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View Full Version : S&W Night Guard ~ Thought/Experience?


insin
02-22-2010, 3:56 AM
Night guard 327 or Nghtguard 386 in .357 mag
Hello all,
I have asked this question sometime ago, and hopefully a few more can chime on the matter I was looking to get the (7 or 8 round cylinder). It's light weight and has the potential to be a home defense weapon or even for use when a buddy an I hike 5+ miles in back lands to our favorite fishing hole. That being said we are always on constant look/scared out of black bears, wild dog, or even mountain lion. I believe that I may make a good camp defense weapon. in comparison I have handled a S&W 686. I am leaning toward a short/snub 2.5. I have no desire for a longer barrel due to my potential uses, and heh, its black which I have an affinity for. Not to mention .38 round could be used to my wife/I to practical.

Here is break down of weight:
Model 327 Night Guard - 7 shot .357MAG = 27.6 ounces
Model 386 Night Guard - .8 shot 357MAG = 28. 3 ounces
Model 329 Night Guard - 4 shot .44MAG = 2.3 ounce

Compared to the S&W 686 -model 686 Revolver = 35ounces



I know the legalities of carrying concealed so please do make this thread a " blah, blah, blah, you better have CCW! Or please don't make he argument my wrist would huft like heck when practicing l

That is not my primary question. Do you like your .357 Night guard? I have handed one at my local gun shop in a differed caliber and it fit my hand perfectly fine. Firing on regular bases could be taxing on the wrist I understand that, I have heard that argument to that effect every time the lightweight snubbies threads pop up. I fully expect and use of this weapon a home involve 2-3 shots basically would make the threat no longer interests me harassing me' ( I am stil talking wild animals here, I would hate to have to use weapon to protect my family, but if things came to that, then someone breaking into my house is going to join the "horizontal" club, followed with the permanent nap club).
SO PLEASE...comments on actual use of he firearm is here I'm inquiring about. Please don't reply if you only source on information on the internet, especially someone trying to "educate" me on something you have never even seen before or shot yourself

What are you're thoughts/experience with having such a weapon? I would even consider the same style (NG) in 44mag, however I'm kick on that would more then enough not to want to make that second shot. ( im sure what you mean ). Plus I an not living in Alaska. The biggest threat to me here at home would home defence or to diswade a mountain lion to threaten our fishing trips

Thanks alot

Miltiades
02-22-2010, 4:40 AM
I like S&W 2.5 inch revolvers and have several of them in K and L frame .357 magnum. I have seen a Night Guard revolver but have not fired one.

In your situation I would probably buy an older S&W 686 revolver in 4 inch length rather than a Night Guard because:

1. The weight of the all steel 686 is about 8 ounces more than the aluminum frame Night Guard, but I think that is an advantage in firing the gun rapidly at some animal advancing on you. Weight will steady the gun and help absorb recoil.

2. The 4 inch barrel is easier to shoot accurately than a 2.5 inch barrel, and gives you extra velocity with a given type of ammo. Concealment is not an issue in your case so the short barrel buys you nothing.

3. The Night Guard will cost about $300 more than a good used 686.

4. The one or two extra rounds in the Night Guard may not matter in an animal attack. Animals move fast, and if you haven't stopped or deterred the animal with 6 rounds, it is probably already on top of you and you won't get to fire the extra round or two.

5. The Night Guard has the internal lock and the older revolver does not.

nn3453
02-22-2010, 7:41 AM
I like S&W 2.5 inch revolvers and have several of them in K and L frame .357 magnum. I have seen a Night Guard revolver but have not fired one.

In your situation I would probably buy an older S&W 686 revolver in 4 inch length rather than a Night Guard because:

1. The weight of the all steel 686 is about 8 ounces more than the aluminum frame Night Guard, but I think that is an advantage in firing the gun rapidly at some animal advancing on you. Weight will steady the gun and help absorb recoil.

2. The 4 inch barrel is easier to shoot accurately than a 2.5 inch barrel, and gives you extra velocity with a given type of ammo. Concealment is not an issue in your case so the short barrel buys you nothing.

3. The Night Guard will cost about $300 more than a good used 686.

4. The one or two extra rounds in the Night Guard may not matter in an animal attack. Animals move fast, and if you haven't stopped or deterred the animal with 6 rounds, it is probably already on top of you and you won't get to fire the extra round or two.

5. The Night Guard has the internal lock and the older revolver does not.

All excellent points, except,

4. You can find a newer 686 in 8 shot capacity.

5. The lock FUD again. A pre-lock is more collectible and will cost more. The post lock is supposed to be "oh it has the Clinton lock that will make it fail if you even look at it funny." Not a concern in practice.

littlejake
02-22-2010, 8:10 AM
Does anyone know if the Night Guard series can fire lead ammo? Some S&W alloy revolvers must use jacketed ammo to prevent shooting the barrel sleeve out of the gun.

Mr. Beretta
02-22-2010, 9:04 AM
I like S&W 2.5 inch revolvers and have several of them in K and L frame .357 magnum. I have seen a Night Guard revolver but have not fired one.

In your situation I would probably buy an older S&W 686 revolver in 4 inch length rather than a Night Guard because:

1. The weight of the all steel 686 is about 8 ounces more than the aluminum frame Night Guard, but I think that is an advantage in firing the gun rapidly at some animal advancing on you. Weight will steady the gun and help absorb recoil.

2. The 4 inch barrel is easier to shoot accurately than a 2.5 inch barrel, and gives you extra velocity with a given type of ammo. Concealment is not an issue in your case so the short barrel buys you nothing.

