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S.F. 1357
01-17-2006, 3:39 PM
I was told that burning a small candle inside your safe is a good rust preventative. Theoretically, the candle uses up all the oxygen if your safe is airtight leaving little to be turned into rust.

Does anyone have any experience doing this because I'm tempted to try it.

grammaton76
01-17-2006, 3:49 PM
I was told that burning a small candle inside your safe is a good rust preventative. Theoretically, the candle uses up all the oxygen if your safe is airtight leaving little to be turned into rust.

Does anyone have any experience doing this because I'm tempted to try it.

Probably good if you have an airtight safe. However, I'm pretty sure that most safes are NOT airtight. My Sentry gun safe certainly isn't, unless perhaps I weather-sealed it aggressively.

xsquid
01-17-2006, 3:50 PM
Doubt if your safe is 100% airtight. Just get a goldenrod http://www.agenglish.com/Accessories.html MUCH safer than having an open flame in your safe.

delloro
01-17-2006, 3:59 PM
a byproduct of candle burning is water vapor.

bwiese
01-17-2006, 4:15 PM
Yep, candle is bad idea. It makes things _worse_.

Aside from any safety issues, burning typical hydrocarbons (parrafin, etc.) and assuming complete combustion (which ain't!) results in this...

One typical reaction - various other carbon counts occur too...

C20H44 + 31 O2 => 20 C02 + 22 H20

So we have some CO2 and moisture produced from burning.

Plus - CO2 dissolved in water results in some H2CO3, carbonic acid, being produced in solution in water vapor. That's a tad corrosive.

Get a GoldenRod and/or the silica gel moisture absorber...

anotherted
01-17-2006, 5:41 PM
works for mosquitoes in my tent however.

S.F. 1357
01-17-2006, 6:16 PM
Thanks guys. Glad I asked first. I already have the silica packs inside my safe. I just thought the candle might be worthwhile alternative.

Gnote
01-17-2006, 6:49 PM
works for mosquitoes in my tent however.

That's too funny!

Bobshouse
01-18-2006, 7:43 AM
I was told that burning a small candle inside your safe is a good rust preventative. Theoretically, the candle uses up all the oxygen if your safe is airtight leaving little to be turned into rust.

Does anyone have any experience doing this because I'm tempted to try it.

LOL...I can see it now, you go to open your safe the next day and everything in it is burnt to a crisp. Least it contained the fire!

Do us a favor and just stick a picture of a burning candle in your safe, it will do the same thing, only much safer.

Bob

Ubergeek
01-18-2006, 5:23 PM
Thanks guys. Glad I asked first. I already have the silica packs inside my safe. I just thought the candle might be worthwhile alternative.

Just FYI, silica gel can become saturated, but is 'rechargeable':

http://waltonfeed.com/grain/faqs/ivd2.html

M.

Fatcat
01-28-2006, 7:35 PM
There's are these "de-humidifier" heaters called "Gold-rods" that are a low-wattage heater housed withing a metal tube w/hardware. You have to run an electrical cord to the inside area of the safe. The idea is the heating element gives off warm heat that will help in reducing any residual humidity within the safe that could promote rust on firearms. It is not a "cure-all" that precludes regulary cleaning & oiling of your guns. That should be done on a regular basis even though you have not shot them. This as can be as simple a regular wipe down and punching the bore 2 or 3 times.

losangeles
01-29-2006, 9:45 AM
Here's something you can buy from Midway USA. There are many other good alternative products that'll help here:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=850609

saki302
02-04-2006, 3:19 AM
If you wanted to go nuts, drill a hole in the top of the safe, and flush it with nitrogen. Shut the (near airtight) door, and keep a trickle of n2 flowing to overpressure it, and keep air from creeping in. No rust for 100 years or until your N2 runs out :D

-Dave

kosmo
02-14-2006, 2:39 PM
If you wanted to go nuts, drill a hole in the top of the safe, and flush it with nitrogen. Shut the (near airtight) door, and keep a trickle of n2 flowing to overpressure it, and keep air from creeping in. No rust for 100 years or until your N2 runs out :D
-DaveAnother way is to vacuumize the safe. No air in it - no rust. It is much more complicated that filling with nitrogen, though.

