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Bugei
02-11-2010, 7:24 AM
What I'd really like to shoot at Appleseed is an AR. It's name-listed on Roberti-Roos (Olympic) and I keep it out-of-state for that reason. It's in its original configuration with flash suppressor, telescoping stock, pistol grip, etc.

Would it be legal -- or otherwise inadvisable -- to
1) go to where I have it
2) remove the bolt and mag
3) insert the .22 conversion kit
4) leave the .223 mag and bolt out of state
5) bring the rifle home
6) shoot with it at a public shooting range?

I searched the FAQs but couldn't find any match to the word "conversion" or "22", which seemed odd.

Second page of the flowchart lists the Olympic in Appendix B, but would that apply to a rimfire rifle conversion?

Even if legal, would it invite the kind of legal hassle that could ruin an otherwise-splendid day of shooting?

Adehtla
02-11-2010, 7:35 AM
It's a named firearm so you're pretty much hosed, IIRC.

Lone_Gunman
02-11-2010, 7:36 AM
It is my understanding that if it is listed by name it does not matter if you do a caliber conversion. It is an assault weapon no matter what.

Lone_Gunman
02-11-2010, 7:38 AM
Go through the interactive flow chart. It's linked at the top of the page.

Bugei
02-11-2010, 7:43 AM
Go through the interactive flow chart. It's linked at the top of the page.

Yup, that did it. It shows as illegal. Thanks, all.
Ah, well. I'll pick another rifle for Appleseed.

Oh, and thanks for the fast turnaround, too. 19 minutes from question to definitive answer! Gotta love CG; knowledgeable people are always around.

CHS
02-11-2010, 8:14 AM
Technically, with a .22 upper or conversion, the listed AW is actually legal in CA. The PC says "the following centerfire rifles" before listing the guns.

However, it's still listed my make and model, and while you have a court-defensible case, do you have the money and time for it?

unusedusername
02-11-2010, 12:49 PM
Its a lot cheaper just go pick up a non-listed lower and stick the upper from your Olympic arms on it.

Just leave the listed lower out of state.

Another plus is that if its only ever going to be used as a .22 rimfire then you can have a regular pistol grip and a detachable magazine on it. Just leave the .223 bolt at home when you take it out.

ke6guj
02-11-2010, 12:54 PM
Technically, with a .22 upper or conversion, the listed AW is actually legal in CA. The PC says "the following centerfire rifles" before listing the guns.

However, it's still listed my make and model, and while you have a court-defensible case, do you have the money and time for it?

Actually, the PC says semi-automatic, not centerfire.

12276. As used in this chapter, "assault weapon" shall mean the following designated semiautomatic firearms:
(a) All of the following specified rifles:

A semi-auto rimfire rifle that is listed IS considered an AW.

ke6guj
02-11-2010, 1:13 PM
What I'd really like to shoot at Appleseed is an AR. It's name-listed on Roberti-Roos (Olympic) and I keep it out-of-state for that reason. It's in its original configuration with flash suppressor, telescoping stock, pistol grip, etc.

Would it be legal -- or otherwise inadvisable -- to
1) go to where I have it
2) remove the bolt and mag
3) insert the .22 conversion kit
4) leave the .223 mag and bolt out of state
5) bring the rifle home
6) shoot with it at a public shooting range?as mentioned above, not legal if it is a listed make/model.

Second page of the flowchart lists the Olympic in Appendix B, but would that apply to a rimfire rifle conversion?

wht is the exact make/model of your Olympic?

If it isn't one of the following, it isn't listed
Olympic Arms AR-15
Olympic Arms Car-97
Olympic Arms PCR (all)

If it doesn't say AR15, Car-97, or PCR on it, it isn't listed and would be off-list. If not listed, it could be legally brought into CA in a CA-legal configuration, fixed-mag or featureless.

Bugei
02-12-2010, 12:18 PM
Technically, with a .22 upper or conversion, the listed AW is actually legal in CA. The PC says "the following centerfire rifles" before listing the guns.

However, it's still listed my make and model, and while you have a court-defensible case, do you have the money and time for it?

Nope. And even if I did, I have better uses for the dough.

Bugei
02-12-2010, 12:25 PM
as mentioned above, not legal if it is a listed make/model.



wht is the exact make/model of your Olympic?

If it isn't one of the following, it isn't listed


If it doesn't say AR15, Car-97, or PCR on it, it isn't listed and would be off-list. If not listed, it could be legally brought into CA in a CA-legal configuration, fixed-mag or featureless.


Heh. I keep a record of make and serial number, but not model....and it's kind of a long drive just to read the markings on the lower. And I'd hate to have to defend it in court, even legal. An officer could look at it, see "Olympic" and decide to let the judge decide.

Let it sit, slumbering and tucked up all cozy out of state until CGF gets the litigation straightened out. In the meantime, there are cheaper alternatives.

Besides, I get a little wood every so often when I reflect on how much some of our legislative class hate that I own one, even out of state.

bwiese
02-12-2010, 12:29 PM
Technically, with a .22 upper or conversion, the listed AW is actually legal in CA. The PC says "the following centerfire rifles" before listing the guns.


No, 12276PC Roberti-Roos says "Semiautomatic firearms" and lists "rifles", "pistols" and "shotguns". The RR list has a regulatory echo in 11 CCR 5495 so I need to check that too.

One could argue that a listed manually-cycled AR is not banned by this (which is really a separate concept from 'characteristic features' which are pistol grips, telestocks, etc.) One could also argue a non-shoulder-fired long gun was not banned by this either :) DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME, KIDDIES...

Nevertheless it's not worth the fight. Lowers are $125 or so, why drag around silly cop+DA bait with you?