3. The Night Guard will cost about $300 more than a good used 686.

4. The one or two extra rounds in the Night Guard may not matter in an animal attack. Animals move fast, and if you haven't stopped or deterred the animal with 6 rounds, it is probably already on top of you and you won't get to fire the extra round or two.

5. The Night Guard has the internal lock and the older revolver does not.


Couldn't agree more!

P.S. Carry the heavier 158 gr. mag rds. . Leave those 110gr. & 125gr. rds. at home.

insin
02-22-2010, 12:31 PM
So then the fact that the 686 has added wight for subsequent shots gives it advantage in that are? I am not really concerned with added cost of the Night Guard series, and I am shying away from a 4 inch barrel, however they are not completely ruled out. I am still looking primarily for a 2.5-3 inch barrel though. I just have an affinity for them. I have plenty of other target/longer barreled weapons.

Great replies, any other thoughts
Thanks

M47_Dragon
02-22-2010, 2:32 PM
I have handed one at my local gun shop in a differed caliber and it fit my hand perfectly fine.

Not sure which caliber you handled, but I am sure you aware the NG series come in K, L and N frames depending on caliber/cylinder capacity. Just a reminder to "feel out" the exact model you want before you buy.


I have been intrigued by the NG series since they've come out. I like the idea of one in .45 or the newer 10mm/.40 NG 310, but unfortunately, those only hold six rounds.

Miltiades
02-22-2010, 4:44 PM
I am still looking primarily for a 2.5-3 inch barrel though. I just have an affinity for them.

I can appreciate that, as I also have an affinity for them. In the S&W line the 3 inchers are fairly scarce compared to the 2.5 inch guns. You can probably find a 2.5 inch 686 like the one below for $600 if you shop around. It is a heavy gun but has a great trigger feel and will handle the heaviest .357 loads.

http://i116.photobucket.com/albums/o25/pogo2/SW686-23.jpg

insin
02-23-2010, 8:50 PM
I can appreciate that, as I also have an affinity for them. In the S&W line the 3 inchers are fairly scarce compared to the 2.5 inch guns. You can probably find a 2.5 inch 686 like the one below for $600 if you shop around. It is a heavy gun but has a great trigger feel and will handle the heaviest .357 loads.

That's a pretty sweet 686, and I have admit that opting for otherwise may (down the road) lead to regret.

There have still been no replies from owners of Night Guards. What should I make of this? I realize that the 686 is pretty much the bread and butter of a weapon in this class, but someone must have a night guard out there.

supermario
02-23-2010, 9:13 PM
I do not own one, but i have held one and I think they look and feel great and perfect for what you want it for. Its lightweight, 7 or 8 rounds, nice looking, feels really comfortable in my small hand and most important, its a Smith & Wesson:D If you have the $, buy it, if you dont like it, you can sell it on here for just about what you paid. I really want one but cant afford it yet. I was thinking of buying one when i get my firearms permit. I like how light it is, i dont care if it has snap to it. I know opinion are great to hear, but every person is different. To some, the only good gun is a $2k 1911 and to others a $300 sigma is perfect. To each his own and if you are asking for advice on this and appear to be wanting to hear good things about the Nightguard, just get it. You wont regret a Smith&Wesson revolver ever. They are the best out there! Thats my opinion. If i happen to get one before you did, i will let you know, so you can shoot it:D

supermario
02-23-2010, 9:15 PM
By the way, Martin B Retting has some. Thats where i held one.

QuarterBoreGunner
02-23-2010, 9:45 PM
Well, I have the 386 Sc/S which is essentially the same thing as the 386 NG; same as the 327 except on the 7 shot L-frame, not the 8 shot N-frame.

That being said, it carries very well, is a pleasure to shoot with .38s and can be a handfull with full house .357 Mags... no problems with the piece at all; I love mine.

I actually changed out the rear sight to the Cylinder & Slide Extreme Duty rear the same as the NightGuard, likewise the front to an XS Big Dot and added Pachmayer grips, so it's a home brew 386 Nightguard.

Of course I did all this *before* Smith & Wesson came out with the Nightguard series... razza frazza.

willbuyone
02-24-2010, 8:20 AM
I have the 386 NG 7 shot L frame. This is my fav handgun.
It is loads of fun to shoot! I like the all black look. It has a
very high cool factor. I put Crimson Trace Laser grips on mine
they are a perfect fit for this piece!

I also have S&W 327 PD this is an 8 shot N frame with 4"
barrel and full size Houge grips. It is 24.3 oz and I think it
would make a great trail gun. It shoots full house 357 mags
with ease.

insin
02-24-2010, 9:18 PM
I have the 386 NG 7 shot L frame. This is my fav handgun.
It is loads of fun to shoot! I like the all black look. It has a
very high cool factor. I put Crimson Trace Laser grips on mine
they are a perfect fit for this piece!

Thanks for the reply with some first hand experience with this handgun. Blackness definitely does it for me, BUT sometimes that chrome model 686 calls out to me.

I'm still leaning toward to Night Guard series.

Miltiades
02-25-2010, 4:29 AM
Blackness definitely does it for me, BUT sometimes that chrome model 686 calls out to me.

The model 686 is stainless steel, and not chrome plated.

insin
02-25-2010, 8:43 AM
The model 686 is stainless steel, and not chrome plated.

You are correct. That was a mis-wording on my part.

insin
03-01-2010, 11:35 PM
Any others prefer the black light weight (airlite/nightguard series) vs 686 in Stainless?

I think the lightness of the NightGuard series weapons would be lite in weight especially when using full .357 loads. Followup shots I figure would be slightly hampered due to the slight difference in gun weight to the S/S of a 686?