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View Full Version : How long does it take to get DOJ approval?


rideanddive
03-01-2010, 7:31 PM
I tried a Calguns custom search, couldn't find an answer. Does anyone know how long it takes from the time of application submittal to final approval for a handgun?

Ding126
03-01-2010, 7:45 PM
Are you saying..you filed with the DOJ to see if you can own a handgun? Why wouldn't you know...why are you in question?

Mstrty
03-01-2010, 7:51 PM
Are you saying..you files with the DOJ to see if you can own a handgun? Why wouldn't you know...why are you in question?

Are You kidding me. What kind of responce it that to the OP's question?

I dont have an answer to the OP's qustion. But good luck Im sure someone will chime in and give the answer your looking for and not some rude remark.

elrcastor
03-01-2010, 7:51 PM
find and purchase a handgun from your local FFL, with your HSC, and by the time the 10day wait is up you should be approved, unless you have some issue on your record.

Ding126
03-01-2010, 7:57 PM
Are You kidding me. What kind of responce it that to the OP's question?

I dont have an answer to the OP's qustion. But good luck Im sure someone will chime in and give the answer your looking for and not some rude remark.

It was trying to clarify his OP..may I suggest you try decafe

Ding126
03-01-2010, 7:59 PM
find and purchase a handgun from your local FFL, with your HSC, and by the time the 10day wait is up you should be approved, unless you have some issue on your record.

your FFL will notify you if anything comes up ( usually ) I would think the old saying of " No news is good news " applies.

ledman
03-01-2010, 8:08 PM
I tried a Calguns custom search, couldn't find an answer. Does anyone know how long it takes from the time of application submittal to final approval for a handgun?

I have been told by FFL's that they sometimes get a "proceed" with the sale within 24 hours of submitting a DROS...sometimes it can take up to 5 days or more to get a "proceed". BUt you still have to wait the 10 days. The FFL will not call you unless there is a problem with your DROS. As DING said, no news is good news when purchasing a firearm.
It all depends on the workload of the DOJ I guess.

Josh
03-01-2010, 8:23 PM
I have been told by FFL's that they sometimes get a "proceed" with the sale within 24 hours of submitting a DROS...sometimes it can take up to 5 days or more to get a "proceed". BUt you still have to wait the 10 days. The FFL will not call you unless there is a problem with your DROS. As DING said, no news is good news when purchasing a firearm.
It all depends on the workload of the DOJ I guess.

There is no "proceed" signal unless there was an initial hold placed.

The DOJ does not contact the dealer unless there is an issue. And they can place a hold on the DROS at anytime during the 10 day wait, there is no set frame of reference for being out of the woods to be denied.

If you sent in a letter requesting your eligibility status it usually takes a few weeks.

ledman
03-01-2010, 8:25 PM
There is no "proceed" signal unless there was an initial hold placed.

The DOJ does not contact the dealer unless there is an issue. And they can place a hold on the DROS at anytime during the 10 day wait, there is no set frame of reference for being out of the woods to be denied.

If you sent in a letter requesting your eligibility status it usually takes a few weeks.

Thanks for the correction...maybe the FFL I was asking about how it worked, mis-understood what I was asking, but thanks for clearing that up!

dachan
03-01-2010, 9:36 PM
Answer is up to ten 24hr periods. The DOJ doesn't actually issue approvals, rather they issue denials or holds. The DOJ must get a denial or hold to the dealer within ten 24hr periods from the time the DROS is submitted, or else the dealer is free to release the firearm. If it is a hold, it can pretty much be indefinite; but usually the actual buyer can contact the DOJ to try to clear the hold. Otherwise, it'll often drag past the 30day validity period of the DROS, and the hold becomes as good as a denial.

Koolpsych
03-01-2010, 10:05 PM
A local FFL told me that the DOJ once called them and denied a request within 4 hours of the end of the 10 day wait period! So I guess you never know you are safe until you actually have the gun in your hands.

Or I guess you could just not be in in violation of any of the handgun ownership laws.

JagerTroop
03-02-2010, 3:17 AM
I think what the OP is refering to is this: Personal Firearms Eligibility Check (http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/forms/pdf/pfecapp.pdf)

I was told by the DOJ that it takes a few weeks. They don't process the PFEC's with the same urgency as a DROS background check, but you still have to pay the same fees(pretty much).

