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WOOLEY BOOGER
04-07-2010, 1:24 PM
is the bloodhound a good breed for pig hunting and if so how do you train?

lewdogg21
04-07-2010, 8:07 PM
bigboarstopper is probably the most knowledgeable about pigs and dogs on this forum. Shoot him a pm.

bigboarstopper
04-07-2010, 10:48 PM
I have never heard of anyone using a bloodhound to hunt hogs. As a matter of fact I havent heard of anyone using bloodhounds to hunt much of anything.
The bloodhound has been bred mostly for show over the years. While it still has a fantastic nose it dosent have the ability to "move" a track. Meaning once the dog smells the track it cant trail it fast enough to ever get to the desired game animal. Bloodhounds simply dont have the athletic ability or stamina to cover the ground quickly enough to get the job done. Nor do they have the ability to keep a hog at bay.
The adverage hog dog is a "silent trailer" (dog that only barks once the game being persued has been found) as opposed to an "open trailer" (a dog that barks once the scent of the desired game has been found.) These dogs are usually run in packs of 3 or more. They are typically "hot nosed" (dog that finds game usually within 1000yds of his owner). These dogs will bay the hog until the owner/hunter can get within shooting distance. These dogs will have a variety of protective vests or collars on them depending on the dogs agressiveness. The breeds can vary. The usual breeds are the Catahoula, Black mouth cur, Plott hound, Airedale terrier, Ratt terrier, Fiest, Patterdale terrier, Argentine dogo numerous cattle herding breeds and many others. Often a mixed breed of many of the above listed have been bred to get the traits of one to compliment the other for their specific styles. Some crosses or purebreds can be quite agressive or more passive. Some can deliver a wider hunting range. The thought is getting a balance between desired range and agressiveness to stop a running hog.
I currently run a cross of catahoula with Kemmer cur. My other crosses are a combination of Plott hound, catahoula and Austrailian shepard.

luisdeleon
04-08-2010, 8:23 AM
I have never heard of anyone using a bloodhound to hunt hogs. As a matter of fact I havent heard of anyone using bloodhounds to hunt much of anything.
The bloodhound has been bred mostly for show over the years. While it still has a fantastic nose it dosent have the ability to "move" a track. Meaning once the dog smells the track it cant trail it fast enough to ever get to the desired game animal. Bloodhounds simply dont have the athletic ability or stamina to cover the ground quickly enough to get the job done. Nor do they have the ability to keep a hog at bay.
The adverage hog dog is a "silent trailer" (dog that only barks once the game being persued has been found) as opposed to an "open trailer" (a dog that barks once the scent of the desired game has been found.) These dogs are usually run in packs of 3 or more. They are typically "hot nosed" (dog that finds game usually within 1000yds of his owner). These dogs will bay the hog until the owner/hunter can get within shooting distance. These dogs will have a variety of protective vests or collars on them depending on the dogs agressiveness. The breeds can vary. The usual breeds are the Catahoula, Black mouth cur, Plott hound, Airedale terrier, Ratt terrier, Fiest, Patterdale terrier, Argentine dogo numerous cattle herding breeds and many others. Often a mixed breed of many of the above listed have been bred to get the traits of one to compliment the other for their specific styles. Some crosses or purebreds can be quite agressive or more passive. Some can deliver a wider hunting range. The thought is getting a balance between desired range and agressiveness to stop a running hog.
I currently run a cross of catahoula with Kemmer cur. My other crosses are a combination of Plott hound, catahoula and Austrailian shepard.

In central america my uncle's use blood hounds for hunting deer, it the perfered chioce. and are very expensive dogs to have so the ones with money usually have them.

Bearclaw
04-08-2010, 12:02 PM
If you want a hound for pig hunting, here are my recommendations:
1. FORGET about a Bloodhound

2. Get either Black and Tan or Bluetick - I used to have a B&T and he was great...the hardest part was keeping up with him.

3. Plott Hounds were specifically bred for pig hunting

4. Many people use some breed of Cur and/or Pitbull - Once trained to use their nose, these are tough, hearty dogs

5. Remember recommendation #1. :43:

WOOLEY BOOGER
04-08-2010, 8:27 PM
allright thanks everyone, i guess the purpose of a blood hound was to sniff a blood trail, still a wonderful dog though, will have to find something different.
and a question for bigboarstopper, where do you find your info? I would love to know more about my dog, Copper.

bigboarstopper
04-08-2010, 8:47 PM
Besides hunting with hounds almost exclusively, Ive read a pile of hound realted books over the years. I subscribe to Bayed solid magazine, Full cry magazine and im a member of the California Houndsman for Conservation. Ive gotten a lots of valuable information and exposure over the years with those sources.

