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View Full Version : Thoughts on building a Garand.


CHS
04-02-2010, 5:23 PM
So, I've been giving some thought to building a Garand from parts. I'll want to blast and refinish everything to make it a nice "new" looking Garand and use a brand-new barrel as well. Since the barrel will come short-chambered and need to be finish-reamed, I obviously can't use a chrome-lined one.

But, where to start? Should I just search Gunbroker for a used receiver and start looking for parts, or are there better places to get what I'm looking for?

What about receivers? Is there anything I should definitely avoid? Is anyone making new receivers, or is it best to start with a used one?

Are there any sites where "parts kits" are available so that I'm not hunting down quite so many individual parts?

And while I'm at it, what could stand to be upgraded? I'm not looking at building a totally 100% period-correct Garand. I just want a Garand and a fun project :)

vf111
04-02-2010, 5:28 PM
My recommendation? Buy a service grade from the CMP and bead blast / re-park, install new wood and it'll be good as new and you won't have to mess with re-barreling it. If you have your heart set on re-barreling, buy a field grade for $495 and you'll basically have a complete rifle sans a new barrel. You will not be able to pick up a parts kit + receiver for less than that. Fair waring: you will be able to stop at one.....

kurac
04-02-2010, 5:59 PM
Buy one, I went the build route and it cost a lot more than buying a correct grade from the CMP

If you want to have fun and blow some extra money, go for it.

Milsurp Collector
04-02-2010, 6:40 PM
Buy one, I went the build route and it cost a lot more than buying a correct grade from the CMP



+1. Unless you have already accumulated a bunch of parts, more expensive to build from scratch.

Buy a Field Grade from the CMP and then upgrade with new barrel, stock, refinish, springs, adjustable gas plug, etc.

CSDGuy
04-02-2010, 7:51 PM
I'd say to buy a CMP Field grade and upgrade it as needed/desired. As to receivers... if the serial number is less than about 6.1 million... that's what you want. Any receiver with a higher SN than that will not be considered a C&R rifle and would have to go through the normal DROS.

If you truly want to build one from the receiver on up, occasionally the CMP sells barrelled receivers.

Field Grade + decent barrel + new springs = good potential for a good shootin' rifle. Total cost... probably in the $7-800 range.

I have a service grade... It shoots pretty good. It + inexperienced nut behind the trigger (rifle noob) + Black Hills Gold ammo for it can put mucho holes in the 10 ring of an NRA Military type target at 100 yards, with iron sights...

coop44
04-02-2010, 8:18 PM
try and find a beater, it will give you a good place to start. The parts will be there. Replace a few worn parts, maybe get a new citadel barrel from cmp. send it out to repark. clean up the wood. you will still be in it more than a rack grade, but, the experience is priceless.

CHS
04-02-2010, 11:08 PM
I'd say to buy a CMP Field grade and upgrade it as needed/desired. As to receivers... if the serial number is less than about 6.1 million... that's what you want. Any receiver with a higher SN than that will not be considered a C&R rifle and would have to go through the normal DROS.


Actually, NO Garand receiver is considered a C&R because it's not in original configuration.

But I appreciate all your thoughts.

Looks like I might just go the rack/field grade route and upgrade :(

Seems like it will take most of the fun out of it though :)

NiteQwill
04-02-2010, 11:30 PM
Actually, NO Garand receiver is considered a C&R because it's not in original configuration.


:confused:

Off the top of my head, all (non-commercial) USGI M1 Garands (and carbines, such as ones sold my CMP) are C&R eligible if made prior to 1957...

CSDGuy
04-03-2010, 2:42 AM
bdsmchs: if that's the case, then why is it that the CMP can send you a barreled receiver or even a rifle "less wood"... that's also not in it's "original configuration"... right to your door? They might be "Congressionally Chartered" or whatever, but even for them, "modern" rifles have to go through an FFL.

Milsurp Collector
04-03-2010, 7:58 AM
Looks like I might just go the rack/field grade route and upgrade :(

Seems like it will take most of the fun out of it though :)

Think of it as a much cheaper way of getting a complete parts kit. After you take it apart down to the barreled receiver it is the same as a parts kit.

EOD Guy
04-03-2010, 8:32 AM
bdsmchs: if that's the case, then why is it that the CMP can send you a barreled receiver or even a rifle "less wood"... that's also not in it's "original configuration"... right to your door? They might be "Congressionally Chartered" or whatever, but even for them, "modern" rifles have to go through an FFL.

When Congress established the CMP they also exempted them from the Gun Control Act of 1968. That's why they don't have to ship to an FFL and can ship directly to your door. They can do that for any .22 or .30 caliber rifles they receive from the Army.

EOD Guy
04-03-2010, 8:36 AM
:confused:

Off the top of my head, all (non-commercial) USGI M1 Garands (and carbines, such as ones sold my CMP) are C&R eligible if made prior to 1957...

All USGI M1 rifles are C&R regardless of date of manufacture. The C&R list was changed several years ago. The point is moot though since they are all over 50 years old now.

campperrykid
04-03-2010, 9:56 AM
Matches my experience as well:
+1. Unless you have already accumulated a bunch of parts, more expensive to build from scratch.

Buy a Field Grade from the CMP and then upgrade with new barrel, stock, refinish, springs, adjustable gas plug, etc.

At least for right now -- the Golden Age ( circa 2001-2002) of buying a Garand parts kit from , say , Sarco , and a re-parked CMP reciever for a total of around $450 or so are over.
We are talking NOS barrels and stocks , all refinished metal , NOS re-furb'ed op rods -- and easy to assemble.

smle-man
04-03-2010, 12:16 PM
I had all of the major parts for an M1 laying about so I bought a reciever from the CMP along with a stock set. Dean's Gun Restorations barreled it up and reparked it. Even with having the barrel, bolt, op rod, gas cylinder, and trigger group parts I still ended up with about an additional 350 into it. The whole thing probably cost in the range of 550. It was fun and turned out nice but it wasn't a cost savings by any means.

I got the parts from Century when they abandoned their M1 rifle project. They were in nice condition and cheap!

http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff237/smle-man/GradeBm1001.jpg