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View Full Version : What's the purpose of incendiary ammo?


davy
04-24-2010, 3:26 PM
What's the function of these rounds?

http://www.ammunitiontogo.com/catalog1/product_info.php/pName/20rds-223-super-incendiary-ammo

I would imagine they would be THE BEST defense rounds because they actually burn upon impact?

Would make an awful mess, but still, can't imagine anybody would be able to keep on fighting after getting shot with one of these?

Will these foul up the gun? Are these legal?

Cobrafreak
04-24-2010, 3:35 PM
Shorter barrel life I suppose as ignited magnesium can burn through everything on the planet. They are to catch things on fire. Probably against Geneva Convention rules to shoot humans with. Would hurt like HE LL!

armygunsmith
04-24-2010, 3:36 PM
Not legal in CA as far as I know. They do have a may uses though. Sometimes they are used for marking targets, but generally they are used to engage targets where a secondary explosion is desired.

ChrisTKHarris
04-24-2010, 3:55 PM
Light crap on fire.

davy
04-24-2010, 4:19 PM
So these are NOT legal in CA.

Can anybody confirm this?

sd1023x
04-24-2010, 4:26 PM
Incendiary & tracer ammo illegal in CA.....considered 'destructive devices'.

davy
04-24-2010, 4:30 PM
Thanks, won't get to play with those than.

bubbapug1
06-30-2010, 9:17 AM
So a 750 grain bullet traveling at 2800 feet is not a destructive device on its own??

Kodemonkey
06-30-2010, 9:23 AM
Yeah, incendiary rounds and dry brush are just a bad idea. In all the canyons I shoot, there is at least something waiting to go ablaze.

As others have pointed out they are illegal in CA anyway. And I believe that is probably the reason for it. There is some common sense in that law.

John Sukey
06-30-2010, 9:58 AM
But don't confuse the two. One starts fires and the other one lets you know where the bullet is going.

CSACANNONEER
06-30-2010, 10:07 AM
They would SUCK as SD rounds. They do not ignite until they hit a hard object. They are made to penetrate hard objects and explode. I have a piece of 3/8 mild steel that one did not completely penetrate at 1000 yards. So, they are not going to penetrate heavy armor at long distances.

Incendiary & tracer ammo illegal in CA.....considered 'destructive devices'.

Not all tracer rounds are illegal in Ca! I have a couple of cases of 12g tracers and they are California legal!!!!!

So a 750 grain bullet traveling at 2800 feet is not a destructive device on its own??

50BMG API and incindary rounds are not 750 grain bullets.

But don't confuse the two. One starts fires and the other one lets you know where the bullet is going.

They can both start fires. Tracers have probably started more fires than Incindaries and APIs have.

stormy_clothing
06-30-2010, 1:17 PM
let me just say that public or private use of these in CA is not recommended, legal or not it's a whole other world of perception.

Connor P Price
06-30-2010, 2:00 PM
BRQqieimwLQ

It's a heat seeking bullet! DUH!

Iggy
06-30-2010, 2:11 PM
It's a heat seeking bullet! DUH!

Haha, man people are so misinformed...

Omega13device
06-30-2010, 3:00 PM
A little bit of trivia...in WWII our fighter planes used .50 cal incendiary rounds to great effect against enemy aircraft. Just one through the gas tank and bye bye.

CSACANNONEER
06-30-2010, 3:09 PM
A little bit of trivia...in WWII our fighter planes used .50 cal incendiary rounds to great effect against enemy aircraft. Just one through the gas tank and bye bye.

I guess hitting the fuel tank was another issue. Otherwise, Pearl Harbor would have ended differently. Right? Yea, I know that we were no ready for them but, more than one M2 was fired at the Japenese aircrafts with very few going down or exploding from being hit.

Super Spy
06-30-2010, 3:20 PM
I guess hitting the fuel tank was another issue. Otherwise, Pearl Harbor would have ended differently. Right? Yea, I know that we were no ready for them but, more than one M2 was fired at the Japenese aircrafts with very few going down or exploding from being hit.

I wouldn't count on the M2's fired in Pearl Harbor being loaded with incendiary rounds.....Japanese Zero's have no armor, don't have self sealing tanks, and are made with paper.......they burn real well. I don't think they were expecting the Japanese coming for Christmas or they would have been ready with our own special brand of Christmas lights.

