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View Full Version : M1 Carbine or AR?


gotshotgun?
05-12-2010, 5:27 PM
Well, I have the gnawing urge to build an AR but I am limited to the number of guns I can have. I have an M1A that I love and will be keeping but I also have an M1 Carbine that I really like as well. My question is would the majority of you sell the Carbine and build an AR or keep the Carbine. Again, I can't have another gun right now, its just not in the cards.

I know the Carbine is worth about half a decent AR but I have Carbine ammo I could sell and some accessories plus the AR could be a build over some time.

As far as fun to shoot at the range and in the boonies goes, which one would you have? The Carbine is from 1943 and does have historical value and is in great shape, I just don't know. What's your folks' perspective?

TonyMang_89
05-12-2010, 5:43 PM
keep the carbine, build an AR when you can. Great thing about them is you can buy little at a time and eventually put the rifle all together

hoffman259
05-12-2010, 5:45 PM
keep the carbine, build an AR when you can. Great thing about them is you can buy little at a time and eventually put the rifle all together

+1

or option 2 sell me the carbine and build the AR....I would still do option 1

tileguy
05-12-2010, 5:47 PM
ditto

NorcalGSG
05-12-2010, 5:47 PM
That's a really tought one. I love the carbines and AR's as well. Honestly the AR is a more modern and versatile gun. The 5.56 has better range and power. Don't get me wrong, I love carbines too. But it sounds like you want something new to play with. If you think you can live with yourself afterwards, I'd say sell the Carbine and start an AR project! Its kind of like hacking up a matching #'s muscle car vs. modding a modern car. You don't care what you do to that modern car because there are so many. But if you want to change something or modify something on your classic, you'll probably feel bad knowing you just cut up some classic iron that can't be as easily replaced. The fun thing with AR's is there are so many ways you can set them up/change calibers/uppers, etc. etc that you can literally have a couple different guns with only really one gun.

NorcalGSG
05-12-2010, 5:48 PM
keep the carbine, build an AR when you can. Great thing about them is you can buy little at a time and eventually put the rifle all together

I was gonna say the same thing, but the OP said he is trying to limit his overall #. I was just trying to not be such an enabler;)

TonyMang_89
05-12-2010, 6:05 PM
ya i know, but there is always room for one more gun :D

Bhobbs
05-12-2010, 6:12 PM
I say keep the carbine. The AR is in production so it will be around for a while and doesn't have the historical value the carbine does.

bgoodman
05-12-2010, 6:25 PM
definitely keep the carbine. what is the manufacture of the carbine? Does it have a type 1 sight or bayonet lug? just curious...

rc50cal
05-12-2010, 6:35 PM
Another idea to consider: get rid of the significant other who won't let you buy another gun.

jshoebot
05-12-2010, 6:44 PM
"You'll never feel regret for not selling a nice gun."

savageno4
05-12-2010, 7:26 PM
Keep it. Buy an OLL and piece it together. You will regret selling the Carbine.

Blacktail 8541
05-12-2010, 7:31 PM
Keep the carbine, buy a lower and piece it together over time.

tacticalcity
05-12-2010, 7:36 PM
keep the carbine, build an AR when you can. Great thing about them is you can buy little at a time and eventually put the rifle all together

I agree with the above statement. You can start building your AR 1 part at a time. You could start with a $20-30 grip this month, $15 rail panels the next, a $100 lower if you have a good month, and on and on. Before you know it you're done. Can't afford a complete upper in one shot? Buy it in parts. When you buy the very last part send it to a company like CMMG or a another major (yet still service friendly) AR company like CMMG to assemble it for you. Make sure a couple of the parts are theres and they will be more than happy to do it for you.

I sell this stuff for a living and I still do this rather than spend all my money on a complete rifle. Its easier to justify the expense to yourself when it is a little at a time, and more fun seeing how the end rifle turns out.

