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View Full Version : Whelp, stripped my VZ...


Booshanky
03-01-2010, 3:51 PM
Got rid of that godawful bbq paint. That stuff turned to glue the second brake cleaner hit it.

So yeah, stripped it. I'm kinda digging the whole "apocalypse gun" look that this thing has, but I'm also not that into rust. So what should I do? Should I go the full route and duracoat it? If I wanted to leave it in the condition it's in without having to worry about rust, what would you use to seal the metal?

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_4bf9tmqvjjY/S4xgrF0eyUI/AAAAAAABN8Q/idoQUSQWnNs/s800/IMG_3282.JPG

And a slightly closer up view of the T1 PA clone.

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_4bf9tmqvjjY/S4xgreyEm5I/AAAAAAABN8Y/j-p-PLaS51o/s800/IMG_3281.JPG

ar15barrels
03-01-2010, 4:05 PM
Blast and Parkerize.

Booshanky
03-01-2010, 4:07 PM
Blast and Parkerize.

Yeha, but who has a parking bath? I've talked to a few people here who say that they want to do a group job, but it always seems to fall through.

ar15barrels
03-01-2010, 4:09 PM
Drawn will do it.
Just strip it down to all the steel parts and send it to him.

Booshanky
03-01-2010, 4:17 PM
I'll have to investigate that further. Thanks Randall!

harmoniums
03-01-2010, 4:23 PM
I heard the gas blocks wont take a park.
BTW looks like the back of the bolt carrier got hit with a dremel.
What happened there?

Booshanky
03-01-2010, 4:37 PM
Haha, yeah. The wife got me a dremmel and I thought it'd be REALLY COOL to use it to take that paint off the bolt carrier. Haha.

It worked, but left those scuzzy marks on it. When paint hits it, it shouldn't be a problem though.

odysseus
03-01-2010, 4:38 PM
The wood and stripped receiver looks good.

DREADNOUGHT78
03-01-2010, 4:49 PM
Duracoat makes a paint called "Parker" suppose to be close to actual parkerization. I havent tried it yet but all the colors that I have tried I have been happy with.

Booshanky
03-01-2010, 5:06 PM
Duracoat makes a paint called "Parker" suppose to be close to actual parkerization. I havent tried it yet but all the colors that I have tried I have been happy with.

Thanks! I'll certainly give that some consideration.

aplinker
03-01-2010, 6:32 PM
Thanks! I'll certainly give that some consideration.

DuraCoat does its best over park.

If you want it to be bulletproof, that's the route I'd go.

But... with a gun like that, I'd rather just have the plain park.

Most of the finishing work for a park job is in assembly/disassembly and degreasing - PM Drawn and see what he can do for you. He's not far.

ar15barrels
03-01-2010, 6:41 PM
Duracoat makes a paint called "Parker" suppose to be close to actual parkerization. I havent tried it yet but all the colors that I have tried I have been happy with.

It's still a paint though.
Real parkerizing is a surface conversion process that creates a surface that holds oil really well.

bigthaiboy
03-01-2010, 8:13 PM
I heard the gas blocks wont take a park.
BTW looks like the back of the bolt carrier got hit with a dremel.
What happened there?

That is 100% correct. Parkerized my VZ and I think the gas block is stainless steel, as it didn't take the parkerizing at all. Looks kind of cool actually.

DREADNOUGHT78
03-01-2010, 11:42 PM
It's still a paint though.
Real parkerizing is a surface conversion process that creates a surface that holds oil really well.

I know your more knowledgable about these things but the reason for wanting the retention of oil on the metal is for the reduction of corrosion correct? When you use a product like an epoxy based paint like Duracoat as long as it is applied and prepared properly wouldnt the need for oiling be unnecessary? I could understand on parts such as a bolt carrier as with its function if painted it would wear the paint off and Parking would be the answer but on the exterior where the wear of the rifle would be lower don't you think that a coating that eliminates any chance of corrosion be the better choice? I only say this as when I restore a car we sand blast to bare metal and then apply a DP Epoxy primer to stop the corrosion process.

SJgunguy24
03-02-2010, 1:56 AM
Boo, if your gonna do the paint at home you can hit all the metal components with K Phos, Naval Jelly rust remover, Jasco rust remover or most any of the phosphoric acid based rust removers first. Thats the poor mans way to prep the surface for paint. It's basically a cold park that opens up the metal so it will take whatever finish you want to go with. It's not a final finish like boiling in a park tank would give you, but chemically it does that same thing.

Now if you want to preserve the battlefield look you have there, Brownells makes a clear epoxy called Metalcote. It's made to protect bare metal finishes like case hardening and shiney purdy guns. It seems to do a good job with krylon too, I tried it on one of my AR mags that I kryloned.

SJgunguy24
03-02-2010, 2:14 AM
I know your more knowledgable about these things but the reason for wanting the retention of oil on the metal is for the reduction of corrosion correct? When you use a product like an epoxy based paint like Duracoat as long as it is applied and prepared properly wouldnt the need for oiling be unnecessary? I could understand on parts such as a bolt carrier as with its function if painted it would wear the paint off and Parking would be the answer but on the exterior where the wear of the rifle would be lower don't you think that a coating that eliminates any chance of corrosion be the better choice? I only say this as when I restore a car we sand blast to bare metal and then apply a DP Epoxy primer to stop the corrosion process.

While I can't speak for Randall but I will say that prep is the most important thing in a finish. If you have experiance with cars then you know. The park etches the surface or opens it up so it will hold whatever finish you apply.

The park is the primer coat, thats the surface prep. Now when it comes to paint, Duracoat is a polyurethane based paint, not an epoxy.

I use Alumahyde 2 which is an epoxy and I love it. I've beat the hell out of the guns I've painted with AH2 and that stuff just keeps going. The only downside is the cure, it takes a couple weeks to fully cure but so far my results have been great.

ar15barrels
03-02-2010, 7:01 AM
the reason for wanting the retention of oil on the metal is for the reduction of corrosion correct?

And also for it's lubrication properties at moving/sliding points.

ar15barrels
03-02-2010, 7:03 AM
The only downside is the cure, it takes a couple weeks to fully cure but so far my results have been great.

It's recommended to let duracoat cure for a few weeks as well to get full strength.