Bearclaw
04-09-2010, 1:06 PM
Besides hunting with hounds almost exclusively, Ive read a pile of hound realted books over the years. I subscribe to Bayed solid magazine, Full cry magazine and im a member of the California Houndsman for Conservation. Ive gotten a lots of valuable information and exposure over the years with those sources.

I used to get Full Cry when I had my B&T....great mag.

bigboarstopper
04-09-2010, 4:48 PM
Full Cry has really fallen off in the last few years. I flip through it and im done. This will be my last year for that magazine. Its turned into a breed registry magazine. Its also getting smaller and smaller. Ive kept all the old issues from years past. Id much rather re-read the old issues than read the newer ones.

Bearclaw
04-10-2010, 8:51 AM
Wow...and I thought it used to be so good. That stinks. Well at least I know not to get it, when I get back into hound hunting.

bigboarstopper
04-13-2010, 11:29 PM
In central america my uncle's use blood hounds for hunting deer, it the perfered chioce. and are very expensive dogs to have so the ones with money usually have them.

That dosent surprise me at all. However the style in which these dogs are hunting deer is to flush. Not to bring to bay or tree. Its apples and oranges. And definitely wouldnt be a desired trait in a hog dog.

Hazard
04-19-2010, 2:40 PM
I was a regular wild boar hunter using dogs and a Rigid Bear Knife, for many years in my younger days. The best dogs I ever had were two bull terrier dalmation cross dogs. They were fast, big, muscular, and very intelligent and easily trained. They were very brave dogs, they had no fear at all no matter how big the boar they caught, and they never ever let go whilst lugging even when on occasion they were seriously ripped by a tusker untill I called out, "AWAY," and I trusted them compleatly with my children. As you can see the ferel pigs grow to quite a large size downunder. This one was caught killing a cow and had begun feeding on the carcus.
Haz.

Hazard
04-19-2010, 2:48 PM
Ill try and find to upload a pic of my best and favourite dog.

Haz.

bearstatearmory.com
04-19-2010, 9:39 PM
What about hunting with any of the Mastiff breeds? If I'm not mistaken, they were breed for hunting large game in the old days. I have a Cane Corso (Italian Mastiff) and that's what they were breed for.

bigboarstopper
04-19-2010, 10:58 PM
Ive seen a few people try mastiffs of one kind or another. The issue with them is they lack sufficend stamina to cover the distances needed. They have massive stopping power but they always gas out before the other dogs. Catch dogs need to have speed. Remember a catch dog needs to run with a complete protective vest. The bigger dogs tend to over heat too fast too soon.

Ive also seen people try some of the larger american bulldogs, The ones that push 100lbs or more. The result is the same. If they could ever cover the ground without gassing they could stop some big hogs. Another thing is the larger the dog the louder the dog will pant. Those big dogs breathe so heavy that at times its difficult to hear the strike dogs strike when walking one on a lead. The person who is holding the dog usually needs to be 50' behind us or more so we can hear where the race is going.

I prefer a smaller catch dog. Ones that are easy on the leash and are fast. You dont need a boat anchor of a catchdog. Just something that can close a 300yd gap quickly and will hold for 5 minutes or less. If the hog breaks off then the catch will recover and catch again with the help of the strike dogs. Those massive dogs tend to hold on longer than one would want. They sustain heavy injuries often and tend to have short careers.

bearstatearmory.com
04-20-2010, 3:45 PM
Ive seen a few people try mastiffs of one kind or another. The issue with them is they lack sufficend stamina to cover the distances needed. They have massive stopping power but they always gas out before the other dogs. Catch dogs need to have speed. Remember a catch dog needs to run with a complete protective vest. The bigger dogs tend to over heat too fast too soon.

Ive also seen people try some of the larger american bulldogs, The ones that push 100lbs or more. The result is the same. If they could ever cover the ground without gassing they could stop some big hogs. Another thing is the larger the dog the louder the dog will pant. Those big dogs breathe so heavy that at times its difficult to hear the strike dogs strike when walking one on a lead. The person who is holding the dog usually needs to be 50' behind us or more so we can hear where the race is going.

I prefer a smaller catch dog. Ones that are easy on the leash and are fast. You dont need a boat anchor of a catchdog. Just something that can close a 300yd gap quickly and will hold for 5 minutes or less. If the hog breaks off then the catch will recover and catch again with the help of the strike dogs. Those massive dogs tend to hold on longer than one would want. They sustain heavy injuries often and tend to have short careers.

Very interesting, thanks for the reply.