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base64
05-05-2010, 6:13 PM
is it illegal to have disassembled nunchuks?

stix213
05-05-2010, 6:24 PM
isn't disassembled nunchuks just a chain and two sticks?

base64
05-05-2010, 6:25 PM
two very menacing looking sticks and two endcaps with bearings and a chain.

saelee23
05-05-2010, 7:00 PM
cant help it but to lmao

RomanDad
05-05-2010, 7:04 PM
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/MovieLawyer/chopsticks.jpg

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http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/MovieLawyer/LinenThreadLg.jpg

=
Felony?

Yet another law brought to you by the Legislature who has seen too many movies.

Dr Rockso
05-05-2010, 7:04 PM
(3) As used in this section, a "nunchaku" means an instrument consisting of two or more sticks, clubs, bars or rods to be used as handles, connected by a rope, cord, wire, or chain, in the design of a weapon used in connection with the practice of a system of self-defense such as karate.
Sounds like you're good as long as the sticks aren't connected together. Oh how the other states must laugh at us for threads like this....

IEShooter
05-05-2010, 7:11 PM
These are illegal? They use them all the time at my son's Karate class. We bought him some from the Karate school and he just brought them home from class tonight.

He's only 5, so they're the padded foam ones, but he graduates to the wooden ones when he moves up a belt.

How is it they're illegal if they use and sell them in every Karate school?

Cokebottle
05-05-2010, 7:13 PM
These are illegal? They use them all the time at my son's Karate class. We bought him some from the Karate school and he just brought them home from class tonight.

He's only 5, so they're the padded foam ones, but he graduates to the wooden ones when he moves up a belt.

How is it they're illegal if they use and sell them in every Karate school?
They are legal under VERY tight restrictions, such as to and from class or competition only.

Don't let him practice with them in the front yard.

Dr Rockso
05-05-2010, 7:17 PM
These are illegal? They use them all the time at my son's Karate class. We bought him some from the Karate school and he just brought them home from class tonight.

He's only 5, so they're the padded foam ones, but he graduates to the wooden ones when he moves up a belt.

The only exception for nunchaku in 12020:
Subdivision (a) does not apply to any of the following
[...]
(3) The possession of a nunchaku on the premises of a school which holds a regulatory or business license and teaches the arts of self-defense.


How is it they're illegal if they use and sell them in every Karate school?

There's a lot of things that are illegal but rarely prosecuted for (unless you piss them off in some other manner). See BWO and the guy that got arrested driving through LAX for examples.

RomanDad
05-05-2010, 7:23 PM
Has anybody ever actually committed a CRIME with these? ANY WHERE? EVER? Ive seen some funny videos of people popping themselves in the nuts with them.... But I cant imagine anybody has ever robbed a liquor store with them.

IEShooter
05-05-2010, 7:27 PM
The only exception for nunchaku in 12020:




There's a lot of things that are illegal but rarely prosecuted for (unless you piss them off in some other manner). See BWO and the guy that got arrested driving through LAX for examples.

So, you're saying that they're technically illegal for him to have at home?!?!?

That doesn't sound reasonable. People walk in an out of the doors of the Karate school all day with these, as well as swords, long sticks with sharp curved knife looking things on the end (don't know what they're called) and lots of other implements that they train with.

They sell all of these at the school and people take them home, practice with them, go to competitions where they use them, etc..

ke6guj
05-05-2010, 7:34 PM
So, you're saying that they're technically illegal for him to have at home?!?!? yes, there is no exemption for possession at the home, even for karate students.

That doesn't sound reasonable. People walk in an out of the doors of the Karate school all day with these, as well as swords, long sticks with sharp curved knife looking things on the end (don't know what they're called) and lots of other implements that they train with.

They sell all of these at the school and people take them home, practice with them, go to competitions where they use them, etc..as mentioned above, there are many things that are illegally sold, but rarely prosecuted. Nothing illegal about possessing a sword, not sure about that other item.

b.faust
05-05-2010, 7:34 PM
Not that I suggest anyone do it, but you can find all kinds of this stuff openly displayed for sale in China Town up here in S.F.

Airsoft guns with no red/orange tip.
Throwing stars/knives/sporks
Nunchaka and a variety of other "Enter the Ninja" paraphernalia.