Renron
03-03-2006, 6:34 AM
Without going in for some High dollar techniques you could put 1/2 cup of uncooked white rice in a paper bag or the wifes old nylon panty hose (not while she is wearing them thou). Rice draws moisture from the air, is cheap and easy to come by. Replace after about 2 months.
Renron

socalguns
03-03-2006, 11:36 AM
I think that would be as effective as putting crackers, chips, or even toast in there..
Sure it will draw some moisture, but not fast enough.

socal57chevy
03-24-2006, 5:46 PM
Just FYI, silica gel can become saturated, but is 'rechargeable':

http://waltonfeed.com/grain/faqs/ivd2.html

M.
I heard that "drying" them out in your oven can lead to traces of silica being transferred to the oven surfaces. I don't think I'd put them in the oven that bakes my pizza, but I'm no scientist.

CALI-gula
03-25-2006, 4:14 AM
I have used many bags of dessicant around the safe. I have also used a product called "Dri-Z-Air" and its companion screened holding tray, available from places like OSH and Home Depot. Boat suppliers sell it too. It is very inexpensive for how it performs. I have used similar calcium chloride contianers when storing some of my classic cars for long periods at a time, in the interiors, especially when I lived in "snow" states. Check out the link below. It costs much less at OSH or Home Depot than the website link notes:

http://www.drytheair.com/xcart/store/catalog/category_249_DriZAir_Products_page_1.html

It is comprised of calcium chloride crystals that you put in the special screened holder that company also sells. You can't use the stuff by itself - you need the container. I put one in each safe and after a few weeks, the container is holding a good amount of water, usually about a 5 full ounces (unbelievable but true). The crystals suck the water out of the air, bond to the water in a way that it does not let water continue to evaporate back into the atmosphere, then deposits the water into a catch can below the screened "holder" of the crystals.

The holder is sturdy and not apt to fall over, unless there was a severe earthquake or you really nail it hard accidentally. In any case, you need to be careful as calcium chloride is corrosive on direct contact (but not immediate) but you should immediately wipe it off and clean the area if it gets on metal (it is not corrosive to guns when introduced into the atmosphere of the safe as described above).

I recommend using it ESPECIALLY in the first few weeks of getting a new safe, as the fireproof liners and inner "soft" materials tend to hold moisture from sitting in the warehouses or on shipping docks before you buy it and bring it home.


.

maxicon
03-25-2006, 9:41 AM
I know these are jokes, but here's why you don't want to flush with N2 or store under vacuum:

- N2 is an asphyxiant (displaces oxygen), and going into a large container that has been filled with N2 is a very bad idea. This is the kind of thing regulated by OSHA, with interlocks and oxygen monitors and such.

- Vacuum will cause the more volatile components of the oils and greases to evaporate, depositing everywhere else in the safe, turning the oil and grease gummy, destroying their effectiveness and making a mess. Also, it will dry out wood stocks, causing them to crack and get brittle. Soft plastics will also lose their volatile plasticizers, and will get hard, discolored, and brittle.

Sorry if this is excessively geeky, but that's a specialty of mine. I work with vacuum systems and N2 vented systems, and believe me, these are not ideas you want to explore.

Really, there's just no substitute for a goldenrod. Plug it in and forget about it - no recharging, no corrosive chemical spills, no replacements, no worries. I touch mine now and again to make sure it's warm.

A $50 gizmo for insurance against rust in your expensive safe filled with all your favorite guns is a no-brainer. If you use a chemical or food based dessicator, forget about checking it a little too long, and get rust on your guns, you'll be sorry you didn't get the goldenrod.

max