One tip, don't go cheap. Don't talk yourself into building a $700 total rifle. Instead. Splurge but do it as you can afford it. Only have $10 that month? Find the best (as far as what you are happy with) $10 part for that rifle, no matter how small or insignifcant that part is in the grand scheme and get it - or set aside that $10 for next months part purchase. When all is said and done, every part on that rifle will be the part you wanted and not something you settled for.

gotshotgun?
05-12-2010, 8:14 PM
Wow so many perspectives, the carbine is a standard products with nothng rare on it. And the one while my fiancÚ isnthe strongest supporter of my habit, it's my choice, I like the hobby but can't invest more mney in it right now, I'm in school....

pyromensch
05-12-2010, 8:19 PM
keep the carbine, got a '44 myself, and it shoots great, piece together the ar.
by the way, when did you get the carbine, and how much?
big 5 was selling them 18 mos ago for $1000.

Eat Dirt
05-12-2010, 8:25 PM
Keep it. Buy an OLL and piece it together. You will regret selling the Carbine.

Same advice from me !!

KEEP IT !!!!

terry4130
05-12-2010, 8:32 PM
I fell ya on the school thing. I didn't buy a gun for my entire college experience since I lived at school and was 600 miles from home. I felt it wasn't worth it to buy something I couldn't readily use, so I built a dezert truck while in school (its still my DD). I also have a carbine and love that gun. It does have sentimental value, since it was one of the few things I have from my grandpa. It is also one of the most popular guns when we go camping. Now that I'm out of school I have started on my "collection", which is tiny in comparison to everyone else on this board. But, I agree with anyone that says you won't regret not selling it.

Jarrod

fastkevin
05-12-2010, 8:35 PM
If you have the budget to buy an AR(or build...) and you don't have some kind of emotional attachment to the M1 carbine, I'd get the AR. Apples to apples, it's just so much better of a weapon.

gotshotgun?
05-12-2010, 9:44 PM
I agree with the above statement. You can start building your AR 1 part at a time. You could start with a $20-30 grip this month, $15 rail panels the next, a $100 lower if you have a good month, and on and on. Before you know it you're done. Can't afford a complete upper in one shot? Buy it in parts. When you buy the very last part send it to a company like CMMG or a another major (yet still service friendly) AR company like CMMG to assemble it for you. Make sure a couple of the parts are theres and they will be more than happy to do it for you.

I sell this stuff for a living and I still do this rather than spend all my money on a complete rifle. Its easier to justify the expense to yourself when it is a little at a time, and more fun seeing how the end rifle turns out.

One tip, don't go cheap. Don't talk yourself into building a $700 total rifle. Instead. Splurge but do it as you can afford it. Only have $10 that month? Find the best (as far as what you are happy with) $10 part for that rifle, no matter how small or insignifcant that part is in the grand scheme and get it - or set aside that $10 for next months part purchase. When all is said and done, every part on that rifle will be the part you wanted and not something you settled for.


Thank you so much for the very thoughtful and helpful advice. You are absolutely right and I am going to go that route!

mls343
05-13-2010, 4:02 AM
Totally keep the carbine! Not only will it continue to go up in value, but it is a all around great little weapon. Like the other posts stated, you can easily build an AR one piece at a time. The soon to be Mrs will never really know and you can do it on a school budget. Just have one less beer night per week and viola, one AR in no time!

Greg-Dawg
05-13-2010, 4:02 AM
Both.

plankowner
05-13-2010, 5:09 AM
keep the carbine and enjoy you time building the ar

CmpsdNoMore
05-13-2010, 6:17 AM
I've regretted selling pretty much every firearm I ever sold (4 or 5). If you're going to sell it take some time and think about the pros and cons and if it really is a "good" rifle.

reidnez
05-13-2010, 6:31 AM
Keep the carbine! It may be common now, but there were only so many made. 1903's and M1 Garands used to be common and cheap, too. Now it's expensive enough just to feed them, let alone collect.

I like my AR's, too, but my C&R's are more interesting to me.

