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Nihonto Chicken
03-11-2010, 6:34 PM
Here are some pics of a complete box of fifty rounds of .45 ACP ball ammo:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/nihontochicken/45ACP1.jpg

I have the following questions:

1. Is this indeed 1943 manufacture?

2. What is the case constructed of, nickel, nickel-plated brass, or ???

3. Is this ammo corrosive?

4. Is there any collector interest in this, or should I just go ahead and shoot it? (Note: the box and ammo are in very good condition.)

Thanks in advance! :)

Kerplow
03-11-2010, 6:40 PM
i would have thought the packaging in nice condition is worth more than the ammo. really though, i have no idea as i'm in to cheap ammo, not collectible ammo.;)

nrakid88
03-11-2010, 6:41 PM
Please don't shoot it. I am prettu sure its worth a bit, even if a little, and just think about how cool this would be to hang on to. If your going to shoot it I will trade you factory ammo and you can just shoot that.

a1c
03-11-2010, 6:58 PM
I believe this should actually be steel-cased ammo. And yes, it's somewhat corrosive.

And as nrakid said, don't shoot it. First of all because it's old, and because this is collectable stuff. I'm actually interested in this. PM sent.

Mssr. Eleganté
03-11-2010, 7:03 PM
1. Is this indeed 1943 manufacture?

Yes, manufactured in 1943 at the Evansville Chrysler Sunbeam plant.

2. What is the case constructed of, nickel, nickel-plated brass, or ???

The case is constructed of steel.

3. Is this ammo corrosive?

Yes, boxer primed and corrosive.

4. Is there any collector interest in this, or should I just go ahead and shoot it? (Note: the box and ammo are in very good condition.)

Not very much collector intererest at this time. Tons of it came up for sale in spam cans a few years ago when it was reimported from another country. At that time it was selling for a little bit less than new production ammo.

nickarino
03-11-2010, 11:27 PM
I always wondered why there is never any milsurp .45 ammo available. With all the submachine guns from WWII and Korea, as well as the fact that the 1911 hung on so long in service, I would think there are huge government stockpiles of .45 collecting dust somewhere.

a1c
03-12-2010, 7:05 AM
I always wondered why there is never any milsurp .45 ammo available. With all the submachine guns from WWII and Korea, as well as the fact that the 1911 hung on so long in service, I would think there are huge government stockpiles of .45 collecting dust somewhere.

That's a good question. Perhaps the US government has a different policy than other countries dealing with ammunition, and ammo that's too old gets destroyed? Just a random, uneducated guess. Or maybe it just gets all shot...

Harbinger
03-12-2010, 7:12 AM
I came into three boxes of military .38 Special from 1951 and just shot it up.

Kept all three boxes for display, of course!

When I reloaded the cases, it was the first time I had to remove primer pocket crimp on a .38!

Mike

Bhobbs
03-12-2010, 8:31 AM
I thought the US military stopped using corrosive primers before WW2.

Mssr. Eleganté
03-12-2010, 10:24 AM
I thought the US military stopped using corrosive primers before WW2.

The US military phased out corrosive primers between 1951 and 1955. This excludes .30 Carbine ammo, which was always non-corrosive.

Bhobbs
03-12-2010, 12:48 PM
So WW2 M2 ball would be corrosive?

courteousgavin
03-12-2010, 1:48 PM
So WW2 M2 ball would be corrosive?

Definitely corrosive. You can see a list of when all the USGI ammo manufacturers switched to non-corrosive primers at this link. http://web.archive.org/web/20080731134655/http://www.jouster.com/Bulletin/primers.htm

smle-man
03-12-2010, 4:37 PM
This may help:

