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maverickmage
05-15-2010, 6:05 PM
I've never hunted before, but I'm interested in trying it. I read up about the class, the license, and the tags. I think that if I went hunting for pigs/deers and land one, I would be standing over it thinking "now what?" I sure would like to eat what I caught, but not sure what my next step should be. Do they teach this too in the hunting class? Am I supposed to haul it on top of my Prius and drive it back to the city(LA) and take it home? Is there a place I can take it to, to get it skinned and butchered or is that part of my job? What do you do with all the meat? I'm not sure if I have that much space in my fridge... Is it just a big bbq day?

olhunter
05-15-2010, 6:47 PM
My advice would be to start small. Hunt rabbits. Learn how to hunt, skin and cook them. Then find someone with venison or wild pig and eat some. You may not like it. If you don't like it, then become a ninja varmint hunter and you can just leave them for the other varmints to eat. If you like wild game, find a butcher or processor near where you're going to be hunting and they can make steaks, rib, sausage, whatever you want. Or you can learn to do it yourself. It's easier if you find someone to hunt with that will show you. I would like to see a buck strapped to the top of a Prius though.

ScottB
05-15-2010, 8:17 PM
If you are referring to the hunter safety class, all they teach is the law and safe gun handling - which are important, but they won't cover 'how to hunt"

Take the DFG hunting clinics. You may have to drive a bit, but they will school you on the how to's. I know guys who have taken these clinics and its the fastest best start for a newb. The DFG also has some very good hunting guides on their website and I think you can still get hard copies at DFG offices (better and more durable than a printout). Last I checked, they had guides for quail, turkey pigs and deer.

IMO, a prius is not the ideal hunting vehicle,LOL, but it'll do. It will limit your access and you'll have to walk a little farther. Plan on boning out any large game and just bringing the meat home in a cooler. If you are able to bring a whole or quartered carcass back, there are game processors around. I sometimes use Bree's Meats in Garden Grove and like them. You will have had to at least field dressed the animal (i.e. gutted it) Birds are easy. Clean and pluck in the field (be considerate about not leaving a mess of feathers and remember to bring some trash bags). A small cooler and some ziplocks are fine to bring them home. Its the dog that takes all the room. Remember, how you handle game in the field has a lot to do with how it tastes. Field dress and cool the carcass ASAP. The sooner the meat is in the cooler the better. Same with ducks. I see guys shoot them at 6am, leave them laying in the dirt and the heat and clean them in the afternoon and wonder why they taste worse than liver. I have seen guys tag out a deer and stash the carcass in the truck all day while their buddy is still hunting. How do you think a porterhouse would taste if you treated the steer carcass like that?

maverickmage
05-16-2010, 12:11 AM
A lot of very good advices here. I'll definitely look into the DFG hunting clinics. Thanks, and also if I decide that I do like venison and get my first buck, I'll be sure to post that on here strapped to my Prius. lol.

r3dn3ck
05-16-2010, 9:09 AM
I don't ever take bone out of the field.

If you get a deer or a pig (big things) then hang that bastard up and cut all the meat off. Make cuts deep (to the bone) and long and don't saw at it. Taking the feathers off a deer is retarded simple but you should be properly taught. There's very little use for a knife in the skinning process except to make the initial cut. After that it's a lot like taking off a wet suit. Check out youtube.com for videos on how to skin large game. It's full of useful vids.

Once you have the feathers off, pull the meat off and wrap it in a proper game bag (they're like heavy duty gauze bags) and then get it in the cooler. Get it home and steak it out so you have about 4-8oz packets. 4oz of venison is a big dinner for 1 guy. 8oz of wild hog is a similarly big dinner for 1 guy.

Once you've got the hams and fore-legs and any ribs you want (I don't save deer ribs), then you're down to the back-strap and tenderloins. For backstrap cut down the spine and pull the strap out down the rib line like you would remove the breast meat from a bird. Neck meat is pretty good but full of connective tissue.

Serving venison: cut thin, pound (tenderize) thinner yet, cook hot and fast (not for long) and enjoy. You'll HATE yourself if you try to eat venison like you would beef steak or pork. You'd need alligator teeth and bulldog jaws to chew a thick cut of most any wild ungulate.

maverickmage
05-16-2010, 9:13 AM
Serving venison: cut thin, pound (tenderize) thinner yet, cook hot and fast (not for long) and enjoy. You'll HATE yourself if you try to eat venison like you would beef steak or pork. You'd need alligator teeth and bulldog jaws to chew a thick cut of most any wild ungulate.

