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dd03
03-04-2010, 5:24 PM
when you have an aperture rear and aperture front sights, do you concentrate on the target or the aperture front sight? (In other words, is the front aperture fuzzy or the target fuzzy?)

Casual Observer
03-04-2010, 5:34 PM
when you have an aperture rear and aperture front sights, do you concentrate on the target or the aperture front sight? (In other words, is the front aperture fuzzy or the target fuzzy?)

It's been a while since I was on the Basic Rifle Marksmanship range at Benning, but I seem to recall it was the front sight post. Both your rear sight and the target should be out of focus (aka- "fuzzy")

I haven't really shot with irons since then. I should probably dust off my common-skills book and review. :cool:

ocabj
03-04-2010, 6:05 PM
It's been a while since I was on the Basic Rifle Marksmanship range at Benning, but I seem to recall it was the front sight post. Both your rear sight and the target should be out of focus (aka- "fuzzy")

I haven't really shot with irons since then. I should probably dust off my common-skills book and review. :cool:

The OP is asking about match sights (front aperture with rear aperture), not service rifle sights (front post with rear aperture).

That said, the funny thing is you actually focus on the target, but it's not really a hard focus. There will be blur on the target black. But your mind will instinctively center the target black in the front aperture. The amount of white in the front aperture and where that white is predominant will be imprinted in your mind when you take the shot and you'll learn to make the call based on that.

dd03
03-04-2010, 6:18 PM
That said, the funny thing is you actually focus on the target, but it's not really a hard focus. There will be blur on the target black. But your mind will instinctively center the target black in the front aperture. The amount of white in the front aperture and where that white is predominant will be imprinted in your mind when you take the shot and you'll learn to make the call based on that.

Sweet. I ask because I'm having problems focusing on the front sight post. The front sight post gets blurry very quickly. I'm hoping to remedy that with aperture front sight.

ocabj
03-04-2010, 6:22 PM
Sweet. I ask because I'm having problems focusing on the front sight post. The front sight post gets blurry very quickly. I'm hoping to remedy that with aperture front sight.

Front aperture may or may not solve your problem. You may need to wear corrective lenses to give you focus on the front sight focal plane or use an adjustable diopter (not adjustable aperture) in the rear aperture to help assist seeing the front sight focal plane.

What rear sight are you using? Warner? RPA? Phoenix? Other?

My tube gun uses a Phoenix rear with a Gehmann 510 rear aperture and a Right Sight front with a 2.9-4.9mm front aperture and .5x magnifier.

http://www.ocabj.net/gallery2/d/10744-2/IMG_2878-crop-1024-pp.jpg

http://www.ocabj.net/gallery2/d/10590-2/IMG_2364-1024-pp.jpg

dd03
03-05-2010, 11:11 PM
I'm using a regular peep rear sight. I already wear glasses. I guess my eyes are too old.

What exactly is an adjustable diopter sight?

ocabj
03-06-2010, 12:54 PM
A diopter sight is basically sight with a lens that has a plus or minus optical power. Think of it as like having a corrective lens inside the aperture. Manufacturers of rear apertures make apertures with diopters, either interchangeable or adjustable. The point of having the diopter is to adjust how well you can focus on the front sight focal plane.

jak77
03-06-2010, 3:22 PM
ocabj, i just looked at your Garand in your sig line. And that rifle is beautiful. The stock is gorgeous! Sorry for the hijack but I had to say it.

dd03
03-06-2010, 3:49 PM
OCABJ,

Thanks for the info. Is there a particular diopter you recommend?