PDA

View Full Version : WHEN DID PPT BECAME MANDATORY?


gemini1
04-23-2010, 6:53 PM
I am shooting a Marlin 60 that my late dad owned. From what he told me before he passed away, was that rifle was sold to him by his cousin who had left the country permanently. I was'nt really interested with this rifle before as I prefer pistols, so I never bothered to ask him if the transfer was done through a FFL. I've migrated to the country 15 years ago and I've seen this rifle that he kept, so I assumed the transfer happened more than 15 years ago.

So when did PPT through an FFL became mandatory? If this has been on going much earlier than 15 years ago, is there any way I can find out if the did the transfer legally? (my uncle passed away much earlier than my dad).

Thanks

E Pluribus Unum
04-23-2010, 7:09 PM
I am shooting a Marlin 60 that my late dad owned. From what he told me before he passed away, was that rifle was sold to him by his cousin who had left the country permanently. I was'nt really interested with this rifle before as I prefer pistols, so I never bothered to ask him if the transfer was done through a FFL. I've migrated to the country 15 years ago and I've seen this rifle that he kept, so I assumed the transfer happened more than 15 years ago.

So when did PPT through an FFL became mandatory? If this has been on going much earlier than 15 years ago, is there any way I can find out if the did the transfer legally? (my uncle passed away much earlier than my dad).

Thanks

01-01-1991....


There are exceptions...

Rifles older than 50 years.

Transfers from mother/father----son/daughter

So... if your uncle gave it to your grandfather, and the grandfather gave it to your dad, and your dad gave it to you... no transfer required and the government would never know.


Also....


Long gun records are destroyed 30 days after the purchase, so the government doesn't know when/where the firearm was purchased.

if they have the serial number, they can track it to the gun store that bought it, and that dealer will have the original DROS paperwork, but without the gun, the government has no idea who bought it. The DROS will only have the original buyer, it will not have any record of a family transfer, or a lawfull face to face transfer that happened before 1-1-91.

ke6guj
04-23-2010, 7:10 PM
it doesn't really matter in your case.

What transfers happened inthe past with that rifle don't come into play (unless it was reported stolen at some point). the transfer from your father, or his estate, to you is a paperless transfer, no PPT needed. Just enjoy your late father's rifle.

gemini1
04-23-2010, 7:45 PM
Cool. Thanks guys.

Saigon1965
04-23-2010, 9:57 PM
Oh how I miss the old days of horse trading -

Shady
04-23-2010, 10:04 PM
what falls in the category of long gun

E Pluribus Unum
04-23-2010, 10:16 PM
what falls in the category of long gun

Anything other than a handgun.

Librarian
04-23-2010, 10:59 PM
And since I suspect someone will ask, 'handgun' is defined in PC 12001:12001. (a) (1) As used in this title, the terms "pistol,"
"revolver," and "firearm capable of being concealed upon the person"
shall apply to and include any device designed to be used as a
weapon, from which is expelled a projectile by the force of any
explosion, or other form of combustion, and that has a barrel less
than 16 inches in length. These terms also include any device that
has a barrel 16 inches or more in length which is designed to be
interchanged with a barrel less than 16 inches in length.
(2) As used in this title, the term "handgun" means any "pistol,"
"revolver," or "firearm capable of being concealed upon the person."
(b) As used in this title, "firearm" means any device, designed to
be used as a weapon, from which is expelled through a barrel, a
projectile by the force of any explosion or other form of combustion.

chiselchst
04-23-2010, 11:13 PM
How long is the statue of limitations for this?

Doheny
04-23-2010, 11:16 PM
OK, I'm confused, cuz up until recently I too have only been a handgun guy and my situation is like OPs (received long guns from my Dad.)

So, if I want to sell his (now mine) rifles, can I just do so FTF cash, or does it need to be PPT?

Where/when does the age of the gun come into play? What's C&R? He's got a couple of real old rifles.

Anything else I need to know?

Mssr. Eleganté
04-23-2010, 11:26 PM
How long is the statue of limitations for this?

Three years.

Librarian
04-23-2010, 11:37 PM
OK, I'm confused, cuz up until recently I too have only been a handgun guy and my situation is like OPs (received long guns from my Dad.)

So, if I want to sell his (now mine) rifles, can I just do so FTF cash, or does it need to be PPT?

Where/when does the age of the gun come into play? What's C&R? He's got a couple of real old rifles.

Anything else I need to know?

PPT -- unless the long guns are 50 years old or older.

Doheny
04-23-2010, 11:39 PM
/\. got it, thanks.

Mssr. Eleganté
04-23-2010, 11:39 PM
OK, I'm confused, cuz up until recently I too have only been a handgun guy and my situation is like OPs (received long guns from my Dad.)

So, if I want to sell his (now mine) rifles, can I just do so FTF cash, or does it need to be PPT?

Where/when does the age of the gun come into play? What's C&R? He's got a couple of real old rifles.

Anything else I need to know?

Most firearms transfers between California residents have to go through a California licensed dealer. How you originally got the gun doesn't matter. If you want to sell a gun to another Californian now, you have to do the transfer through a California licensed dealer. There is an exception for "Family" transfers, between a grandparent, parent, child, or grandchild. There is also an exception for C&R long guns that are at least 50 years old.

"C&R" means "curios & relics", a class of firearms created by the Feds in 1968 by the Gun Control Act. These are firearms which have special value to collectors because they possess some qualities not ordinarily associated with firearms intended for sporting use or as offensive or defensive weapons. To be recognized as curios or relics, firearms must fall within one of the following categories:

- Have been manufactured at least 50 years prior to the current date, but not including replicas thereof; or

- Be certified by the curator of a municipal, State, or Federal museum which exhibits firearms to be curios or relics of museum interest; or

- Derive a substantial part of their monetary value from the fact that they are novel, rare, bizarre, or from the fact of their association with some historical figure, period, or event.

So any firearm that is classified as "C&R" by the Feds, and is a long gun and is at least 50 years old, is exempt from California's dealer transfer requirements.


If you want to transfer a firearm to somebody from another State then Federal law requires that the transfer go through an FFL.

Doheny
04-23-2010, 11:46 PM
Thanks.