I suppose they have more to worry about than a couple of poorly made sticks which will end up hitting most people in the junk the first time they swing it.

ChrisTKHarris
05-05-2010, 7:36 PM
Are nunchuks illegal? I bought a couple pairs about 10 years ago online with no problems.

robcoe
05-05-2010, 7:37 PM
Has anybody ever actually committed a CRIME with these? ANY WHERE? EVER? Ive seen some funny videos of people popping themselves in the nuts with them.... But I cant imagine anybody has ever robbed a liquor store with them.

Your looking for sense where there is none. I cant think of anyone who has robbed a liquor store with a .50 BMG rifle either, but they are still illegal/restricted.

ke6guj
05-05-2010, 7:42 PM
Are nunchuks illegal? I bought a couple pairs about 10 years ago online with no problems.
yes, they are illegal.


12020. (a) Any person in this state who does any of the following is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or in the state prison:
(1) Manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state, keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends, or possesses any cane gun or wallet gun, any undetectable firearm, any firearm which is not immediately recognizable as a firearm, any camouflaging firearm container, any ammunition which contains or consists of any flechette dart, any bullet containing or carrying an explosive agent, any ballistic knife, any multiburst trigger activator, any nunchaku, any short-barreled shotgun, any short-barreled rifle, any metal knuckles, any belt buckle knife, any leaded cane, any zip gun, any shuriken, any unconventional pistol, any lipstick case knife, any cane sword, any shobi-zue, any air gauge knife, any writing pen knife, any metal military practice handgrenade or metal replica handgrenade, or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a blackjack, slungshot, billy, sandclub, sap, or sandbag.

(c)(3) As used in this section, a "nunchaku" means an instrument consisting of two or more sticks, clubs, bars or rods to be used as handles, connected by a rope, cord, wire, or chain, in the design of a weapon used in connection with the practice of a system of self-defense such as karate.

Dr Rockso
05-05-2010, 7:46 PM
So, you're saying that they're technically illegal for him to have at home?!?!?

That doesn't sound reasonable. People walk in an out of the doors of the Karate school all day with these, as well as swords, long sticks with sharp curved knife looking things on the end (don't know what they're called) and lots of other implements that they train with.

They sell all of these at the school and people take them home, practice with them, go to competitions where they use them, etc..

Like I said, it's rarely prosecuted. Just hope you never end up in a firearm-related misunderstanding because the 12020 charge is the one they can actually make stick.

Read this (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=79110), particularly:

By now you will probably all have heard the good news. All of the charges in the criminal complaint against Matt have been dropped. There were twelve charges in all, six for possession or selling 1919 belt-fed firearms, three for possession of assault weapons (legally-configured OLL's), one for possession of stolen government property, and two for non-firearm "karate" weapons (shuriken and weighted gloves). As we all know, 1919's are as legal as double-barreled shotguns, so there was never really anything to charge him with there. The DA's office, in their generosity, agreed to drop those six charges pretty much right away. The "stolen" government property was Matt's all along, left over from his service in the army, and in the end the DA graciously agreed to drop that charge as well. The OLL felony charges were dropped in favor of a civil compromise, where the state confiscates the rifles but then does not charge Matt with anything that will later affect his firearms rights or his employment prospects. (More on this later, in a subsequent post.) The DA also agreed to drop the "karate" weapons charges.

Everything he had was perfectly legal except the shuriken (and, arguably the weighted gloves). Still cost $10k and he was in jail for 3 weeks.

RomanDad
05-05-2010, 10:14 PM
Your looking for sense where there is none. I cant think of anyone who has robbed a liquor store with a .50 BMG rifle either, but they are still illegal/restricted.

To the best of my knowledge, the only crime in the country to ever involve a .50, was Waco.

destro360
05-05-2010, 10:26 PM
kind of funny to spend all that time learning to use them for self defense where in reality if used would land you in prison and a felony ;) isn't that cool? lol

SPaikmos
05-05-2010, 11:14 PM
These are illegal? They use them all the time at my son's Karate class. We bought him some from the Karate school and he just brought them home from class tonight.