Cali-Shooter
05-13-2010, 10:16 AM
I have an Inland '43 M1 Carbine. Great shooter, there is no gun like it at all. Sure, the effective range is only 200-300 yds, but it is perfect for plinking, home defense, and urban SHTF scenarios. The only real problem is the cost of ammo. FMJ's cost, at best, .40 cents a round, and you'd be lucky to find any of decent manufacture at less than that. Soft points, which will turn the Carbine into an anti-personnel monster, will run on average .50 cents a round.
I have an Mega Machine/Bushmaster Upper AR, and IMO, I really love the m1 carbine, because:

The m1 has, and always will be, a semi-automatic rifle only, exactly how it has been in the hands of US military since it was introduced in WW2. Therefore, I have no 'envy' of wishing my M1 was a 'military' model that has selective fire, full auto, etc, because semi-auto carbines are the military models. Unlike my AR, which is strictly a civilian model, due to no selective fire so I have envy for the military models.

Iknownot
05-13-2010, 10:23 AM
I'd say pick based on which you like to shoot more, if you only could keep one.

If I could only pick one, I'd pick a carbine. The thing is just so light, small, and fun to shoot.

wsmc27
05-13-2010, 1:35 PM
If you have the budget to buy an AR(or build...) and you don't have some kind of emotional attachment to the M1 carbine, I'd get the AR. Apples to apples, it's just so much better of a weapon.

Ah yes, good point. Emotional attachment. :D

Our M1 carbine has been in the family since like Korean war era (iirc), so we are keeping ours AND building an AR or M4gery. ;)

I side with those that suggest building the AR bit by bit...

They are both great fun to shoot. :)

rjf
05-13-2010, 2:10 PM
The carbine will continue to appreciate in value while an OLL most likely will not. Sell the commercial M1A before the carbine.

lmudave
05-13-2010, 2:12 PM
You can easily build an AR one piece at a time. The soon to be Mrs will never really know and you can do it on a school budget. Just have one less beer night per week and viola, one AR in no time!

That's what I did... small packages coming in the mail every week or two start to raise suspicion though. That's when I started having them sent to my work!

usmcchet9296
05-13-2010, 3:09 PM
Got this from CMP last time they had them in stock for $400.00 USD
http://www.oniva.com/upload/204/M1_Carbine.JPG

http://www.oniva.com/upload/204/M1_Carbine_7.JPG

It was supposed to be a "rack" grade rifle but ended up to be a higher end service grade

Type 1 barrel band and puch button safety all Inland parts and great finish.

In fact other than the stock being a late model pot belly this rifle is sweet

M1 are a hoot to shoot and have that old school coolness about them

besides its small and accurate at ranges within 200 meters

thats Zombie huntin territory

Eat Dirt
05-13-2010, 3:46 PM
Great Pictures of a

Great Gun !!


( Me thinks it be the wrong helmet)

gotshotgun?
05-13-2010, 4:41 PM
Well I'm keeping the m1 folks! And shooting it tomorrow at Sunnyvale rod and gun if anyone wants to play.

Blacktail 8541
05-13-2010, 7:58 PM
I have an Inland '43 M1 Carbine. Great shooter, there is no gun like it at all. Sure, the effective range is only 200-300 yds, but it is perfect for plinking, home defense, and urban SHTF scenarios. The only real problem is the cost of ammo. FMJ's cost, at best, .40 cents a round, and you'd be lucky to find any of decent manufacture at less than that. Soft points, which will turn the Carbine into an anti-personnel monster, will run on average .50 cents a round.
I have an Mega Machine/Bushmaster Upper AR, and IMO, I really love the m1 carbine, because:

The m1 has, and always will be, a semi-automatic rifle only, exactly how it has been in the hands of US military since it was introduced in WW2. Therefore, I have no 'envy' of wishing my M1 was a 'military' model that has selective fire, full auto, etc, because semi-auto carbines are the military models. Unlike my AR, which is strictly a civilian model, due to no selective fire so I have envy for the military models.

Not quite accurate. The M1 carbine also had a brother that was designated the M2 and had full auto capability.

kgriff
05-13-2010, 8:45 PM
Decided to keep the little carbine? Good for you, they're great guns. I love mine and it's only one of those Auto Ordnance repops. I plan on getting a real one someday, sooner than later I hope.