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Seesm
03-20-2010, 10:12 PM
My lady is going to Germany... Has a family heirloom (pistol) can she carry it home (WWII relic) in her "checked" baggage with no issues? If not what would be the best least hassle way of doing this...? Thanks folks.

BigDogatPlay
03-20-2010, 10:18 PM
Without an importation permit from BATFE, customs would likely seize it when she goes through.

Seesm
03-21-2010, 1:50 AM
Ahhhh that sucks.... Could she ship it as parts in parts....? Not trying to do anything illegal just curious what could be done if anything... Thanks

andalusi
03-21-2010, 2:18 AM
My lady is going to Germany... Has a family heirloom (pistol) can she carry it home (WWII relic) in her "checked" baggage with no issues? If not what would be the best least hassle way of doing this...? Thanks folks.

My guess is that she'll need to fill out one of these (http://www.atf.gov/forms/download/atf-f-5330-3a.pdf) and that she'll have to do so very carefully (http://www.atf.gov/press/releases/2009/09/090309-atf-common-form-6-errors.html).

But you shouldn't depend on us. She should contact someone at the ATF (there's a phone number in the second link) and ask how she can legally bring it into the country. She may want to ask the CA DOJ what she needs to do, too, given the heirloom in question is a handgun.

JDay
03-21-2010, 7:24 AM
My guess is that she'll need to fill out one of these (http://www.atf.gov/forms/download/atf-f-5330-3a.pdf) and that she'll have to do so very carefully (http://www.atf.gov/press/releases/2009/09/090309-atf-common-form-6-errors.html).

But you shouldn't depend on us. She should contact someone at the ATF (there's a phone number in the second link) and ask how she can legally bring it into the country. She may want to ask the CA DOJ what she needs to do, too, given the heirloom in question is a handgun.

She would be EXPORTING not IMPORTING. In any case she cant do it, Germany has some strict laws when it comes to handguns. Not to mention the cost of exporting it to Germany and importing it back to the states. She would also need a German firearms permit, firearm insurance and a weapons locker.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics_in_Germany#Current_laws

After 1945, the Allied Forces commanded the complete disarming of Germany. Even German police officers were initially not allowed to carry firearms. Private ownership of firearms was not allowed until after 1956[8]. The legal status returned essentially to that of the Law on Firearms and Ammunition of 1928. The regulation of the matter was thoroughly revised in 1972, when the new Federal Weapons Act (Bundeswaffengesetz) became effective.

In Germany the possession of any firearm with a fire energy exceeding 7.5 Joule requires a valid firearms ownership license for any particular weapon. The current Federal Weapons Act adopts a two-tiered approach to firearms licensing.

A firearms ownership license (Waffenbesitzkarte) must be obtained before a weapon can be purchased. Owners of multiple firearms need separate ownership licenses for every single firearm they own. It entitles owners to purchase firearms and handle them on their own property and any private property with property owner consent. On public premises, a licensed firearm must be transported unloaded and in a stable, fully enclosing, locked container. A weapons ownership license does not entitle the owner to shoot the weapon or carry it on public premises without the prescribed container. Firearms ownership licenses are valid three years or less, and owners must obtain mandatory insurance and a means to securely store the weapon on their premises (a weapons locker). Blanket ownership licenses are sometimes issued to arms dealers.

A number of criteria must be met before a firearms ownership license is issued:

* age of consent (18 years for rimfire calibers/21 years for higher calibers) ( 4 WaffG)
* trustworthiness ( 5 WaffG)
* personal adequacy ( 6 WaffG)
* expert knowledge ( 7 WaffG) and
* necessity ( 8 WaffG) (Necessity is automatically assumed present for licensed hunters and owners of a carry permits (Waffenschein)).

Persons who are

* convicted felons
* have a record of mental disorder or
* are deemed unreliable (which includes people with drug or alcohol addiction histories and known violent or aggressive persons) are barred from obtaining a firearms ownership license.

Firearms carry permits entitle licensees to publicly carry legally owned weapons, loaded in a concealed or non-concealed manner. A mandatory legal and safety class and shooting proficiency tests are required to obtain such a permit. Carry permits are usually only issued to persons with a particular need for carrying a firearm. This includes licensed hunters, law-enforcement officers, security personnel and persons living under a raised threat-level like celebrities and politicians.

The weapons law does not apply to military use of weapons within the Bundeswehr.

The identity card of German troops contains a term allowing them carrying weapons. Nevertheless, issuance of guns and especially ammunition is also very strictly controlled within the armed forces.

andalusi
03-21-2010, 1:05 PM
She would be EXPORTING not IMPORTING. In any case she cant do it, Germany has some strict laws when it comes to handguns. Not to mention the cost of exporting it to Germany and importing it back to the states. She would also need a German firearms permit, firearm insurance and a weapons locker.

The original post could be read either way, I think, but honestly, it didn't occur to me that someone would be trying to take the heirloom pistol to Germany. No offense to the OP's wife if that's what she intends, but even without Jday's helpful link, I could have told you that's an idea of questionable wisdom (to put it mildly).

JDay
03-21-2010, 9:51 PM
The original post could be read either way, I think, but honestly, it didn't occur to me that someone would be trying to take the heirloom pistol to Germany. No offense to the OP's wife if that's what she intends, but even without Jday's helpful link, I could have told you that's an idea of questionable wisdom (to put it mildly).

I may have read that wrong, but if she's trying to get it back to the state it's going to cost a ton of money and take a bunch of red tape.

Seesm
03-22-2010, 12:45 AM
Yeah from Germany to United States... Seems like a hassle for sure. Thanks

motorhead
03-22-2010, 1:33 AM
the frame is considered a firearm.

JDay
03-22-2010, 6:14 AM
the frame is considered a firearm.

When shipping from overseas every part is considered a firearm. It all has to go through an importer and there is a ton of paperwork.

NSR500
03-22-2010, 6:21 AM
Contact an FFL08 that my be familiar with German imports.