He's only 5, so they're the padded foam ones, but he graduates to the wooden ones when he moves up a belt.

How is it they're illegal if they use and sell them in every Karate school?

As others have said, it is a felony to POSSESS nunchaku in CA. I've heard of two people that have been prosecuted for this. One in SF (don't have a reference), and the other is this guy:

http://homepages.nyu.edu/~jmm257/mvc.html

He is a lawyer that is currently fighting the MAN in NYC. Not Kali, but they have similar laws.

IIRC, nunchaku are illegal in NY, MA, and CA. This reference also mentions AZ but I haven't heard of it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nunchaku

Martial arts is a sticky situation. I teach classes in SD county and have heard that it is legal for students to have them, but not so sure. The PC mentioned earlier is the law, where it is legal in the school / dojo / dojang but not at home. Most online stores won't even sell the foam ones to you if you live in CA. I'm sure you can find local places that will sell them, but just be informed that it is technically a felony and you should exercise some common sense around it.

kf6tac
05-05-2010, 11:43 PM
(3) As used in this section, a "nunchaku" means an instrument consisting of two or more sticks, clubs, bars or rods to be used as handles, connected by a rope, cord, wire, or chain, in the design of a weapon used in connection with the practice of a system of self-defense such as karate.

Kind of sickening that they specifically call out the fact that the banned item is used in the practice of a system of SELF-DEFENSE. Proverbial salt in the wound.

Dr Rockso
05-05-2010, 11:59 PM
As others have said, it is a felony to POSSESS nunchaku in CA. I've heard of two people that have been prosecuted for this. One in SF (don't have a reference), and the other is this guy:
As far as I'm aware it's not necessarily a felony (it's a wobbler, which can be prosecuted as either misdemanor or felony).

Forestgnome
05-06-2010, 6:58 AM
I thought felonies were basically crimes that had sentences >1 year attached. That's why they specify <1 year. Am I wrong?

Mulay El Raisuli
05-06-2010, 8:02 AM
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/MovieLawyer/chopsticks.jpg

+

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/MovieLawyer/LinenThreadLg.jpg

=
Felony?

Yet another law brought to you by the Legislature who has seen too many movies.


TOO funny! Laughing so hard....falling from chair.....hitting desk on way down.....dying.......


The Rai

The Director
05-06-2010, 8:31 AM
At my club it works on a different principle. Weapons aren't taught to students until they reach black belt level.

Upon reaching black belt, You start with Nunchaku. I am a 2nd degree black so we are on swords. The club actually SELLS nunchaku, they sell two types: foam for the kidees or total noobs, and steel ones linked with chains (no bearings). These are REQUIRED for the curriculum - you cannot advance to the next level without mastering the Nunchaku. We do and have taken them off premises - you simply cannot master them without tons of home practice.

Having said that, they reside in a duffel bag that has a mouthguard, head protector, shin pads, and uniform with club markings.....

Also, we're issued ID cards by the World Tae Kwon Do federation that has our rank and picture.


I for one am aware of what the letter of the law states...I'm just hoping that if I get caught with them (and it would only be TO or FROM the club), I could demonstrate that I was a WTF licensed martial artist in transit and that it would be enough to mollify the cop.......not that I would ever consent to a search.

Having said all of that, I couldn't think of a more useless weapon in combat.....and I say that as a master of Nunchaku.....

yeah, it hurts when you get hit with them but most people don't realize that when you strike with a nunchaku, and it hits it's target, it tends to rebound wherever the hell it wants, sometimes striking the user.

It's an intimidating weapon, and looks bad azz...I could probably hospitalize someone with a set of 'chucks, but it would not be my first choice....


Oh, and needless to say - NEVER USE THEM FOR SELF DEFENSE. You'd be better off shooting the guy....really.....

SPaikmos
05-06-2010, 8:39 AM
I thought felonies were basically crimes that had sentences >1 year attached. That's why they specify <1 year. Am I wrong?

My bad. Somehow I got it in my head that it was a felony, but you are probably right. I don't have a definitive answer, so throw it out as FUD.

Agree that nunchaku are basically useless in combat.

CHS
05-06-2010, 9:06 AM
I made a pair of Nunchuku out of a couple of AR pistols once. As I read the law, it's perfectly legal.

