:04 PM
Barrels do not need a break in or the silly cleaning process that many people do . Excessive cleaning causes wear.

Exactly. I've read a few articles which attempted to investigate the belief, and as best they could tell, some gunsmith invented the idea some decades ago and it has persisted ever since without any scientific backing. Some have even theorized that match barrel makers propagate it because it causes people to go through barrels faster. If you're a benchrest shooter who favors super-hot wildcats, and your barrels only last 1,000 rounds, and you blow 100 of those rounds with some elaborate break-in procedure, you'll be going through barrels 10% faster than otherwise.

neuron
05-23-2010, 1:25 AM
The 'shoot and clean' barrel break-in is also NOT necessary with unlined barrels.

In fact, if my new barrel had "rough edges" in the bore, I'd return it to the maker asap. (#1)

Don't believe everything you read.

In addition, you can get significantly more wear by cleaning the barrel than by putting bullets through it. (#2) If I were a barrel maker, an easy way to boost sales would be to come up with an involved cleaning and break-in procedure.;) (#3)

-hanko

Re: #1: Have you ever looked into a new barrel with a borescope? I have looked at many. Some show very smooth and sharp grooves. Others show quite a bit of "roughness" due to the various ways that the barrels are machined.

Re: #2: If you clean your barrel properly you will not produce "significantly more wear" than by shooting bullets through it. Of course you can wear and gouge a barrel by inept "cleaning," but I assume you know how to clean a barrel.

Re: #3: Just how would manufacturers "boost sales" by promulgating "involved cleaning and break-in procedure?" I'd think just the opposite...since the manufacturers would be telling folks they need to go through a lot of extra work to make the gun shoot well...:confused:

Mute
05-23-2010, 7:38 AM
Forget the break in. I've gone both route and I've seen others do the same. I've yet to see a practical difference between breaking in a barrel and not doing so. Either in the accuracy or in how well the barrel cleans. Just shoot it.