Kodemonkey
06-30-2010, 3:25 PM
It's a heat seeking bullet! DUH!

Wow. Who writes the talking points for these people? :eek:

tacticalcity
06-30-2010, 3:28 PM
Originally Posted by Davidoff
LOL, so justice is a unicycle? I can see the analogy. Requires balance and skill to maneuver, yet usually used by clowns...


My experience tells me it is a unicyle that somebody stole the seat from. Because I almost always end up taking it up the...

CSACANNONEER
06-30-2010, 3:28 PM
I wouldn't count on the M2's fired in Pearl Harbor being loaded with incendiary rounds.....Japanese Zero's have no armor, don't have self sealing tanks, and are made with paper.......they burn real well. I don't think they were expecting the Japanese coming for Christmas or they would have been ready with our own special brand of Christmas lights.

Without researching it, I'm going to assume that they had APIs and tracers on the belts They may have had Ball and APs too.

Lead-Thrower
06-30-2010, 3:42 PM
So a 750 grain bullet traveling at 2800 feet is not a destructive device on its own??

WTF kind of gun do you shoot? :59: :36: :21:

sideshowhr
06-30-2010, 3:46 PM
Default What's the purpose of incendiary ammo?

awesomeness?

tacticalcity
06-30-2010, 3:52 PM
I assumed he wasn't asking about tracers per say but rather ammo designed to catch the target on fire. A lot of artillery and tank shells are incenderary rounds as are a lot of 50 BMG rounds. They are meant more for engaging vehicles and aircraft than people.

However, if he is asking about tracers, they are used to correct and/or direct fire.

As part of a Mobile Aerial Port we usually had at least one magazine loaded with trackers every 3-5 rounds. Made directing the fire of the others much easier, and it was a very quick way of not only communicating that you were under attack, but where the bad guys were attacking from. Thankfully I only used this technique in training. While I did deploy on real world missions, the guys were supporting were to good at their jobs to lead the bad guys back to our location. Or if our location was known, the enemy would not risk an international incident by crossing the border of a neighboring country to get to us. It wasn't like it is today in Afghanistan or Iraq. Even Bosnia was considerably safer, or at least we felt safer.

Examples of common uses for tracers.

A) CORRECTING YOUR OWN FIRE: Allows a spotter to see where you are shooting and give you instructions to adjust your aim until you are on target. This works well when you are part of a squad or fire team, or when using a heavy machine gun, and comes in very handy when engaging a target or targets a good distance away.

B) DIRECTING FIRE OF OTHERS: In addition to my own personal example above, you could uses them to direct an air strike. If you have aircraft over head you are trying to direct to perform an air strike and they cannot find your target and you do not have grid coordinates or GPS coordinates you can shoot off a few tracer rounds at the target, or in the direction of your target to help get them searching in the right direction. Think a downed pilot being surrounded by the enemy and supported by low flying aircraft like Sandies. He has to quickly identify threats to planes moving very quickly over the area. If the bad guys don't shot at him, and are under cover and concealment, the pilot is going to need help figuring out where to drop his bombs and where to shoot his cannons. He has to find them quickly, as each pass burns fule, and there is no telling what other assets may be available. This of course, presumes the pilot has tracers in the first place. Thankfully today we have all kinds of technology to make finding the bad guys much easier. Back in my day, the early 1990s we still did things much the same way we did in Vietnam.

It is important to note that while they put on a heck of show for others, they don't do much for you the shooter visually. You see your sights, not the pretty color moving across the sky. For those watching, it is like the 4th of July.

bjl333
06-30-2010, 4:10 PM
BRQqieimwLQ

It's a heat seeking bullet! DUH!



Now why didn't I think of that ?!?!? Could've patented it and made millions !!! Oh .... what, she was misinformed !!! OKAY ... now I can invent a heat seeking bullet !! FOR HUNTING DEERS .....

straykiller
06-30-2010, 4:31 PM
[/IMG]BRQqieimwLQ

It's a heat seeking bullet! DUH!

dammit you beat me to it


be careful of the shoulder things that go up also.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rGpykAX1fo&feature=related

ArkinDomino
06-30-2010, 6:02 PM
To kill stuff with FIRE!