Probably a hundred times more deadly, too.

Bugei
05-06-2010, 10:18 AM
Not that I suggest anyone do it, but you can find all kinds of this stuff openly displayed for sale in China Town up here in S.F.

Airsoft guns with no red/orange tip.
Throwing stars/knives/sporks
Nunchaka and a variety of other "Enter the Ninja" paraphernalia.

I suppose they have more to worry about than a couple of poorly made sticks which will end up hitting most people in the junk the first time they swing it.

I totally need three or four throwing sporks.

curtisfong
05-06-2010, 11:13 AM
Kind of sickening that they specifically call out the fact that the banned item is used in the practice of a system of SELF-DEFENSE. Proverbial salt in the wound.

This has GOT to be challengable post McDonald. I find it infuriating that they specifically chose this phrasing.

MichaelKent
05-06-2010, 12:34 PM
It's kind of silly that Nunchaku are illegal... Without training, they're more likely to injure the person using them - meanwhile the people who are trained aren't likely to use them offensively.

If they were legal, then the morons who try to mug people with them would probably wind up knocking themselves out. ;)


Having said all of that, I couldn't think of a more useless weapon in combat.....and I say that as a master of Nunchaku.....

yeah, it hurts when you get hit with them but most people don't realize that when you strike with a nunchaku, and it hits it's target, it tends to rebound wherever the hell it wants, sometimes striking the user.

What are you hitting them against? Hitting people with foam chucks or hitting solid targets with the wooden/metal ones aren't quite the same as hitting a person. A solid metal or wooden nuchaku usually won't rebound much when it comes into contact with a softer target that gives way (like a human body) - it's simple physics with force and momentum. A soft body part or something that will be pushed away (like a head) will absorb/dissipate much of the force.

However, as they discovered on the show Deadliest Warrior (which is pretty bad at comparing warriors but cool for comparing weapons), the Nunchaku can crack a skull in 3 hits and does good damage... but isn't as effective as a baseball bat. :p

Ron-Solo
05-06-2010, 1:13 PM
Nunchaku are arrestable as FELONY but are usually prosecuted as a misdemeanor. I've made many arrests for them over the years, but I never encountered a legitimate martial arts student with them. It seems most people dedicated to the martial arts also follow the laws and aren't buttheads when LE encounters them.

Everyone I arrested was a major tool and deserved the ride to jail. I did arrest a lawyer for bringing a set into a courthouse once. That was prosecuted as a felony and he was convicted.

Nunchaku can be extremely dangerous if someone who really knows how to use them decides to do bad things. They are very hard to defend against when used properly. A police baton is no match for them.

Dr Rockso
05-06-2010, 1:20 PM
Nunchaku can be extremely dangerous if someone who really knows how to use them decides to do bad things. They are very hard to defend against when used properly. A police baton is no match for them.
Frankly if someone is skilled enough to use nunchaku effectively, the average police officer with a baton wouldn't be much of a match for them anyway...

Still a stupid law that is designed around the notion of selective prosecution.

till44
05-06-2010, 1:22 PM
I made a pair of Nunchuku out of a couple of AR pistols once. As I read the law, it's perfectly legal.

Probably a hundred times more deadly, too.

I need a pair of those!

hollabillz
05-06-2010, 1:32 PM
This is just more blatant anti-mall-ninja legislature. :mad: ;)

ke6guj
05-06-2010, 1:32 PM
Everyone I arrested was a major tool and deserved the ride to jail. I did arrest a lawyer for bringing a set into a courthouse once. That was prosecuted as a felony and he was convicted.
why did he bring them to the courthouse? As an exibit in a court case?

Merc1138
05-06-2010, 1:55 PM
why did he bring them to the courthouse? As an exibit in a court case?

LOL, that reminded me of the courthouse in Fremont about 10 years ago. A friend of mine needed to pay a ticket, I went along with because I had nothing better to do, get to the x-ray machine and metal detector, and they had pictures up of items they had confiscated from people trying to take them into the courthouse.

Scissors
Knives
Screwdrivers
Nunchaku
Shuriken(a ton of shuriken)
Shanks/shivs/etc

The fact that someone had tried to bring nunchaku into a courthouse was bad enough, but the number of different types of shuriken in the pictures was ridiculous.

