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CmpsdNoMore
02-22-2010, 6:30 PM
Since I'm moving to a city where I can't rent any pistols to try before I buy them I decided to go to the Iron Sights range in Oceanside to try some out. I've rented handguns there before and have had nothing but positive things to say about them.

I've been leaning towards getting a revolver, so I rented the Ruger SP100 in .357 mag with a 4" barrel and decided to try the Ruger Super Redhawk in .44 mag with the 7.5" barrel. I also rented a Springfield operator.

As far as shooting handguns, I used to have a P99 in .40 S&W and I've shot a snub nose 357 mag, Ruger single six, Ruger Mk.2 and a Kimber pro carry 2(?). I don't have a lot of experience shooting handguns, but I've shot enough to get a decent grip and can easily get shots within a body size target at 15 yards all day. This day I was shooting at 7 - 10 yards.

After shooting the .45, .38, .357 mag and then .44 mag I noticed that the groups with the .44 magnum were all noticeably tighter than with the other calibers. With the first cylinder of the .44 mag I noticed that the trigger seemed to be a little more consistent and it surprised me when it "broke" and fired the shot.

Could the tighter groups be attributed to a better trigger pull or what else would it be? I feel more comfortable with the .357 recoil, but the .44 didn't seem as bad as I thought it would be.

EDIT: I suppose the extra barrel length could help with the sights.

CSACANNONEER
02-22-2010, 7:25 PM
Extra barrel length is not as important as the longer site radius that the longer barrel allows. Also, it might even have something to do with the ammo. Who knows????

Shiloh13
02-22-2010, 7:32 PM
Could also have to do with the weight of the larger caliber guns. More weight can translate into a steadier shot.

23 Blast
02-22-2010, 7:34 PM
I think that most shooters will tell you that a clean-breaking, crisp trigger is one of the most important elements of accurate shooting, for both pists and rifles. My Colt XSE in .45 has probably the best trigger of all my pistols, and thus I shoot best with it except for my revolvers.

bear
02-23-2010, 8:01 AM
One thing's for sure, 7 to 10 yards is no test of 'accuracy'. Unless you're using a 2" barrel 'snubbie', I'd suggest a minimum distance of 25 yards before you can start to tell.

CSACANNONEER
02-23-2010, 8:17 AM
One thing's for sure, 7 to 10 yards is no test of 'accuracy'. Unless you're using a 2" barrel 'snubbie', I'd suggest a minimum distance of 25 yards before you can start to tell.

2" barrels are not really designed for shooting 75 feet. Sure, some people can shoot them very well at that distance and beyond but, they are more for shorter distances. Also, I know a top shooter (he and his wife hold/have held numerous BR world records) and custom rifle builder who did a little experiment once. He, along with Skip Talbot and others, set a string of targets up in line, at different distances. They found that the group size was dirrectly proportional to the distance. This means that, as long as you can acurrately and precisely measure your group sizes and distance from the target, you can compare groups sizes shot at any distance against those shot at another distance. As long as this is true, there is no minimum distance before you can start to tell. THe maximum distance would obviously depend on the capabilities of the exact load through that exact barrel though.

7x57
02-23-2010, 8:30 AM
With the first cylinder of the .44 mag I noticed that the trigger seemed to be a little more consistent and it surprised me when it "broke" and fired the shot.


This is the answer to your question. Recoil only affects accuracy if it induces a reaction in you. So if you are not flinching, then the better trigger is probably what matters.

I shoot much better with a 1911 in .45 than with a Glock in 9mm for similar reasons.

7x57

jonesjustin
02-23-2010, 8:47 AM
I have expirenced this with my 357 with 3.5 inc barrel and my dads .500 with 6 or 7 in barrel (the long one). I am much better with the 500 I think the longer sights with the crisp trigger break and weight of the 500 all contribute to my better shooting.

SCMA-1
02-23-2010, 9:17 AM
Clean, crisp and predictable trigger, longer sight radius, greater weight......these are all things that contribute to better shooting.

CornFedWB
02-23-2010, 9:26 AM
Clean, crisp and predictable trigger, longer sight radius, greater weight......these are all things that contribute to better shooting.

+1, my dad has the Ruger super redhawk 44 mag. That thing is a beauty, ammo is not cheap though.

cwiz
02-23-2010, 10:06 AM
Clean, crisp and predictable trigger, longer sight radius, greater weight......these are all things that contribute to better shooting.

+2 :)

I always thought i shot revolvers better than pistols but i'm pretty sure most of it had to do with the fact that most revolvers i shot were 4-6" long and the pistols were all 4" or less. Now i'm into 1911's with the 5" barrel and i am shooting better than i thought i ever would with a pistol, plus i think i'm just getting better at shooting pistols in general. keep practicing. I have found it is usually the indian and not the arrow that is the source of error. :D

CmpsdNoMore
02-23-2010, 10:34 AM
One thing's for sure, 7 to 10 yards is no test of 'accuracy'. Unless you're using a 2" barrel 'snubbie', I'd suggest a minimum distance of 25 yards before you can start to tell.

I'm no target shooter, by far. I generally shoot with the max distances of inside my apartment, since that's primarily where I need to be the best trained. However, even at such short ranges I noticed a difference in my groups between handguns and calibers.

Katana
02-23-2010, 12:20 PM
I'm more accurate with a larger caliber because a bigger bullet is more likely to wing the 10 ring. :D