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View Full Version : can I just have this gun mailed to me with no dros / C&R?


weezil_boi
03-28-2010, 2:49 PM
My Dad wants to give me the family rifle. Its a 1873 Springfield. I am sure it is over 100 years old. It belonged to my G-Grt Grandfather and was his issued rifle before they recalled them for some safety reasons. He ended up buying it before being sent off to dakota from texas.

My question is, if I am sure it is over 100 years old, can I simply have it catred up and mailed to me? Or would I still need a C&R license to mail it into CA? I see all kind of stuff that can be sold and mailed with no FFL, but they all seem to be old mausers and such. does that matter?

I know that I can just go down to texas and get it, but thats tough for me. Can he just ship it to me?

Thanks in advance.

Peter in CA
03-28-2010, 3:32 PM
weezil_boi,
An antique gun is made before 1899, not just over 100 years old. December 31, 1898, or earlier, was set as the date for "antique" weapons in the Federal code and that date has never been changed. Your families 1873 Springfield should have been made before 1899, and it probably has a manufacture date on it.

If it was made before 1899, you may legally have it shipped directly to you from Texas. California has not messed with this provision of the Federal code. Yet. So get a move on. Have it packed well. these can be worth some coin.

Peter in CA

littlejake
03-28-2010, 7:04 PM
weezil_boi,
An antique gun is made before 1899, not just over 100 years old. December 31, 1898, or earlier, was set as the date for "antique" weapons in the Federal code and that date has never been changed. Your families 1873 Springfield should have been made before 1899, and it probably has a manufacture date on it.

If it was made before 1899, you may legally have it shipped directly to you from Texas. California has not messed with this provision of the Federal code. Yet. So get a move on. Have it packed well. these can be worth some coin.

Peter in CA

To amplify on what Peter said. pre 1899 is an antique and requires no FFL for interstate transfer. In essence it is not considered a firearm.

However, CA does not exempt pre 1899 handguns from the loaded and or concealed statutes. Some folks have been snagged by that little "trap."

For your long gun -- as long as it was made before 1899 it can be transferred interstate without an FFL -- that exemption was put into the GCA of 1968.

pogo
03-28-2010, 8:20 PM
My Dad wants to give me the family rifle. Its a 1873 Springfield. I am sure it is over 100 years old. It belonged to my G-Grt Grandfather and was his issued rifle before they recalled them for some safety reasons. He ended up buying it before being sent off to dakota from texas. .... ..... ..... .....
.
That is quite a family treasure, you are one lucky person, is this a carbine then?

There was a trapdoor recall in 1879 to beef up the breechblock(?), being in original condition makes it all the more valuable.

Looking forward to pics, more details, general serial number, etc when you get a chance!

weezil_boi
03-28-2010, 8:29 PM
weezil_boi,
An antique gun is made before 1899, not just over 100 years old. December 31, 1898, or earlier, was set as the date for "antique" weapons in the Federal code...

Thanks for the clarification.

This is great news.

IrishPirate
03-28-2010, 8:33 PM
ditto on what everyone else said. and to clarify...if it's not antique you'd have to have it shipped to an FFL, and IIRC, no you wouldn't have to DROS since it's intrafamily transfer. Guns and Mail can always get confusing....best to either pick it up, or find a friendly FFL, but in your case you should be A-O-K!!!

weezil_boi
03-28-2010, 8:34 PM
That is quite a family treasure, you are one lucky person, is this a carbine then?

There was a trapdoor recall in 1879 to beef up the breechblock(?), being in original condition makes it all the more valuable.

Looking forward to pics, more details, general serial number, etc when you get a chance!

I dont think so. He said it would be a pain to ship since it is so long. I guess neither my grandfather or father have ever fired it because they thought it was unsafe. From what they know, the rifles were recalled or decomissioned to to that. I will likely never shot it either, just try to keep it from rusting away ;)

scrat
03-28-2010, 9:31 PM
Wow what a treasure

pogo
03-28-2010, 10:48 PM
I dont think so. He said it would be a pain to ship since it is so long. I guess neither my grandfather or father have ever fired it because they thought it was unsafe. From what they know, the rifles were recalled or decomissioned to to that. I will likely never shot it either, just try to keep it from rusting away ;)
The full length Trapdoor should be just under 52" long, was he considering shipping in a hard case?

Academy Sports stores are pretty common in Texas and they sell a few different style 53" OAL hard cases for around $50, the rifle may "just" fit in one for (preferably overnight) shipping. The case can be put in a cardboard box so it doesn't look like a rifle is inside (Academy may also have the cardboard box that the case came in).

endwahl
03-30-2010, 11:07 AM
Plano makes cases up to 53" long, they're squared off as well so when wrapped they don't scream "gun".

As above, given that the US adopted Krag bolt guns in the 1890's, all trapdoors are antiques.

Note that antique handguns can also be shipped/transferred the same way with no restrictions. The only restrictions are on loaded and concealed carry/transport as with curio or modern pistols. An aggressive prosecutor might add the unregistered enhancement as well but I suspect a judge would shut that down. So when self-transporting your antiques in your car treat them as you would modern guns.