And I've always been under the impression that nunchaku weren't a great weapon. They rebound, require tons of practice just to not hurt yourself waving them around(no way the average street thug is going to effectively use them), and just seemed to be flashy more than anything else.

tiki
05-06-2010, 2:15 PM
Nunchuku don't kill people, Ninjas do.

The Director
05-06-2010, 2:37 PM
Nunchaku can be extremely dangerous if someone who really knows how to use them decides to do bad things. They are very hard to defend against when used properly. A police baton is no match for them.

I'd have to agree....two Nunchaku going off in each hand does tend to throw up a wall of metal.

A police baton is a no go against them; a Bo staff works pretty well.

The Director
05-06-2010, 2:40 PM
What are you hitting them against? Hitting people with foam chucks or hitting solid targets with the wooden/metal ones aren't quite the same as hitting a person. A solid metal or wooden nuchaku usually won't rebound much when it comes into contact with a softer target that gives way (like a human body) - it's simple physics with force and momentum. A soft body part or something that will be pushed away (like a head) will absorb/dissipate much of the force.


I never learned on the foam ones. They're for kids. The metal ones we use rebound lots, and in two years of mastering them, I've hit myself plenty of times to see exactly how they bounce.

As I said, they are effective, and I could hospitalize someone with a set, but it would not be my first choice of weapon.

Also, because of fear of prosecution, I'd never draw them in self defense....well...almost....I'd pretty much have to be in a life and death situation.


Edited: by the way....these heavy wood and metal ones with bearings are junk. The real ones are hollow metal because speed and recovery time are important in the strike. They feel good to a novice when they are very heavy, but the key is to get the light metal ones because they are very, very fast, and they don't throw lots of weight forward.....when you've struck with the chuck, you are vulnerable until you retract it. The lighter they are, the faster they whip back. Heavy ones are good for one blow before your opponent clobbers you.

IEShooter
05-06-2010, 2:51 PM
I posted my question, not because I'm interested in whether they're effective self defense weapons or not. My son is five and regardless of his age, would never be carrying them around. They're taught to use them as it is a traditional weapon of Karate, not because they expect to ever use them in self defense. As stated, they aren't practical to carry around.

I posted because I was shocked to hear that they're illegal, particularly since his Karate school uses them every single day!!!! Yesterday, there were 30 kids standing there practicing their nunchakas. Most of them (including my son) had bought the $10 set of tiny padded ones they teach the kids with.

Every one of those kids have them at home and practice with them. They carry them to and from the class and to the parking lot. The school sells them along with the hard, wooden ones made for adults. The adults and big kids in the next class were practicing with their wooden ones.

We're there twice a week and I see dozens of them walking in and out the front door in the hands of kids and their parents.

All of us are driving around with these in our vehicles to and from the school. I'm sure some folks just leave them in the vehicle rather than cart them into the house each time.

This is nuts!!!!

b.faust
05-06-2010, 2:53 PM
I totally need three or four throwing sporks.

I know! Right?!

Of course I started looking to see if there was such a thing. Sadly no.
(I'll let you know when I come up with some)

Also, on a side note, I recall when these were first in the press getting a bad rap in the 80's (around the time of the ninja movie craze)
I seem to remember they were mostly being used by people (i.e. criminals/gang types) not as a striking device, but as a very effective choking device, which lead people to get freaked out about them.

(Anyone who's used these like this, or done Judo/Jujitsu with a cross lapel choke knows what I'm talking about.)

windrider
05-06-2010, 4:43 PM
holy crap nunchucks are illegal, what the hell is going on seriously this is just ridiculous, in five years a pen is going to be illegal unless you are going to or from a piece of paper, we all should pitch in and build a space ship and get the out of here, lets hit the moon up, untill we are ready to strike muhahaha.

liberty08
05-06-2010, 5:10 PM
http://henryschrof.com/schrof.jpg

elSquid
05-06-2010, 5:10 PM
I'd have to agree....two Nunchaku going off in each hand does tend to throw up a wall of metal.

A police baton is a no go against them; a Bo staff works pretty well.