An extract from a memorandum written by M.E. Podany, ALGC

The following information is provided as a means of identifying non-corrosive
ammunition with the lot and date of first manufacture. As an example, Lake City Arsenal
went to non-corrosive .30-06 ball with its Lot 13700 produced in June 1951. Lots produced
earlier than June 1951 should be considered corrosive, while Lot 13700 and all later lots are
non-corrosive.
Manufacturer Headstamp Ammo Type Starting Lot No. Date
Frankford
Arsenal
FA and last 2
digits of year
Single 4 = 1944
Single 5 = 1955
.30-06 ball
.30-06 AP
.45 M1911 ball
4149
887
1542
June 1951
October 1951
July 1954
Exception #1 .30-06 ball with zinc plated primers and headstamped “FA 47” or later is noncorrosive.
Exception #2 FA 30-06 special Match, headstamped “FA53”, “FA 54” or “FA 56” that has red,
purple or green primer sealant is corrosive.
Federal
Cartridge Co.
FCC and last 2
digits of year
.45 M1911 ball 1801 November 1953
Lake City
Arsenal
LC and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball
.30-06 AP
13700
13158
June 1951
April 1952
Remington
Arms Co., Inc.
RA and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball
.45 M1911 ball
33853
5552
November 1951
September 1952
St. Louis
Ordnance Plant
SL and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball
.30-06 AP
9420
9467
May 1952
July 1952
28 October 2002 2
Manufacturer Headstamp Ammo Type Starting Lot No. Date
Twin Cities
Arsenal
TW and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball
.30-06 AP
.45 M1911 ball
19362
19776
18000
December 1950
February 1952
August 1953
Western
Cartridge Co.
WCC and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball
.45 M1911 ball
6428
6375
June 1951
November 1952
Winchester
Repeating Arms
Co.
WRA and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball
.30-06 AP
.45 M1911 ball
steel case
23201
22007
22198
22000-22007 only
August 1951
June 1954
November 1951
June 1954
Dominion
Arsenal, Canada
DAQ and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball 44000
all by this maker
was noncorrosive
August 1945
Verdun Arsenal,
Canada
VC and last 2
digits of year
.30-06 ball 42000
all by this maker
was noncorrosive
April 1945
Other Ammunition
All .30 carbine ammunition is non-corrosive.
All 7.62mm NATO ammunition manufactured in the U.S. is non-corrosive except 1956
International Match ammunition manufactured at the Frankford Arsenal at the same time as
the .30-06 International Match ammo listed previously. In 1930 Frankford Arsenal produced a
batch of National Match ammunition that was non-corrosive. Problems with high pressures
occurred at Camp Perry and the lot was replaced with a conventionally loaded lot and not
used further.
The following manufacturers made small arms ammunition during World War II only
and all of their production was corrosive:
Manufacturer Headstamp
Eau Claire Ordnance Plant EW and last 2 digits of year
Denver Ordnance Plant DEN and last 2 digits of year
Des Moines Ordnance Plant DM and last 2 digits of year
Utah Ordnance Plant U or UT and last 2 digits of year
It should be noted that sometimes ammunition is repacked and the date of repacking is noted
on the containers. This date is not the date of manufacture, if there is question about the
manufacture date always check the headstamp!
References

youpock
03-12-2010, 4:53 PM
I always wondered why there is never any milsurp .45 ammo available. With all the submachine guns from WWII and Korea, as well as the fact that the 1911 hung on so long in service, I would think there are huge government stockpiles of .45 collecting dust somewhere.

They blow it up, my dad used to own a trucking business with his uncle and cousin and they had a contract back in the 80's to haul containers from camp p. out into Nevada. He used to get all sorts of ammo for free and it was all old stuff from Vietnam.

Nihonto Chicken
03-13-2010, 7:47 AM
Thank you for the responses. I guess I'll just leave the box sitting on the shelf for now, maybe wait for "The Pacific" to boost the collector premium. :p

acfarer
04-10-2010, 10:10 AM
Yes it is from the Evansville plant but the cases were made at the Sunbeam plant on the other side of town and trucked to the ammo plant for loading. Steel case. Corrosive. Read bellow.

EC Evansville Ordnance Plant, Evansville, Indiana

(The Chrysler operated Evansville Ordnance Plant consisted of 2 factories on opposite sides of Evansville. The main Plant coded its ammunition as indicated, but the other factory, the former Sunbeam Electric plant, made only .45 auto cases, first in brass, and then later in steel. Their cases were headstamped EC S and were trucked across town for loading at the EC plant).

EC S Evansville Ordnance Plant - Sunbeam Electric, Evansville,