Keep in mind, if you know that you are a prohibited person, it is a crime to attempt to purchase a firearm. If you a unsure about your legal eligibility to own a firearm, submit the PFEC. If you have no reason to believe that you are prohibited, you could save the 20 bucks, and just buy a firearm. You'll find out much quicker.

edited to add: I just found this:
How long will it take to get the results of my PFEC?

The results will be sent via U.S. Mail. The Department of Justice makes every effort to process requests for PFECs within 30 days of receipt. However, due to budget constraints, please allow 90 - 120 days for the results.


This should answer your questions:PFEC FAQ section (http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/pfecfaqs.php#7)

littlejake
03-02-2010, 9:09 AM
You can DROS a C&R handgun and take it home that day if you have a C&R and a COE. I grant you that a person with both documents is not likely to be in a denied class.

It would seem to me that the check is real-time during the DROS entry -- the 10 days is just a chicken poop way to hassle people in the PRK.:D

kenjimatic
03-02-2010, 3:04 PM
My cousin bought an G21SF with the picatinny rail waited his 10 days picked up the pistol took it out to shoot. About 2 weeks later his FFL called him to bring it back to get it re-DROS'd because it was off roster(my cousin wasn't a LEO), so I would assume it would take some time for DOJ to really "process" the firearm unless you have some record that you can't own a firearm.

rideanddive
03-02-2010, 6:15 PM
How long does it take for the MANUFACTURER to get approval when it submits a gun to make the DOJ list?

Josh
03-02-2010, 8:26 PM
You can DROS a C&R handgun and take it home that day if you have a C&R and a COE. I grant you that a person with both documents is not likely to be in a denied class.

It would seem to me that the check is real-time during the DROS entry -- the 10 days is just a chicken poop way to hassle people in the PRK.:D

the dros is not instant.

the COE is what lets you take the handgun home the same day as it is in essence a background check.

Josh
03-02-2010, 8:27 PM
How long does it take for the MANUFACTURER to get approval when it submits a gun to make the DOJ list?

the answer is, it depends.

The govt moves slow and eventually its going to depend on how fast some paper pusher processes it.

ledman
03-02-2010, 8:28 PM
How long does it take for the MANUFACTURER to get approval when it submits a gun to make the DOJ list?

O! Now you tell us...thanks for clarifying...finally.:eek:

kozumasbullitt
03-03-2010, 1:44 AM
I hope glock gets pushed through.

JagerTroop
03-03-2010, 2:29 AM
I hope glock gets pushed through.

It's not as simple as that. Glock must submit 3 samples of each and every model handgun that they want to be on "the list". Along with a fee for each model. I hear it is quite expensive (not really, for a company like Glock, but you know what I mean)... several thousand for each. n the case of other manufacturers, they must submit for different calibers as well. Glock keeps it simple with a different model for each size/cal.

So, just because a G22 passes, and makes the list, doesn't mean that the G22c is on the list. The 22c must be submitted as an entirely different gun, even though the only difference is the porting.

kozumasbullitt
03-03-2010, 10:06 AM
It's not as simple as that. Glock must submit 3 samples of each and every model handgun that they want to be on "the list". Along with a fee for each model. I hear it is quite expensive (not really, for a company like Glock, but you know what I mean)... several thousand for each. n the case of other manufacturers, they must submit for different calibers as well. Glock keeps it simple with a different model for each size/cal.

So, just because a G22 passes, and makes the list, doesn't mean that the G22c is on the list. The 22c must be submitted as an entirely different gun, even though the only difference is the porting.

yeah but i can bet that the new glocks will find themselves on the list because of the $$$ glock can put up. it is all checks and balances until there is a lot of money to be had in Kalifornia.

JagerTroop
03-03-2010, 1:45 PM
yeah but i can bet that the new glocks will find themselves on the list because of the $$$ glock can put up. it is all checks and balances until there is a lot of money to be had in Kalifornia.

I agree. Glock's slogan/claim to fame, is the "safe action" pistol. So I think there's no question whether they will pass or not... and they CERTAINLY have the money.