As does 40S&W, though I'd prefer a 12 gauge.

-- Michael

The Director
05-06-2010, 5:51 PM
As does 40S&W, though I'd prefer a 12 gauge.

-- Michael

My Nunchucks are full auto. You'd need at least two 12 guages to even come close. :p

IEShooter
05-06-2010, 8:40 PM
Sorry folks. My bad.... As a parent, I posted a serious question in a forum frequented by what appears to be 12 year olds.

I won't make that mistake again.

Regards,

John

RomanDad
05-06-2010, 9:48 PM
Sorry folks. My bad.... As a parent, I posted a serious question in a forum frequented by what appears to be 12 year olds.

I won't make that mistake again.

Regards,

John

Lighten up.... Sometimes all you can do is laugh at our stupid laws.... Otherwise you would cry.

b.faust
05-06-2010, 10:28 PM
Sorry folks. My bad.... As a parent, I posted a serious question in a forum frequented by what appears to be 12 year olds.

I won't make that mistake again.

Regards,

John

It was my throwing spork comment that put you over the edge wasn't it?

Ron-Solo
05-06-2010, 10:50 PM
why did he bring them to the courthouse? As an exibit in a court case?

Nope. Self-defense. He wasn't even a good enough lawyer to know to keep his mouth shut. There are procedures in place for bringing evidence into a courthouse, but this wasn't the case. The funny thing is, he was a regular visitor and was always a jerk to the security staff. Karma

Ron-Solo
05-06-2010, 10:53 PM
I thought felonies were basically crimes that had sentences >1 year attached. That's why they specify <1 year. Am I wrong?

If it mentions "state prison" in the possible punishments, it is a felony. You don't get sentenced to State Prison for less than a year.

SPaikmos
05-06-2010, 11:04 PM
It was my throwing spork comment that put you over the edge wasn't it?

I loved the spork comment! Throwing spork would be cool!

John: on a serious note, yes, they are technically illegal and you can get busted for it. Apparently you didn't know that before, so you learned something useful, eh? As I see it, you've got 2 options:

1) Don't use them.
2) Accept that it's illegal and use some DISCRETION and COMMON SENSE around nunchaku.

I understand your son is 5, but maybe you could use this to educate him about the finer points of the laws of this state, and to be discreet when discussing the subject with friends or strangers. You could even introduce him to the idea of breaking the law and why he's doing it, but maybe he's a bit young to grasp that one.

As he advances in the martial arts, I'm sure you'll be violating conceal carry laws for knives at some point. God forbid your son accidentally brings a 6" tanto to school cause he'll be going to martial arts after class and a teacher sees it! If you want to be safe, teach him the cane. You can never get into trouble with that weapon, and it's a lot more useful than nunchaku.

The average person commits 3 felonies a day. IMHO, the legal system is a total cluster **** and needs to be overhauled. Common sense and reason were stamped out long ago. In general, don't do stupid **** and the popo won't harass you, and life is good.

If you're gonna get bent out of shape about the humor introduced into this thread, you really need to chill a bit. Besides, the original post was about nunchaku rebuild kits, which was waiting to be made fun of...

Mulay El Raisuli
05-07-2010, 6:38 AM
I seem to remember they were mostly being used by people (i.e. criminals/gang types) not as a striking device, but as a very effective choking device, which lead people to get freaked out about them.

(Anyone who's used these like this, or done Judo/Jujitsu with a cross lapel choke knows what I'm talking about.)


Interestingly, the San Diego PD carried (carries still?) nunchakus for choking people out & inflicting "pain compliance" on those who just don't obey.


The Raisuli

paradox
05-07-2010, 9:36 AM
Sorry folks. My bad.... As a parent, I posted a serious question in a forum frequented by what appears to be 12 year olds.

I won't make that mistake again.

Regards,

John

Way to get butt hurt.

Your questions were answered in detail quite early. The law was posted. It isn't hard to understand. Yes, you are committing a felony for having nunchucks in your home. So is everyone else in class. It's stupid and hardly ever enforced. But, if the SWAT team mistakes your address for the crack head down the street, busts in, shoots your dog and prones your kid at gunpoint, you can be damn sure they'll charge you for the nunchucks to prove that what they did was OK, after all you are a felon who is contributing to the delinquency of a minor...

