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mistaboards
01-15-2006, 3:46 PM
Hi, I am considering buying the Mossberg 500 shotgun combo that comes with an 18.5" and a 28" barrel from Big 5. I noticed that the 28" barrel does not have threads for choke tubes. I was wondering how much you guys change your chokes? I am probably going to shoot targets and clays with the 28", do I need a choke compatible barrel?

Also, on another note, what is the difference between 9, 8, and 7.5 shot? What do the numbers represent and which one is bigger? Thanks

triaged
01-15-2006, 4:50 PM
They are fixed at Modified choke on the long barrel and Improved Cylinder (IC) on the short one.

Modified is a fairly standard choke and many people would go their whole life without changing it.

I however use an IC in my ancient 870 wingmaster. When I got it there was a 30" fixed full choke on it. I couldn't hit anything. I spent almost as much on a new barrel and choke tubes as that entire Moss Combo costs...:eek: It works good for the up close clays that I shoot out in the desert with buddies. Shooting on a real courses at a range I would most likely use a Mod.


If that is all you have money for it is a good gun to get...but there are a few down sides:

1) you can't put a mag extension on Mossbergs like you can on a "Remchester"
2) you are stuck with a Mod. choke. (if you have one choke to be stuck with this is the one).

Something that can go either way is the aluminum receiver. It most likely won't last as long as steel...but it is lighter and won't rust.


My (biased) suggestion would be to pick up a used Rem 870 express (they just get better with age) and look on ebay for a cheap short barrel for home defense if you plan on using the gun a lot. If it will spend most of it's life in the safe go for the Mossberg.

triaged
01-15-2006, 4:53 PM
Also, on another note, what is the difference between 9, 8, and 7.5 shot? What do the numbers represent and which one is bigger? Thanks
The larger the number the smaller the shot. For clays I normally use the cheapist made in USA game load in #8 shot. There isn't however much of a difference between the 3. See the below image:

http://www.shotgunworld.com/shot_sizes.jpg

Gnote
01-15-2006, 4:54 PM
It seems like there are different chokes for different types of clays. I'm currently doing trap right now and the consensus is that I use Improved Modified. A couple of times, folks at the range would ask what choke I had and when I said I.M. they would be like WHAT???? because they thought I was shooting skeet. For skeet, the cylinder seems like a good choke.

As far as the numbers are concerned, the smaller the number the larger the bb size and the less bbs you get in the same oz. 9s are good if you are shooting targets that are close but I would use 7.5s or 8 if you are doing trap. Bigger/heavier BBs are good because they will travel further.

Shotgun is so cool because you are shooting at a moving target.

Gnote
01-15-2006, 4:56 PM
You should check out http://shotgunworld.com/ for more info. Also do not be afraid to ask folks at the range. I've noticed that they are normally friendly and helpful.

mistaboards
01-15-2006, 6:00 PM
Thanks for all the info. You guys are great.

Gnote
01-15-2006, 9:11 PM
I see those go on sale at big 5 every so often so if your heart is set on it, you may want to wait. I know, waiting is a hard thing to do.

vega
01-15-2006, 10:43 PM
I noticed that the 28" barrel does not have threads for choke tubes. I was wondering how much you guys change your chokes? I am probably going to shoot targets and clays with the 28", do I need a choke compatible barrel?

Could it be that the choke is already screwed in the barrel that's why you did not see the threads? Check the box it if comes with choke wrench. I bought 20g and it does have choke screwed in it.

vega

triaged
01-15-2006, 11:08 PM
Could it be that the choke is already screwed in the barrel that's why you did not see the threads? Check the box it if comes with choke wrench. I bought 20g and it does have choke screwed in it.

vegaNo, it has a fixed choke. Big5 (and I'm sure other major retailers) have the special "combo" packages that come with a 28 & 18" fixed choke barrles. They used to go on sale every other week for $199.

They are good guns at a very good price...they just lack removeable chokes.

New barrels go for about $125 new at www.midway.com if you want to make it adjustable choke...but at $325 it isn't a good deal any more. I payed $80 for my 870 so spending $150 on a new barrel wasn't such a bad deal and I am going to cut down the 30" fixed choke barrel to 18" to make my own "combo" gun:cool:

Justang
01-24-2006, 12:08 AM
My (biased) suggestion would be to pick up a used Rem 870 express (they just get better with age) and look on ebay for a cheap short barrel for home defense if you plan on using the gun a lot. If it will spend most of it's life in the safe go for the Mossberg.

Remember that's a biased suggestion. I'd put my Mossy up against any 870. ;) but that's my biased opinion. :p

461
01-24-2006, 8:35 AM
I bought a Mossberg 500 youth in 20ga. for my kids to shoot and it's probably had over a thousand rounds through it and never had a problem. I think it's a quality firearm and would have no problem buying another one for myself but I've already got a Winchester that's older than I am.

The kids gun came with interchangeable chokes, but the modified has been in it since day one and I'd have to dig deep to find the other two.

sargenv
01-24-2006, 12:43 PM
I have one. I think I paid $100 for that gun used with both barrels. The model I have has the max 5 rounds plus 1 (6 max without a plug). It's a beater shotgun, and you get what you pay for. I hardly use it anymore but it worked for all the years I did use it. It's easy to take apart for cleaning and it just works. It's not the most elegant way to shoot, but I've shot a number of 25 straights with it at skeet and if you buy the lighter loaded shells, almost anyone can shoot it without too many issues. It does get annoying with the heavier payload shells and you really don't want to shoot slugs out of it unless you like being beaten up.

Odd that the longer barrel does not come with a screw in choke option, mine did. I've had mine since oh about 1987.

Vince

CowtownBallin
01-30-2006, 9:17 PM
I work at Big 5 here in Davis, CA, and I recently picked up the Mossberg 500 Security model (only one barrel, as opposed to the two-barrel combo). I took it out to the range this weekend, shooting some 7.5/8 shot game/target rounds and some slugs, and I must say, I really liked the thing. I wasn't too fond of the trigger, but they're all pretty much like that. I think it was definitely $260 (with dros + tax) well spent. As soon as I'm done setting up my ARs and my motorcycle, it's going to get an AR-type stock and a heat shield with ghost-ring sights :D

crs1
01-31-2006, 8:38 AM
I have both a Mossberg500 and a Rem 870, and I think each one has their own strengths. Both good...no, GREAT guys for the money. My 870 was the first gun I ever bought, I will never sell it. It is a paragon of reliability. The Mossberg is lighter, and though I haven't used it as much, the US Military seems to be okay with the aluminum receiver. The lighter weight of the Mossy is more suitable for tactical situations, I would think...I am taking a tactical shotgun class in two weeks, 500 rounds of slugs, buckshot, etc, and using the Mossy, so we'll see.

As far as chokes go, you need to experiment first and see what works for you. Just because the guy on the Clays course next to you is using modified, doesn't mean you should. There are many other factors...Those being barrel length, manufacturer (the apertures for the different choke sizes aren't universal), ammo type (wad size, powder, shot size). What comes with that Mossberg is a good general setup to get you started. Once you figure out the game, you will have a tool box full of choke tubes you don't need anymore.