Good to know. I'll have to admit that making thick slabs of steak was the first thought to cross my mind.

What do you do with the bones and the leftovers? Do you just bag it and throw it away? Leave it out for the scavengers? Bury it ;)?

r3dn3ck
05-16-2010, 9:20 AM
I don't feel the least bit bad about leaving a carcass out there right next to a gut pile. Don't bother burying it... something will eat it. I also like to see the gut pile and carcass laying around (as a hunter) when I'm hunting. It means the area has game and that I'm probably going to have to hunt harder because someone already took one.

fallbrook79
05-16-2010, 10:10 AM
there are some you tube videos on field dressing they will give you some sort of heads up.pretty much gut,skin,and quarter youll get 4 shoulders if you havent shot one of the fronts two back straps and a neck roast you can even keep the ribs and boil them for some good taco meat.good luck

wjc
05-16-2010, 7:53 PM
Here's some research from another new hunter:

Bookmark the link to the Department of Fish and Game website...view often.

maps..maps...maps!

Go to Jesse's Hunting and Outdoors website at http://www.jessehunting.com and look up California Meat Processors and Butchers.

The exact link is here:
http://www.jesseshunting.com/site/ca-butchers.html

LEM Products sells a pretty good collection of videos by Larry Metz on dressing dear. He's a professional meat processor.
The main link is here:
http://www.lemproducts.com/

The exact page is here:
http://www.lemproducts.com/category/87

Don't put the buck on the top of your Prius...you'll scratch the paint! :D

Seriously, the idea is to be discrete with the carcus so you:

a) don't heat the meat
b) don't offend the anti's by driving around with a dead buck on your hood. Some of them think it's Bambi. :rolleyes:

maverickmage
05-16-2010, 8:21 PM
b) don't offend the anti's by driving around with a dead buck on your hood. Some of them think it's Bambi. :rolleyes:

Cool will do. And I don't know. Their view of the world might implode seeing a dead buck on what is possibly the epitome of anti's car.

wjc
05-16-2010, 9:50 PM
yeah, the irony would be noteworthy!:D

Hunt
05-17-2010, 8:32 PM
once you sling your rifle over your shoulder and walk out into the wilderness you will be hooked forever.

5shot
05-17-2010, 8:56 PM
once you sling your rifle over your shoulder and walk out into the wilderness you will be hooked forever.

So very true.

All good advice here. I agree that you should start small. Go for some rabbits and quail. Their easier to locate in huntable numbers, and you'll probably be more successful sooner.
Everything you shoot should be pretty easy to field dress, and fit in a ice chest in whatever car you drive. And good eating too.
Once your comfortable in the field you'll start developing a lot of the skills needed to spot, stalk, and shoot big game.
Or, if you want to get into big game faster, I'd suggest you book a pig hunt with a good guide. You'll be with him when he glasses areas for pigs. If you ask, he'll tell you what type of terrain to glass, what times of the day animals move around, and what they eat in certain areas.
He'll field dress your pig, and show you how it's done. He'll talk to you about calibers and gun types he's seen that are successful. Most good guides are usually pretty talkative, friendly, and will answer just about any question you have.

ScottB
05-17-2010, 9:41 PM
I agree with using guides. Go to school on 'em. Don't act like a prince. Get your hands in that carcass and let them explain it as you do it. Soak up their knowledge like a sponge. If you have a freind who you can hunt with, do the same with them. I did both and it was worth it - and my friends were proud they could pass on what they knew and we we still hunt together.

HokeySon
05-17-2010, 10:23 PM
Serving venison: cut thin, pound (tenderize) thinner yet, cook hot and fast (not for long) and enjoy. You'll HATE yourself if you try to eat venison like you would beef steak or pork. You'd need alligator teeth and bulldog jaws to chew a thick cut of most any wild ungulate.

I dunno, I cooked up some backstrap venison a short time ago in thick chucks, like medallions more than an inch thick, soaked them in apple cider for a couple of hours, then in a BBQ mariande, wrapped in bacon -- was delicious. Had thick medallions is a berry sauce too. Agree on the hot and fast though.