Yeah laws and law enforcement in this state/country is that ****ed up. It is a good teachable moment.

Wherryj
05-07-2010, 6:58 PM
Has anybody ever actually committed a CRIME with these? ANY WHERE? EVER? Ive seen some funny videos of people popping themselves in the nuts with them.... But I cant imagine anybody has ever robbed a liquor store with them.

Having trained with them in my martial arts days, I can say that they are deadly...so long as your assailant decides to stay within range and doesn't run away.

Additionally, they are also deadly unless the assailant counters with anything other than a short bladed or blunt object. Even the original use, disarming a sword carrying opponent, isn't really a good idea. It was only because carrying a sword or other military implement was banned for the populace.

It is my personal opinion that Nunchuku were so strictly banned based on movies rather than reality. Knives are far more plentiful and dangerous. This is non-unlike the weapon bans based on 80s action movies.

Wherryj
05-07-2010, 7:13 PM
At my club it works on a different principle. Weapons aren't taught to students until they reach black belt level.

Upon reaching black belt, You start with Nunchaku. I am a 2nd degree black so we are on swords. The club actually SELLS nunchaku, they sell two types: foam for the kidees or total noobs, and steel ones linked with chains (no bearings). These are REQUIRED for the curriculum - you cannot advance to the next level without mastering the Nunchaku. We do and have taken them off premises - you simply cannot master them without tons of home practice.

Having said that, they reside in a duffel bag that has a mouthguard, head protector, shin pads, and uniform with club markings.....

Also, we're issued ID cards by the World Tae Kwon Do federation that has our rank and picture.


I for one am aware of what the letter of the law states...I'm just hoping that if I get caught with them (and it would only be TO or FROM the club), I could demonstrate that I was a WTF licensed martial artist in transit and that it would be enough to mollify the cop.......not that I would ever consent to a search.

Having said all of that, I couldn't think of a more useless weapon in combat.....and I say that as a master of Nunchaku.....

yeah, it hurts when you get hit with them but most people don't realize that when you strike with a nunchaku, and it hits it's target, it tends to rebound wherever the hell it wants, sometimes striking the user.

It's an intimidating weapon, and looks bad azz...I could probably hospitalize someone with a set of 'chucks, but it would not be my first choice....


Oh, and needless to say - NEVER USE THEM FOR SELF DEFENSE. You'd be better off shooting the guy....really.....

Sorry, but I didn't get to your post before I added my own. It appears that we have similar thoughts about nunchaku. My shorinji dojo had similar traditions, although I can't say that I became very proficient with nunchaku. I was able to train on the katana without mastery fortunately.

Even with a folded steel katana, I'd say that there are far better means of self defense. One finger kung-fu is far more effective and less likely to leave someone who may disagree with your story to the police.

Wherryj
05-07-2010, 7:18 PM
My Nunchucks are full auto. You'd need at least two 12 guages to even come close. :p

I think I'd rather take my chances with this:
http://i759.photobucket.com/albums/xx238/wherryj/IMG00029-20100421-191054-1.jpg

None of my nunchaku has a torch on the end. Safety first, one must always know where one's target is located...That and it's legal to possess and use.

gunsmith
05-07-2010, 8:33 PM
Your looking for sense where there is none. I cant think of anyone who has robbed a liquor store with a .50 BMG rifle either, but they are still illegal/restricted.

yup, illegal!!! felony!!!

its my generations fault, Bruce Lee, Enter The Dragon - started a huge craze for chuks, every kid in my neighborhood used them to beat up other kids and them selves, I love em, just got done working out with mine ( currently in NV where the NRS only says you cant carry for malicious purposes ) basically its the same thinking as switch blades in the 50's ... if the young hoodlums like em they ban em

gunsmith
05-07-2010, 8:37 PM
oh yeah, like the gent said- not great for self defense but a good workout for the shoulder muscles , I've found it really helps my blocking too

mswanson223
05-07-2010, 9:05 PM
I made miniture a nunchku at work. I work at a true value so theres building material left over after we do custom work for customers. two dolle pieces and small amount of low grade chain.