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View Full Version : Geissele DMR: too light for a carbine?


civilsnake
02-28-2010, 9:03 PM
I have been wanting to start more long range shooting, and I was thinking about picking up a bolt gun, but I'm starting to lean more towards a dedicated upper for my AR with a varmint barrel and decent glass, attempting to shoot from 200-600 yards. If I dig it and am decent at it, I would then potentially step up to something more serious in .243.

It seems that a big part of the battle will be the trigger. I know it's going to be difficult as Hel trying to shoot with high accuracy using my standard AR trigger. I thought I would try out a Geissele since they're highly spoken of around here.

The things is, I want to use one lower for now, and in its normal configuration it's got a 16 inch BCM upper with an Aimpoint, setup for more of a close range, run and gun approach.

So here's the question: would a 2-3lb trigger (as I believe the DMR is) be dangerously light for the carbine's original intended use? In time I plan to get a dedicated lower for a precision platform, but I don't want to outlay that much cash right away.

I think it will be okay, but I'd like opinions from people more experienced in the subject matter. I got to play with the Geissele triggers at SHOT and they were boobies.

armygunsmith
02-28-2010, 9:09 PM
I have a Geiselle SSA and it's really nice, nothing to adjust and good enough for a run and gun. The DMR can be set too light and could be dangerous if used in anything other than a bench rifle.

aplinker
02-28-2010, 9:41 PM
I don't like adjustable triggers in defensive rifles, but the DMR minimum is 3# (2.5 + 0.5).

I forgot to add... I actually run a DMR in my SPR clone.

I see no issue running it even at the minimum. As always, the rules are what keep you safe.

civilsnake
03-01-2010, 7:17 AM
I don't like adjustable triggers in defensive rifles, but the DMR minimum is 3# (2.5 + 0.5).

I forgot to add... I actually run a DMR in my SPR clone.

I see no issue running it even at the minimum. As always, the rules are what keep you safe.

Hmm... I forgot about the adjustable part...

Does anyone make a comparable 2-stage trigger in terms of quality that isn't adjustable?

Hoop
03-01-2010, 7:22 AM
Hmm... I forgot about the adjustable part...

Does anyone make a comparable 2-stage trigger in terms of quality that isn't adjustable?

I have a pair of RRA 2 Stage triggers that I love. They aren't adjustable and break around 4-5lbs I think.

ar15barrels
03-01-2010, 8:25 AM
Hmm... I forgot about the adjustable part...

Does anyone make a comparable 2-stage trigger in terms of quality that isn't adjustable?

No.
It would not be comparable quality if it was not adjustable.
Lower tolerances are really sloppy so you HAVE to tune the trigger to the lower.

The unitized triggers help in this respect though.

civilsnake
03-01-2010, 9:28 AM
What is a unitized trigger?

Full Clip
03-01-2010, 11:01 AM
What is a unitized trigger?

A trigger group module, like from Timney, no?

http://global-tactical.com/images/products/detail/TIMNEYSOLIDTRIGGER.jpg

aplinker
03-01-2010, 11:07 AM
Yes. The trigger housing is what sets the geometry for the trigger, not the trigger pins attached to the lower receiver.

A trigger group module, like from Timney, no?

civilsnake
03-01-2010, 12:11 PM
A trigger group module, like from Timney, no?

http://global-tactical.com/images/products/detail/TIMNEYSOLIDTRIGGER.jpg

Ah, thanks for clearing that up.

Side question: anyone know of an inexpensive force gauge I can use to check pull weights?

ar15barrels
03-01-2010, 1:09 PM
Side question: anyone know of an inexpensive force gauge I can use to check pull weights?

http://www.csc.gov.sg/html/Newsletter/novdec2008/novdecpictures/finger.jpg

civilsnake
03-01-2010, 1:11 PM
http://www.csc.gov.sg/html/Newsletter/novdec2008/novdecpictures/finger.jpg

I disagree: It would take a lot of time and money to find and hire a person with a sensitive enough finger to accurately tell me what the trigger pull weight on my rifle is :P

aplinker
03-01-2010, 1:16 PM
Ah, thanks for clearing that up.

Side question: anyone know of an inexpensive force gauge I can use to check pull weights?

use a pulley system and quarters.

ar15barrels
03-01-2010, 1:31 PM
I disagree: It would take a lot of time and money to find and hire a person with a sensitive enough finger to accurately tell me what the trigger pull weight on my rifle is :P

I can tell just by pulling the trigger.
The actual weight is much less important than the quality of the pull.
Force gauges don't tell you anything about quality. ;)

Teletiger7
03-01-2010, 1:35 PM
I disagree: It would take a lot of time and money to find and hire a person with a sensitive enough finger to accurately tell me what the trigger pull weight on my rifle is :P

Randall,

You should add "trigger pull quality analysis" to your list of services.

civilsnake
03-01-2010, 1:59 PM
I can tell just by pulling the trigger.
The actual weight is much less important than the quality of the pull.
Force gauges don't tell you anything about quality. ;)

Randall,

You should add "trigger pull quality analysis" to your list of services.

Soooo... maybe I take a drive down to Culver City, let Randall pull on my trigger for a bit? Wait, wut?

aplinker
03-01-2010, 2:25 PM
Soooo... maybe I take a drive down to Culver City, let Randall pull on my trigger for a bit? Wait, wut?

He lists that as one of his "shop services" between "pin muzzle device" and "dirty sanchez."

ar15barrels
03-01-2010, 2:37 PM
He lists that as one of his "shop services" between "pin muzzle device" and "dirty sanchez."

dirty sanchez not included...

wilafur
03-01-2010, 4:44 PM
lol

pc_city
03-01-2010, 5:38 PM
I've got Geissele DMRs in both of these. I ain't worried about anything being dangerously light.

http://you-jane.com/images/n4.jpg


http://you-jane.com/images/n6_3.jpg