Colt-45
06-30-2010, 6:22 PM
Yeah, incendiary rounds and dry brush are just a bad idea. In all the canyons I shoot, there is at least something waiting to go ablaze.

As others have pointed out they are illegal in CA anyway. And I believe that is probably the reason for it. There is some common sense in that law.

I disagree. These laws are passed based on the "too scary to own" factor. Anti gun politicians use NO common sense.

slomofo
06-30-2010, 6:53 PM
Heat seeking incendiary rounds combined with the shoulder thing that goes up would make a person unstoppable.

bjl333
06-30-2010, 7:02 PM
Heat seeking incendiary rounds combined with the shoulder thing that goes up would make a person unstoppable.



I'll take it !!!

Anchors
06-30-2010, 7:37 PM
[/IMG]

dammit you beat me to it


be careful of the shoulder things that go up also.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rGpykAX1fo&feature=related

"I believe it is a shoulder thing that goes up."
"No. It is not."

Owned haha.

Eargasm
06-30-2010, 8:10 PM
But don't confuse the two. One starts fires and the other one lets you know where the bullet is going.

And where it came from.

Omega13device
06-30-2010, 8:24 PM
I guess hitting the fuel tank was another issue. Otherwise, Pearl Harbor would have ended differently. Right? Yea, I know that we were no ready for them but, more than one M2 was fired at the Japenese aircrafts with very few going down or exploding from being hit.
I said fighter planes.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a7/Bott4.jpg/785px-Bott4.jpg

Josh3239
06-30-2010, 9:04 PM
I would imagine they would be THE BEST defense rounds because they actually burn upon impact?

If your plan is to burn the house down with the bad guy still in it, than yes it would make a great HD round! :D

Plisk
06-30-2010, 9:17 PM
Think of them like mini RPGs, they go boom when they hit hard things. But instead of ordnance, it just burns its way through stuff. Even with tracers and incendiary, it does not affect barrel life. The extra components in the tip of the bullet do not even touch the barrel. They don't burn the barrel either since incendiary only ignites on impact, and tracer needs 25 yard+ish of air friction to ignite.

Quiet
06-30-2010, 10:43 PM
So these are NOT legal in CA.

Can anybody confirm this?

All explosive, incendiary and tracer (except shotgun tracers) ammo is illegal in CA [PC 12301(a)(1)].



Penal Code 12301
(a) The term "destructive device," as used in this chapter, shall include any of the following weapons:
(1) Any projectile containing any explosive or incendiary material or any other chemical substance, including, but not limited to, that which is commonly known as tracer or incendiary ammunition, except tracer ammunition manufactured for use in shotguns.
(2) Any bomb, grenade, explosive missile, or similar device or any launching device therefor.
(3) Any weapon of a caliber greater than 0.60 caliber which fires fixed ammunition, or any ammunition therefor, other than a shotgun (smooth or rifled bore) conforming to the definition of a "destructive device" found in subsection (b) of Section 479.11 of Title 27 of the Code of Federal Regulations, shotgun ammunition (single projectile or shot), antique rifle, or an antique cannon. For purposes of this section, the term "antique cannon" means any cannon manufactured before January 1, 1899, which has been rendered incapable of firing or for which ammunition is no longer manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade. The term "antique rifle" means a firearm conforming to the definition of an "antique firearm" in Section 479.11 of Title 27 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(4) Any rocket, rocket-propelled projectile, or similar device of a diameter greater than 0.60 inch, or any launching device therefor, and any rocket, rocket-propelled projectile, or similar device containing any explosive or incendiary material or any other chemical substance, other than the propellant for that device, except those devices as are designed primarily for emergency or distress signaling purposes.
(5) Any breakable container which contains a flammable liquid with a flashpoint of 150 degrees Fahrenheit or less and has a wick or similar device capable of being ignited, other than a device which is commercially manufactured primarily for the purpose of illumination.
(6) Any sealed device containing dry ice (CO2) or other chemically reactive substances assembled for the purpose of causing an explosion by a chemical reaction.
(b) The term "explosive," as used in this chapter, shall mean any explosive defined in Section 12000 of the Health and Safety Code.